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At Jfflarp's Mu&t 



©cta&tr, 1915 



Opening £umbtx 




Saint Mary's School Library 



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With this Opening [Number of the 20th Volume of the Muse 
is combined the Summer Number, including the account of the 1915 
Commencement and the Notes of the Summer. 

The next number of the Muse — The Autumn Number — may 
be expected October 30th. 



IDWARDS •■DOUGHTON PRINTING CO.. EALCISH. N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

OPENING NUMBER 

Vol. XX. October, 1915. No. 1 



God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



Alma Mater 



(Tune: "Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Or earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Seventy-third Opening 



On Thursday morning, September 16, with the Chapel Service 
at 9.00 o'clock, followed by Assembly in the School Room, the 
Seventy-third Session of St. Mary's was simply and auspiciously 
opened. 

The preparations for the Opening had been complete for some 
days and the preceding week had been busy with the preliminaries. 
Miss Thomas joined those who were already on the ground on the 
10th, the other teachers came in from their widely scattered sum- 
mer homes, and the girls were on hand promptly. A number of 
teachers were back for Sunday and by Monday night it seemed that 
School had actually started. 

The non-resident students registered Monday morning, and Tues- 
day the new girls had their clay, though there were enough of the 
Seniors back to aid the teachers in getting them properly introduced. 
Wednesday while the new girls were enjoying the "entrance test 
in English" the old girls were registering, and by Wednesday night 
all were practically ready for work. 

Bishop Cheshire, President of the Trustees of St. Mary's as 
well as Bishop of the Diocese, was with the Rector in the opening 
Chapel Service and welcomed the members of the School back in 
brief and well-chosen words. In the School Room the Rector spoke 
briefly and pointedly, and putting one point of his speech into 
immediate practice the regular School routine at once began. 

Already all feel at home and as if the routine had hardly been 
dropped. 

There is every prospect of a good session. The numbers are 
about the same as last year, with the probability of a considerable 
addition after the holidays. The new girls promise well and new 
and old girls vie with one another in enthusiastic interest and loyalty. 
If Commencement finds the promise of the Opening become a 
reality, the Session of 1915-16 will have been a season of much 
pleasure and profit to all who are to have a part in it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Rector's Opening Words 



(Spoken in the School Room on September 16th, in; opening the new 
session.) 

Young ladies, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you to St. 
Mary's School. As the Bishop told you in the Chapel it is very lone- 
some here in the summer time and we miss you all very much, and it 
is a very real and genuine pleasure to have you come back and be 
with you once more. I am especially glad to have the privilege of 
welcoming here the new girls. You have come wondering how you 
are going to get on, and I wish to say for your encouragement that 
we have looked you over and think that you are a particularly nice 
looking set of girls. I hope that each one of you will try to do her 
best to keep up the general average and to improve in such wise as 
to make a general average improvement for the whole body. 

We are beginning what is for most of us a new period of work. 
Some of us have been working all summer, but most of us have had 
considerable rest and begin again serious work. I think it would 
help you a little if I use an illustration which I have used before, 
and which is familiar to many of you. You know that when you 
have to go into very cold water, if you wade in slowly, it is one long 
drawn out agony from the tips of your toes to your neck. Whereas, 
if you will boldly plunge in all at once the deed is done and there is 
practically no discomfort. It is the same way with your work here. 
The way to begin is to begin. The work that some of you have done 
the last one or two days since you have arrived is merely preliminary. 
The School really began this morning with the Chapel Service which 
we have just had, and now we are preparing for the serious work of 
the year. Let each one of you determine to begin at once as strenu- 
ously as possible and not to postpone your best endeavors until a 
little later on. 

Whenever you find yourselves in a perfectly new environment in 
which there are a number of new rules and regulations, it may at 
first appal you. I want to ask you to look at this in the right way. 
It will be your experience as long as you live to find yourselves in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



new places where you have to act differently from the way in which 
you have acted before. A number of you may visit foreign countries, 
and you will all visit other States and other cities, hotels and 
homes. Wherever you find yourselves at any time you will always 
find that the new environment with its new and strange conditions 
makes necessary a certain line of conduct on your part. This will 
not involve learning a long list of rules and regulations, but simply 
a careful observance on your part, wherever you may be, of such 
obvious consideration for others as is necessary for their comfort 
and convenience, and this line of conduct will usually be suggested 
to your own minds by your own common sense and inborn courtesy. 

And so here please do not think that there are a number of rules 
and regulations that you have got to learn at the beginning, but just 
remember that wherever you find yourself in strange circumstances 
you must consider that you are one of a large number, and that the 
convenience and comfort of all demand that you should consider what 
is best for others. Your own courtesy would as a rule suggest what 
is necessary, and whenever you are uncertain it is always possible 
at the time to ask others what is customary. "When you are at Rome 
do as the Romans do," is a very useful rule to remember. In this mat- 
ter be careful to ask members of the Faculty or older students whose 
judgment you can trust, and then you will have no difficulty in 
going through the School in a way that will be satisfactory to every- 
body else, and will in the end bring pleasure to yourself. I ask you 
then to begin at once to use your most strenuous endeavors to accom- 
plish the best that is in you, and to take as the one great rule of life 
here consideration for others, which is the foundation of Christian 
charity and of true breeding. And I ask you to begin your co- 
operation right now by helping us in every way to get the work 
started at once. There are very many of you, and in order to avoid 
confusion each one must try to do exactly as she is asked, and listen 
carefully to get clearly in her mind the requests that are made, and 
then try to carry out these requests in a way that will be considerate 
of others and enable us all to start off with comfort to everybody. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Resident Student List, September, 1915 



Albertson, Bertha Sears (N. C.) 
Allen Virginia Caroline (N. C.) 
Anderson, Lucile (N. C.) 
Arbogast, Katherine Hutton (N. C.) 
Arbogast, Louise Hart (N. C.) 
Askew, Elspeth Gold (N. C.) 
Bacon, Sarah Shellman (Ga.) 
Badham, Emma Hudgins (N. C.) 
Barber, Elizabeth Worth (N. C.) 
Bartholomew, Ruby Lee (N. C.) 
Beatty, Laura L. (Md.) 
Bennett, Helen Electa (Pla.) 
Best, Margaret (N. C.) 
Blodgett, Edith Kinsley (R. I.) 
Bond, Carolista (Va.) 
Borden, Sarah Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Bourne, Katherine Wimberly (N. C.) 
Braxton, Sadie Charles (N. C.) 
Bray, Violet Marie (N. C.) 
Brigham, Helen (Ga.) 
Brinley, Anne Abeel (N. J.) 
Bryan, Julia (Tenn.) 
Budd, Annie Lester (Fla.) 
Burke, Cornelia Hine (La.) 
Cameron, Annie Sutton (N. C.) 
Carter, Margaret Robena (N. C.) 
Cheatham, Frances Horn (N. C.) 
Collins, Mildred (Md.) 
Converse, Annabelle (Ga.) 
Copeland, Hattie Woodard (N. C.) 
Copeland, Hattie Wooten (N. C.) 
Corbitt, Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Culver, Dorothy Todd (N. C.) 
Daniels, Nettie Carol (N. C.) 
Davis, Emilye (Md.) 
Denham, Flora Virginia (Ga.) 
DeLoatch, Jane Drake (Va.) 
DePass, Emma Marye (Fla.) 
Dixon, Roberta (N. C.) 
Dorsey, Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Dougherty, Muriel (U. S. A.) 
Drane, Katherine Parker (N. C.) 
Edwards, Ida Lee (Va.) 



Elliott, Katherine (N. C.) 
English, Mary (N. C.) 
Fairley, Jeanet (N. C.) 
Floyd, Mary Auning (S. C.) 
Foster, Georgia (Ga. ) 
Freeman, Anna Mae (N. C.) 
Frohne, Josephine Tanner (Minn.) 
Galbraith, Selena Emma (S. C.) 
Garriguez, Alice Louise (N. C.) 
Gebert, Ruth Ward (La.) 
Geitner, Frances Royer (N. C.) 
Gentry, Gladys Julia (Ga.) 
Gilmer, Catherine (N. C.) 
Gold, Margaret Howard (N. C.) 
Harding, Rena Brickell Hoyt (N. C.) 
Hillman, Frances Bennett (Tenn.) 
Hitchcock, Deborah Victoria (Pa.) 
Holmes, Caroline White (N. C. ) 
Holt, Dolores Stevens (N. C.) 
Holt, Mary deRosset (N. C.) 
Howard, Charlotte Morissey (N. C.) 
Hughes, Adeline Edmonds (N. C.) 
Hyatt, Charline Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Ivey, Annie (S. C.) 
Jenkins, Elmyra (N. C.) 
Jensen, Lucy Katherine (N. C.) 
Jerger, Mildred Barnwell (Ga.) 
Jones, Catherine (Ala.) 
Jones, Loula (Va.) 
Jones, Margaret (Ala.) 
Jones, Valette (N. C.) 
Jutkins, Velma Bertram (Col.) 
Kent, Constance Williams (Va.) 
Kincaid, Rosalyn May (N. C.) 
Kirtland, Mildred Elizabeth (Fla.) 
Knight, Emeliza Braswell (N. C.) 
Lamb, Susan Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Lassiter, Virginia Heath (Va.) 
Latham, Alive Colin (N. C.) 
Laughinghouse, Helen (N. C.) 
Lynah, Marion (S. C.) 
Mardre, Clara Urie (N. C.) 
Marston, Margaret Spencer (N. C.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Martin, Fannie Biggs (N. C.) 
Mason, Helen Carhart (N. C.) 
Merrimon, Gertrude Gloister (N. C.) 
Morgan, Henrietta Marshall (N. C.) 
Moye, Novella Higgs (N. C.) 
Mullins, Mary (S. C.) 
Myers, Josephine Macon (S. C.) 
McElhannon, Roberta (D. C.) 
McLaughlin, Martha Robbins (N. C.) 
McLaws, Lallie Hobby (Ga.) 
Norman, Jane H. (N. C.) 
Northrop, Sue Cary (N. C.) 
Paul, Clara Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Paul, Lola Almeta (N. C.) 
Peel, Eva Irene (N. C.) 
Pottle, Minerva Virginia (Ga.) 
Pratt, Agnes Theresa (N. C.) 
Pugh, Lois (Ga.) 
Ravenel, Estelle Strozier (Ga.) 
Rawlings, Sarah Little John (N. C.) 
Register, Jewell Little (Ga.) 
Relyea, Eleanor (D. C.) 
Robinson, Annie Huske (Ga.) 
Rose, Nellie Cooper (N. C.) 
Sears, Frances McKee (N. C.) 
Sinclair, Mattie Louise (N. C.) 
Smith, Jaque (N. C.) 
Snyder, Helen (N. Y.) 
Springs, Margaret Elizabeth (S. C.) 



Stallings, Fannie Marie (Va.) 
Stewart, Carobell Louise (Ga.) 
Stewart, Katherine (N. C.) 
Stockton, Minerva Nelson (Ky.) 
Sublett, Judith Eleanor (Va.) 
Sugg, Minnie Exum (N. C.) 
Swett, Ruth Davis (N. C.) 
Taylor, Allene Hargrove (N. C.) 
Thomas, Josephine Macon (N. C.) 
Thomas, Lila Pope (Ga.) 
Thorn, Rubie Logan (S. C.) 
Tillotson, Frances Marguerite (Minn.) 
Tredwell, May Baker (Va.) 
Waddell, Elizabeth (N. C.) 
Walker, Caroline Mary (S. C.) 
Waters, Frances Harriet (Conn.) 
Watt, Jacksonia (Ga.) 
Weakley, Helen (Md.) 
Wiley, Sarah Virginia (N. C.) 
Williams, Rita Gay (N. C.) 
Williams, Virginia (N. C.) 
Wilson, Josephine Saville (Va.) 
Wood, Sara Louise (N. C.) v 

Woolford, Nancy Polk (Va.) 
Wright, Helen Cherry (N. C.) 
Wright, Martha (N. C.) 
Yates, Ethel Caroline (S. C.) 
Yates, Eulalie Wilson (S. C.) 



Changes in the Faculty 



We are again fortunate in 1915-16 in that there are very few 
changes in either the teachers or officers. The few friends we lose 
we give up with much regret, and we extend a warm welcome to 
those who take their places. 

Miss Ricks resigned in June to spend this year in study. She 
planned at first to enter Columbia University but later decided to 
attend Peabody College, Knoxville, Tenn. Her place in charge of 
the Mathematics Department is taken by Miss Jewett M. Snook, of 
Bagdad, Kentucky. Miss Snook was graduated from the Science 
Hill Preparatory School at Shelbyville, Kentucky, in 1906, was 
then four years at Wellesley College, from which she received her 



The St. Maet's Muse. 



B. A. in 1910, and studied the past summer at Teachers' College, 
Columbia University. She has taught Mathematics at the Berwick 
School in Virginia, in the public schools at Bagdad, and last year 
at St. Mary's Seminary, St. Mary's City, Maryland. 

Miss Shattuck's. place as teacher of English is taken by Miss Janet 
Brownell Glen of Rye, New York. Miss Glen is no stranger to some 
of the older persons of St. Mary's, for she was a teacher here many 
years ago, and after a rich experience in study in this country and 
abroad, and as teacher in two well-known schools in the North, she 
returns again to her old school. Miss Glen studied at Lake Erie 
College, Painesville, Ohio, and at Cornell, and has been a summer 
student at the University of Chicago. In 1910 she studied in 
Elorence, Italy, and the following summers in Madrid, Spain. She 
taught at Oberlin College, then spent a number of years at St. 
Mary's, was at Bye Seminary from 1899 to 1908, and the Leete 
School, New York City from 1911 to 1914. 

Miss Shattuck is teaching this year at Miss Shipley's School, 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Miss Hart's place in charge of the Infirmary is taken by Mrs. 
Janet L. Bottum, late of Penland, N. C. Mrs. Bottum is also not 
a stranger to many St. Mary's people, and will seem even less of 
a stranger as she is the mother of Miss Frances and Miss Margaret 
Bottum. During the past two years she has been engaged in mission 
work at several points in the District of Asheville, and comes 
from that work to take up the duties at St. Mary's 

Miss Elise Stiles, who had expected to return to St. Mary's 
for her third year as assistant housekeeper, decided to go into training 
at St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, the Rector having released 
her from her engagement here, and her place is taken by Miss Edith 
Holmes of Asheville, who received her certificate in Domestic 
Science at the last commencement. 

Miss Margaret Bottum, of the class of '15, is added to the officers 
as an additional stenographer and will work chiefly with Mr. Cruik- 
shank. 

With the exception of these changes the Faculty and officers will 
be the same as in the session of 1914-15. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With) the Rector and H's Family in the Sumroer 



The week after the close of the session is always a busy one 
with the Rector for he is then engaged in the final plans for the 
St. Mary's Conference which is held at the School the first week 
in June. During the Conference this year he not only proved a very 
agreeable host but took an important part in the Conference itself 
both in general discussions and in a series of brief addresses which 
he gave each morning on the "Better Rendering of the Concerted 
Parts of the Church Services." Mr. Lay is not only deeply interested 
in most of the larger questions of the day, but takes a special interest 
in Social Service, and is the chairman of the North Carolina Dio- 
cesan Commission on Social Service. At the conclusion of the Con- 
ference itself the members generously attested their appreciation 
of his general interest and broad knowledge, and especially of his 
work in establishing the Conference, by a gift of the where-with-all to 
make some important additions to his library. 

On June 12th, Mr. Lay was summoned to Sewanee where at the 
Commencement the degree of Doctor of Civil Laws was conferred 
upon him, a high honor. The week of June 18th the annual Con- 
vention of the Diocese of Asheville met in Asheville and Dr. Lay 
spent several days there, being the guest of Col. and Mrs. Theodore 
Davidson. During his visit there he saw many St. Mary's girls and 
made a brief address to the Council. 

On June 21st he left for New York and a month in the North 
going by way of Norfolk and the Old Dominion Steamer. He spent 
a few days in New York making the final arrangements for teachers 
and then joined Mrs. Lay at St. Paul's School where they visited 
his brother, Mr. Beirne Lay, until July 19th. They then returned 
to New York and its neighborhood for brief visits to some of their 
friends, and got back to the School early in August. 

Mrs. Lay left soon after the Conference by boat from Norfolk 
for Boston accompanied by Ellen. They visited relatives in New 
Hampshire and Ellen remained there the rest of the summer. In the 
absence of her father and mother, Miss Elizabeth Lay was in charge 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



at the Rectory, while George Balch Lay was home most of the time. 
Nancy and Lucy enjoyed visits a good part of the summer, especially 
their exj3eriences with Miss Robins and her party of little St. 
Mary's girls at Miss Gwyn's Camp at Springdale, 1ST. C. 



With) tfye Teacbers 



Miss Thomas had expected to attend the Summer School at Teach- 
ers' College, as she has done for several years, but found that she 
could not get it in in addition to her trip to California, so she spent 
June and July with her relatives in Charleston, Florence and 
Columbia, S. C, and left on August 5th with her party of St. Mary's 
girls for the much envied trip to the Exposition. They were gone 
until August 31. After further visits to her relatives in South Caro- 
lina, she spent a few days with Lanie Hales in Wilson and got back to 
St. Mary's, September 12th. 

Miss Dowd returned from her season's study in New York the 
middle of June, full of enthusiasm over her ISTew York teacher, 
Edwin Farmer, and her experiences. She stayed in Raleigh a few 
days and spent the summer with friends at Flat Rock and Saluda, 
resuming her duties as head of the music department at the beginning 
of the session. 

Miss Clara Fenner in June and July visited her old friends 
Misses Pixley, Schutt and Shipp, all former teachers at St. Mary's, 
in Hendersonville, greatly enjoying her visit. During her absence 
Miss Lil Fenner was with Miss Gerber, and on Miss Clara's return 
Miss Lil left for a visit to Baltimore, and on July 30th with 
another sister sailed from New York for San Francisco by way of 
the Panama Canal. She had a glorious trip and got back to Raleigh 
early in September. 

Miss Katie went as usual to her sister, Mrs. Hawley, in Fayette- 
ville, and after a comfortable summer she is much encouraged by her 
improvement and hopes to be quite equal to her teaching. 

Miss Lee also spent the summer recuperating, and visited friends in 
Hendersonville and Asheville. This year she returns to St. Mary's 
as a resident teacher, having rented her home on Boylan Avenue. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mademoiselle Rudnicka spent a few days after school at St. 
Mary's and then went by sea to Boston en route to Dexter, Maine, 
where she spent the summer with friends. 

Miss Urqnhart was delayed in Raleigh for some days with her 
sprained ankle and visited friends here before going to Winston 
for a visit. From Winston she went to her home in Ashfield, Mass. 

Miss Davis had an engagement at the close of School to coach 
a play in Reidsville, where she formerly taught, but before the 
performance of the play she was called to her home in Elmira, ISTew 
York, by the serious illness of her mother. She had an appointment 
during this summer as Playground Supervisor in Elmira, a work 
that she much enjoys, and spent a few weeks in the latter part of 
August in Boston in further study with her teacher there. 

Mr. Stone after the Conference put in a few days work at the 
School and then took his newly graduated daughter for a long 
promised trip to Boston and Harvard. They went by sea and had a 
delightful visit full of unprecedented pleasures for Miss Florence, 
who however returned at once to Greensboro after her trip. On his 
return Mr. Stone was again at the School for some days and then 
traveled in the eastern part of the State in the interest of the 
School until the first of August. 

Mr. Owen gave a very successful recital at Oxford shortly after 
the close of School and then he and Mrs. Owen visited friends in 
Fayetteville for a week, but they spent most of their summer at 
their home in West Raleigh where Mr. Owen is doing some teaching. 

Miss Phillips visited in Winston before returning home, and 
Miss Abbott was delayed in Baltimore by a slight operation, but 
both were at home for most of the summer, 

Miss Seymour went at once to her home in Massachusetts, and 
Miss Barton, to her home at Weston, Mass. 

Miss Shields likewise enjoyed the summer at her home in Scot- 
land ISTeck, while Miss Shull after a visit to friends in Morganton 
was with friends at Manchester, N. C, for most of the summer, 
and Miss Metcalf spent the vacation at her home in Chicago. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



Miss Roberts represented the music faculty in summer study and 
was in New York for two months. 

Miss Robins spent June with her sister in Richmond and then 
joined her party of girls in Raleigh and escorted them to Miss 
Gwyn's Camp where she chaperoned them during July. 

Miss Sutton accompanied Miss Stiles to her home in Georgia 
the middle of June for her vacation and had a most delightful time 
getting back to the School about the first of July. 

Miss Frances and Miss Margaret Bottum helped with the office 
work during June and July, and spent the rest of the summer with 
their mother in the mountains. 

Mr. Cruikshank was on duty at the School during the summer 
except for a very pleasant ten days camping trip in Western Carolina 
which he took with Mr. Owen, Mr. Cullins and Mr. Fred Staudt in 
the Ford early in August. Mrs. Cruikshank had her sister, Miss 
Mary Pride Jones of New York, with her most of the summer, and 
her cousin Miss Alethea Collins, and Mr. Cruikshank's cousin, Miss 
Mary Cruikshank of Maryland, were also her guests. 



New Girl — (looking on the Bulletin Board where the Bible Classes were 
posted) — "Bible one and two? Why I think I'm far enough advanced for 
Bible two, don't you?" 

Dollar — "I'm more religious than you are. I have 'In God we trust' 
written on me." 

Penny — "I don't care. I bet I go to church oftener than you do." — Ex- 
change. 

"Geduldig" means "patient" but V. A. didn't know that. 

Mr. S. — Well, Miss A., what does it mean? I am "geduldig." 

V. A. (hesitatingly) — "Does it mean old?" 

S. M. — -"I've got an awful headache, I believe I'll go over to the confirmary. 

New Girl — -"Do you get your mail over there in Eagle Rock?" 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



THE 1915 COMMENCEMENT 



Dramatic Club Play 

The annual play by the Dramatic Club was given Saturday even- 
ing, May 22, before an audience so large that a number of persons 
could not find seats. 

Concerning the excellent performance the News and Observer 
wrote as follows : 

On Saturday evening the Dramatic Club at St. Mary's presented Shake- 
speare's delightful "Comedy of Errors." This play is rarely acted and 
presents in its loose plot a difficult medium for amateurs, but the young 
actors, under the able directorship of Miss Davis, who is instructor in 
expression, entered to the full into the spirit and fun of the play, and gave a 
performance that was not only deliciously amusing throughout, but thorough- 
ly finished and dramatically correct as well. Miss Elizabeth Carrison, a mem- 
ber of the graduating class was a charming Adriana, who thoroughly 
appreciated the humor and the flavor of the situation. The work of Miss 
Brinley and Miss Stigler, the pair of twins whose confused identities make 
the plot of the play, was very good indeed. Miss Carter as Dromio of 
Ephesus did splendid work also. Other parts that stood out particularly 
were those of Luciana, taken by Miss Adelyn Barbee, Pinch by Miss Lanie 
Hales, also a member of the graduating class, and Aegeon, Miss Josephine 
Wilson. 

Altogether the play was a most unusual performance and showed Miss 
Davis' fine training to the best advantage. 

The cast was as follows: 

Solinus, Duke of Ephesus Courtney Crowther 

Aegeon, a Merchant of Syracuse Josephine Wilson 

Antipholus of Ephesus: Antipholus of Syracuse — '(Twin Brothers and Sons 

to Aegeon and Aemilia) Adele Stigler; Anne Brinley 

Dromio of Ephesus: Dromio of Syracuse — (Twin Brothers and Attendants 

on the Two Antipholuses) Robena Carter; Wirt Jordan 

Angelo, a Goldsmith Matilda Hancock 

First Merchant, friend to Antipholus of Syracuse Lois Pugh 

Second Merchant, to whom Angelo is a debtor Eliza Davis 

Pinch, a schoolmaster Lanie Hales 

Aemilia, wife of Aegeon, an Abbess at Ephesus Ruby Bartholomew 

Adriana, wife to Antipholus of Ephesus Elizabeth Carrison 

Luciana, her sister Adelyn Barbee 

Officers Agnes Barton, Katherine Stewart 

Attendants Francis Geitner, Jacksonia Watt 

Scene: Ephesus. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



Bishop ^night's Address 

The baccalaureate sermon was delivered this year by the Rt. Rev. 
Albion W. Knight, D.D., Vice-Chancellor of the University of the 
South and former bishop of Cuba. 

The following is the account of the Bishop's address as it appeared 

in the News and Observer. 

"Mothers and fathers should not rush their children into adult life. This 
is a warning this generation needs." With these words Bishop Albion W. 
Knight, Vice Chancellor of the University of the South, the first Bishop 
of Cuba and at present Bishop of the Panama Canal Zone, reached a 
climax in his baccalaureate sermon to the twenty-seven graduates of St. 
Mary's yesterday morning. Dr. Knight spoke from the words of St. Luke 
concerning Mary, the mother of Jesus, "Mary kept all these things in her 
heart and pondered them." By a peculiar coincidence the mother of Jesus 
was the subject of the sermon by Dr. J. M. Wells, delivered to the graduates 
of Peace Institute just a week before. In contrast, however, Dr. Wells spoke 
from that side of Protestantism that he said had neglected this wonderful 
woman, while Bishop Knight was speaking from that part of the church 
that has always glorified the life of Mary. He stated that he felt he was 
called to Raleigh to speak on Mary, here in the chapel of the school named 
for the mother of the Savior of mankind. 

FOUR CARDINAL VIRTUES. 

The four great virtues of Mary as set forth in the text were defined as 
those of mind, heart, faith and humility. Mary had the mind to grasp 
the wonderful things in the child life of Jesus; she had the heart in which 
to store them away, the faith, to accept and the humility not to take to 
herself the glory and boast herself as the mother of the God-child. Here 
was laid the lesson for the young women of today, to grasp and store in 
their hearts the riches of wisdom available to them, to have faith in the 
good things of life and to abstain from any vain boast. Too many mothers of 
today are hurrying their children into premature manhood and womanhood, 
or are allowing their sons and daughters to do so for themselves. These, 
likewise, are vain of the accomplishments of the child and make boast 
of his or her powers before the world. Simplicity of life was emphasized by 
the speaker, whose method of appeal could not have been more simple, yet 
withal deeply forceful in its simplicity. 

HOLDING THE MOTHER INFLUENCE. 

In this connection the Bishop recalled St. Luke's story of how Mary 
went back to search for her child, whom she had missed on the journey. 
How she found him in the temple, asking and answering questions of 
the most learned doctors of theology in all Israel. Mary did not proclaim 
her young boy a man, but told him he must come home with her and 



14 The St. Maey's Muse. 



his father. Mary wanted to keep her child under her influence as long as 
she could, even with the knowledge that he was none less than the Son 
of God Himself, that he might develop all His powers to the fullest maturity. 

"The story of the child life of Jesus is found nowhere else besides in the 
gospel of St. Luke. It should be noted that the opening chapters of St. 
Luke's gospel were written after the last. When St. Luke had written of 
the manhood and work of the Christ he began to think more, so he went 
back to the childhood days of the Master. He could have found the 
story nowhere else than from His mother. She had watched the growth 
of the Son and she had kept all these things in her heart. Today when a 
man attains greatness, the papers go back to his childhood days and write 
of the foundations of a successful life. Mary should be and is the typical 
example of motherhood for all who come after her. She was the greatest 
of all women. In her were combined four qualities of the true woman, 
the woman of mind, of heart, of faith, of humility. Let your lives be not 
contrary to the life of Mary." 

HOLD TO COLLEGE IMPRESSIONS. 
Dr. Knight here spoke of the preparation for life. He warned the young 
women that there was much danger of losing the college impressions in after 
life and he urged them that like Mary they keep these lessons in their 
hearts and ponder on them. The question they should ask themselves is: 
"In what way are we going to show to the world we are St. Mary's girls? 
If your heart is in the right place you will be prepared for any fate." 

FOR SIMPLEST LANGUAGE. 

Bishop Knight spoke for only about thirty minutes and his sermon con- 
tained not a heavy note — the heaviness that produces dullness ofttimes — 
and in its simple language and clear thought might have been followed 
with understanding by a child. His manner of address makes listening 
to his speech really a refreshing experience. 



Class Day Exercises 

Of all the Commencement exercises, the class day is naturally the 
dearest and most intimate for all, but particularly for the class whose 
special day it is. 

The girls of 1915 arranged an hour of delight and originality for 
their friends as well as fun and the closer drawing of bonds for each 
other, on that sunny May morning, Monday of Commencement 
week. The whole student body, except the Seniors, appeared in a 
long procession that wound around West Rock, coming from the 
direction of the Chapel and singing "In a Grove of Stately Oak 
Trees." Then from the door of East Rock came the twenty-seven 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



Seniors, bearing their long rope of daisies and marching through the 
arch of pine trees to their places on the lawn. Helen Peoples, class 
president, welcomed students and guests, and following this introduc- 
tion, Pencie Warren, Class Secretary, called the roll. The Class 
poem, by Courtney Crowther; the history, by Frances Strong, and 
the prophecy, by Elizabeth Lay, were next read. The prophecy was 
in the form of a poem and was very witty and amusing. It is printed 
in full in the Annual Muse. Lanie Hales read the last will and 
testament, which also provoked peels of laughter. 

"Helen Peoples then presented to the School in behalf of the Girls 
of 1915 a portrait of Miss Katie McKimmon, which was accepted 
for the School by Mr. Lay. 

The dedication of the Muse to Mr. Cruikshank was read and 
copies of the Muse were presented to Mrs. Iredell, Mr. Owen, Mr. 
Cruikshank and Miss Frances Bottum. 

Each class then sang its own particular song, beginning with the 

Preps and ending with the Seniors. After the songs (to close) the 

Seniors marched to the center of their circle where a large pot 

hung and deposited therein their pet aversion. 

"Round about the cauldron go 
In the horrid bug-bears throw. 
Chart of exercise I wist 
Pencie thinks doth head the list, 
Pairley follows with a measure, 
Such a tape is sure no treasure. 
Current History Helen hates, 
Margaret this abominates; 
Gyp this muffin and this toast, 
Monday's breakfast, let 'em roast. 
Thursday talks, recitals too 
These make Annie King boo boo. 
Elizabeth Lay this name disclaims, 
"Liz" is now gone up in flames. 
Carol, Oh she sleeps so well, 
In let's throw the rising bell. 
Cicero's thoughts about old age, 
How they make poor Courtney rage. 
When macaroni's seen by Hales 
The L. P.'s table then hears wails. 
And when Sadie sees a bean, 
Then her color turns pea-green. 



16 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Gladys' in exams a shark, 

But to burn them is a lark. 

Carrison's pet abomination, 

Practice halls her irritation. 

And what vexes Mattie Moye, 

Empty mail box she'll destroy. 

And Matilda's gladly brought, 

That dreaded Sunday morning "Thought. 

Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble, 
Hated task and loathsome food, 
Now the charm is firm and good. 
And from out this charmed pot 
Something good may yet be got; 
Beans will turn to ice cold tea; 
Practice Halls to harmony. 
Exercise we all have spurned 
Into moving pictures turned, 
Now the things that gave us pain 
Each has turned to some one's gain. 
So now about the cauldron sing, 
Nineteen fifteen in a ring; 
Enchanting all that we put in. 
Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 



Trje Art Exhibit 

The work of the Art Department was more than usually interesting 
this year. The fact that there were four certificate pupils, Florence 
Clarke, Annie Cameron, Nettie Gaither and Margaret Mann, added 
to the value of the exhibit. One of the most striking features of the 
exhibit was the charcoal drawings from life done by Elizabeth Lay 
and Constance Stammers, which were such remarkably good portraits 
that all who knew the models were astonished at the successful like- 
nesses. The clay casting of heads by Cornelia Waring and Elizabeth 
Lay also showed some portrait work that was very good indeed. 
Other good work was done by Augusta Howard and Gladys Jones- 
Williams, in water colors. The "Time Sketches" and original de- 
signs for leather work and for wall paper showed some clever ideas, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



and the advanced drawings from the antique were particularly good. 
Altogether the exhibit was an excellent one and showed the results of 
Miss Fenner's thorough training in a most gratifying way. 



Tf)e fllumnae Meeting 

The annual meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae Association was 
held the afternoon of Monday, May 24th, in the parlor at St. Mary's. 
The meeting was an interesting one, though small. After the min- 
utes of the 1914 meeting and the Treasurer's report, which is given 
later, the President, Mrs. Herbert Jackson, of Richmond, gave a 
short address in which she spoke of the general condition of the 
Association, the efforts made toward founding a chapter in Rich- 
mond and the outlook for the future. Miss Emilie McVea, of 
Cincinnati, was present and brought a report from Chapel Hill, where 
she was a recent visitor ; she also spoke of the need of an endowment 
fund for St. Mary's and of the means to awaken and further interest 
in the Alumnae Association. The New York and Chapel Hill Chap- 
ters reported that their members wished to go on record as desiring 
one or more women on the Board of Trustees before the close of 
the meeting. Mr. Lay came in at the request of the President and 
spoke to the Association. He emphasized the need of an adequate 
list of the ladies Alumnae, whose names are not preserved in the 
records. (The Raleigh Chapter is at present trying to compile as 
complete a list as can be gotten of these names, from 1842 to 1878). 
He also spoke of the help that the Alumnae outside of Raleigh could 
give to the School by trying to come in touch with girls who should 
be interested in St. Mary's, — letting St. Mary's know of these girls — 
a sort of advertising in the best sense. The Raleigh Alumnae were 
asked to attend the music recitals and other events of interest more 
than they have been accustomed to do. Mr. Lay closed by referring 
the members of the Association to his letter to the Alumnae printed 
in the May number of the Monthly Muse. 

After a further discussion of the plans for bringing of the Asso- 
ciation's resolution before the Board of Trustees, the meeting ad- 
journed. 
2 



18 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Later, Mrs. Shore made a motion that the General Association 
signify to the Trustees of the School in session the next day their 
desire for one or more women on the Board of Trustees. This mo- 
tion was largely discussed, but when put .to the vote was carried. 
A committee consisting of Mrs. Walter Montgomery, Mrs. Clarence 
Shore, Mrs. Walter Grimes and Mrs. W. W. Vass were appointed to 
appear before the Trustees at their meeting the next day and 
voice this resolution. 

The election of officers then took place and the officers for 1915-16 are as 
follows: 



President, Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh. 
Vice-President, Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 
Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon 



Treasurer, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank 

Members of Council. 
Mrs. Geo. Snow •» 
Miss Susen Iden f Tl11 1917 
Mrs. Chas. Baskerville 
Mrs. David Elias 
Miss E. W. McVea 
Miss Minnie Leary ' Vl " 



Report of tf}e Alumnae Treasurer 

Receipts: May 24, 1915. 

Balance in Bank, May 31, 1915 $229.46 

Dues, general association v . . . 6.00 

Scholarship Fund Raleigh Chapter 16.60 

Scholarship Fund New York Chapter 35.00 

Chapter dues $125.75 — as follows: 

Raleigh 79.50 

New York , 17.25 

Winston 3.00 

Edenton 3.50 

Asheville 13.00 

Elizabeth City 9.50 

Interest on Bonds 180.00 

Interest on Deposit 9.14 



$603.95 
Expenditures: 

Interest on Bonds paid to Beneficiaries $180.00 

Balance in Bank this date 423.95 

$603.95 



The St. Maky's Muse. 19 



Received since above report: 

New York Chapter $11.25 

Chapel Hill Chapter 8.00 

Mrs. Herbert Jackson 25.00 

Collected by Mrs. Jackson 7.00 

Mrs. C. E. Johnson 2.00 

Mrs. Leak 2.00 

Mrs. Iredell 1.00 



$55.25 



Margaret Cruikshank, Treasurer. 



TP)e Annual Concert 

Monday evening the Annual Concert was given in the Auditorium 
and was enjoyed by a large audience. We quote from the Neivs and 
Observer of the next day : 

The audience was just large enough to be comfortable and in a frame of 
mind to enjoy something of a high order. Every one of the nine numbers on 
the program, which lasted only an hour, was of that class. Probably the 
most notable triumph of the evening was enjoyed by Miss Frances Tillotson, 
a talented young lady from "the State of Minnesota. Her rendition of 
"Butterfly, Valse Chantee," from Gelli, was all that might have been desired. 
Her tones of the most appealing quality, her interpretation makes listening 
and looking a delight and the ease with which she reached the most difficult 
passages of this operatic work, combined with her charming manner, took 
the audience by storm. Encores were not in order, but the applause just 
wouldn't down, so she responded with a delightful short selection in a 
lighter vein. Two others who shared with Miss Tillotson the vocal honors 
of the program were Miss Margaret Thomas and Mr. H. C. Foreman. Miss 
Thomas displayed rare talent in the ease with which she sang "Habanera," 
from Carmen. She was heartily encored, and responded with a bow. Mr. 
1 Foreman proved that he has a tenor voice of no mean order by the manner 
i in which he rendered the beautiful ballad, "Come Back," by Miller. Two 
selections from Dvorak by Misses Agnes' Timberlake and Anna Belle King 
\ were well rendered. 

FINE WORK OF MR. OWEN. 

A distinct feature of the instrumental work was the accompanying of 
Prof. R. Blinn Owen. The success with which the work in voice was 
done was due to no small degree to his skillful playing. Miss Helen Wright, 
at the piano, was most pleasing. Other numbers of a fine order, rendered 
with understanding, were by Misses Hattie May Lasater, Mary Floyd, 
Adelyn Barbee and a violin trio by Misses Frances Sears, Marion Pickell 
and Muriel Abbott, with Miss Wright at the piano. Of this group the work 
of Misses Barbee and Floyd was particularly noticeable. 



20 The St. Maey's Muse. 



PROGRAM. 

1. "Aus dem Carneval" Grieg 

Miss Hattie Mat Lasatee 

2. "Echoes from Moravia" Dvorak 

(a) "The parting" 

(b) "The Wild Rose" 

Miss Anna Belle King, Miss Agnes Timbeblake 

3. Sonata, "Tragica," Op. 45 MacDowell 

Miss Maey Floyd 

4. "Habanera," from Carmen Bizet 

Miss Mabgabet Thomas 

5. (a) "Waltz," in E minor Chopin 

(b) "Deux Arabesque" Debussy 

(c) "Eagle" MacDowell 

Miss Adelyn Baebee 

6. "Come Back," ballade Miller 

Mb. H. C. Fobeman 

7. Concert Arabesques Schulz-Elver 

On Motifs by Johann Strauss 

Miss Helen Weight 

8. Butterfly, Valse Chantee Gelli 

Miss Frances Thlotson 

9. "March Nuptiale," Violin Trio Papini 

Misses Feances Seabs, Mabion Pickell, Mubiel Abbott 
Miss Helen Weight at the Piano 



The Rector's Reception 

Following the Annual Concert, all friends of the School, and 
particularly of the graduating Class were invited to the parlor 
where Mr. and Mrs. Lay, assisted by Miss Thomas, Bishop and 
Mrs. Cheshire and the twenty-seven graduates received them. The 
long line of young hostesses made an imposing array, and yet some- 
how their very number seemed to take all excessive formality 
from the occasion. 

The reception this year was an unusually large one, many of the 
relatives and friends of the graduating class were present, as well as 
many clergy and lay trustees of the School; and a most delightful 
hour was enjoyed by all. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



Address of Dr. Niles 

The Commencement speaker this year was, Dr. Charles Martin 
Niles, of Atlantic City, X. J., the giver of the Niles medal and an 
old friend of the School, who had already preached the sermon on a 
former Commencement. 

Dr. Niles said in part: 

"I do not know of any other school of its kind in the country thai 
is doing the real work St. Mary's is doing. Let it grow and go on 
just like the Old North State is going. We must never stand still." 
These were among the words of Dr. Charles Martin Niles, of Atlantic 
City, N. J., in his address to the graduates of St. Mary's yesterday. 
Speaking further of the many schools in the United States having 
the same name and conducted on a like basis, he said : "This school 
stands today at the very head of all. I have no object in saying 
this except that it is true." 

Like the sermon of Bishop Knight, Sunday, Dr. Niles talked in 
simple manner to the girls. That is what he did, talked, he gave not 
a lecture but a sympathetic talk. Dr. Niles was talking not only to 
St. Mary's girls, but of St. Mary's girls and for St. Mary's girls. 
In introducing him, Dr. Lay said it was highly appropriate that Dr. 
Niles should be here to talk to the school in which he has expressed 
his interest during the past ten years by being the donor of the medal 
for the highest honor in scholarship. This was presented by Dr. 
Niles to Miss Eliza Dickinson Davis, of Wilmington, who made a 
grand average of 95.8. The New Jersey preacher was free to admit 
that he had a fondness for St. Mary's and for North Carolina he 
never wished to get away from. Maybe it started several years ago 
when he said he found himself "like so many other men who have a 
peculiar feeling when they meet a North Carolina girl. She is at 
home now performing that highest domestic office, caring for our 
eight-months-old boy." She too, was a St, Mary's girl. 

The two leading St. Mary's in the country he said were at Burling- 
ton, N. J., and at Baleigh, and of the two Raleigh St. Mary's comes 
first. Speaking of the influence of St. Mary's girls on the life of the 
nation, he said in his sphere he had always found the New Jersey 



22 The St. Maey's Muse. 



St. Mary's girls and the Raleigh St. Mary's girls working side by 
side. He spoke warmly of the influence of the chapel services and the 
inculcation of ideals and recalled the words of William Ramsey: "JSTo 
nation can ever stand above the level of its women," Home and 
society of the nation have been uplifted by the influence of St. 
Mary's, he declared. 

Honor Held in Trust. 

"We are a people of ideals," he said. Rostand, the great French 
poet, has expressed himself recently in an apotheosis to the idealism 
of the American people. "Ideals depend on schools like this. We 
may not remember all the lessons of intellectual gymnastics, but 
don't forget all the accumulated honor of these past years is handed 
over to you. Say to yourself: 'I am the trustee of a great gift and 
must play fair.' You must be models for all who come after you. 
Mistakes won't prevent you from being such models, if they did you 
wouldn't be, for you will make mistakes. Be influenced only for 
the highest ideals of American womanhood. I recently heard that 
great American woman, Mrs. Funk, of Chicago, the well-known 
Suffrage leader, say : 'If there is anything I have to thank Grod for, 
it is for the American man.' See what you have got to live up to. 
But, now let me return the compliment, for I never meet with 
an occasion like this that I do not thank God for the American 
woman." 

Religious Influence Lingers. 

Speaking of the influence of the religious exercises of the school. 
Dr. ]N"iles said: "It is true we have students of other faiths and 
we are always glad to welcome them. But I would ask you to turn 
back in your thoughts in the years to come and see if you cannot 
truthfully say that St. Mary's chapel gave to you something of the 
best that is in your life. How many of you can go back to the first 
time your mother took you at her knee and taught you to say '~Now 
I lay me down to sleep.' It might not have been the first time 
she taught us our prayers that we remember, but the first time we 
recollect her as having done so will linger as long as life remains. 
Other things may slip out of our lives but we will never forget when 



The St. Maky's Muse. 23 



mother taught us prayers ; and every religious influence will stick. 
The definite object of your training at St. Mary's is to establish, a 
stronger Christian woman. Some one asked the President of the 
Republic of China the cause of the revolution that changed the 
status of one-fourth of the people of the globe and he replied: 'The 
fact that 125,000 Christian children in China will take their way 
to school tomorrow accounts for the Chinese Republic' " 

A People of Ideals. 

Turning again to a discussion of ideals, the speaker said : "Many 
Europeans come to this country and return and say pretty things 
about us, but they always add that after all the biggest thing is the 
almighty dollar. While it is true we have shown artistic production 
in its pursuit, the statement as a whole is untrue. We are a people 
of ideals." 

As he came toward the close ?i Dr. JNTiles turned to the under- 
graduates and admonished them to cherish the best ideals of St. 
Mary's. "Make up your mind if you don't like your teacher the 
trouble is with you." Then he turned again to the Seniors seated 
upon the stage and as if still talking to them, concluded by asking 
that the care of the Father follow them closely through life and 
to the end. 



Class Honors 

Two features of the program preceding the literary address were piano 
solos by Misses Mary Floyd and Hattie May Lasater, certificate students 
in piano. The other instrumental number, which was much enjoyed, was 
by Miss Adelyn Barbee. Mr. Lay announced that the custom of the school 
was that the one receiving the highest honors of the class should deliver the 
valedictory and the second highest the salutatory. First honors went to Miss. 
Margaret Edwards, who has led the class of 1915 for two years. Miss Helen 
Peoples, of Townesville, won second honors. Their papers were brevity in 
essence, but splendidly composed. The third honor of the class goes to that, 
young lady who writes the best essay, and this essay is read at commence- 
ment. Miss Virginia Bonner was the winner this year. She was prevented 
from reading her paper, "The Poet of Childhood," but this was admirably 
done by Miss Courtney Crowther, whose essay was next in merit. I Miss 
Frances Tillotson delighted all by singing an aria from "Robert il Diavolo." 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



FACTS ABOUT THE SENIOR CLASS. 

The student honors for the year were then announced by Mr. Lay and 
certificates were presented. Ho also gave some interesting facts about the 
Senior Class. The number is by fifty per cent the largest graduating in any 
one year. Four of the twenty-seven graduated from the Raleigh High 
School and completed the course at St. Mary's in two years. Four were 
from other high schools. Twelve of them are Raleigh girls, more than 
twice the number in any preceding class. Twenty-two of them are North 
Carolina girls. Their average is nineteen years and eight months, a 
youthfuless that justly entitles them to be known as "sweet girl graduates." 

The audience then repaired to the chapel, where diplomas were presented 
and goodbye said to the session of 1914-15. Here Bishop Cheshire made a 
farewell talk to the seniors and the benediction followed. The girls 
marched out with "Jerusalem High Tower," as a recessional hymn, and 
lined up in front of the main building in the shape of a crescent, as the 
procession of Clergy, Trustees and Bishops passed before them. 



A SurT)ri)er Nigbt 



A. S. C, '16. 

The fire-fly flits through the gloaming, 
And his wee shining spark is alight. 

The wind murmurs low in the hollows, 
Crooning wild, tender songs of the night. 

The stars, tiny lamplets are twinkling; 

The radiant moon is abeam, 
And meadow and fen-land are shimmering, 

In her pale, misty light all agleam. 

The meadows, dew-drenched breathe forth perfume, 

And afar o'er hollow and hill, 
Wind blown through the dim misty silence, 

Comes the cry of the lone wippoorwill. 

O'er all things a sweet stillness broodeth, 

The world is asleep and adream, 
While afar in the wide peaceful heavens, 

The moon and the bright starlets beam. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



The Commencemerjt Awards 



HONORS IN THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT 

Deserving Mention: 
For Penmanship: 

Elizabeth Barber 

Elizabeth Yates 
For Regular Attendance: 

Mary Peace 
For Deportment : 

Elizabeth Yates 

Evelyn Williams 

Sarah Benson 

Elizabeth Barber 

Honor Roll 

Sylbert Pendleton (95.5) 
Virginia Harrison Lay (95.3) 
Mary Peace (90.4) 
Dorothy Howard (90.0) 

HONORS IN THE LOWER PREPARATORY DEPART- 
MENT 
Honor Roll 
(Arranged in order of standing.) 

1. Mary Strange Morgan 

2. Elizabeth Baker 

3. Margaret Raney 

4. Adelaide Boylston 

5. Elizabeth Woolcott 

Deserving Mention: 
For not having missed a day or been tardy in two 
years : 

Elizabeth Cross (of the "A" Class) 

Certificates in the Business Department. 
In Bookkeeping only. 

Mary Blanche Alston Raleigh 

In Stenography and Typewriting. 

Mildred McKee Anderson Raleigh 

Lottie Blue Raleigh 

Nettie Martin Gaither Hertford, N. G. 

Grace Jeffreys Raleigh, N. C. 

Wirt Carrington Jordan South Boston, Va. 

Katherine MacNair Wilson, N. C. 



26 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Full Certificates. 

Julia Graham Jordan Raleigh 

Ellen Kownslar Mott (absent) Dixondale, Va. 

Alice Corinne "Wilson Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Ceetificates i:x Domestic Science. 

Edith Cheesborough Holmes Asheville, N. C. 

Helen Read Peoples Townesville, N. C. 

Certificates ix the Aet Department. 

Annie Sutton Cameron Hillsboro, N. C. 

Florence Clarke Middletown, N. C. 

Nettie Martin Gaither Hertford, N. C. 

Margaret Emma Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Certificates in the Music Department. 

In Piano. 

Mary Auning Floyd Timmonsville, S. C. 

Hattie May Lasater Raleigh, N. C. 

CLASS PROMOTIONS FOR 1915-16 

To be Seniors. 
Florence Elsie Alexander 
Katherine Wimberly Bourne 
Annie Sutton Cameron 
Eliza Dickinson Davis 
Mary Auning Floyd 
Selena Emma Galbraith 
Frances Royer Geitner 
Rena Hoyt Harding 
Susan Elizabeth Lamb 
Fannie Marie Stallings 
Josephine Saville Wilson 
Helen Cherry Wright 

To be Juniors. 

Buford King Aiken (37) 

Arlene Elizabeth Chester (31) 

Sarah Elizabeth Gold (37) 

Elmyra Jenkins ( 33 ) 

Alice Cohn Latham (34) 

Dorothy Shepherd Parker (37) 

Eva Irene Peel ( 30 ) 

To be Sophomores. 

Virgina Pope Allen (27) 

Elsbeth Gold Askew (23) 

Sarah Shellman Bacon (15) 

Emma Hudgins Badham (28) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 

Laura L. Beatty (17) 

Anna Lewis Boone (20) 

Sarah Elizabeth Borden (23) 

Violet Marie Bray (18) 

Frances Howe Cheatham (19) 

Elizabeth Mae Corbitt (21) 

Katharine Parker Drane (16) 

Jeanet Fairley (22) 

Elizabeth McMorine Polk (20) 

Margaret Albertson Griggs (19) 

Leila Ranes Hankinson (16) 

Caroline White Holmes (17) 

Prances Hunter Jenkins (20) 

Jessie Carter Lewis (16) 

Henrietta Marshall Morgan (15) 

Anne Huske Robinson (29) 

Nellie Cooper Rose (22) 

Alma Louise Spencer (15) 

Eleanor Relyea (23) 

Arabelle Toole Thomas (18) 

Rubie Logan Thorn (23) 

Margaret May Thomas (21) 

Jacksonia Watt (25) 

Emilye Davis To BE Feeshmen ' 

Ida Lee Edwards 
Margaret Freeman Huske 

THE HONOR ROLL 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire 
session and have been absent from no duty at any time 
during the session without the full consent of the Rector, 
and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular 
course of study or its equivalent, and must have carried 
this work to successful completion, taking all required 
examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each 
subject of at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very 
Good," (90 per cent) or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less 
than two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in 
punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



HONOR ROLL OF 1915 

1. Eliza Dickinson Davis, '16 95.8 (20) 

2. Margaret Alice Edwards, '15 95.6 (15) 

3. Elizabeth McMorine Folk, '18 94.7 (24) 

4. Annie Sutton Cameron, '16 94.4 (24) 

5. Emma Hudgins Badham, '18 94.3 (19) 

6. Katherine Parker Drane, '18 94.3 (20) 

7. Isabel Irma Dawson, '18 94.0 (18) 

8. Annie Huske Robinson, '18 ...93.8 (20) 

9. Agnes Hyde Barton, '15 93.2 (20) 

10. Florence Elsie Alexander, '15 92.6 (17) 

11. Helen Read Peoples, '15 92.3 (15) 

12. Mary Auning Floyd, '16 91.9 (20) 

13. Eva Irene Peel, '17 91.6 (19) 

14. Frances Lambert Strong, '15 91.4 (18) 

15. Eleanor Relyea, '18 91.3 (20) 

16. Lanie Stanton Hales, '15 91.3 (16) 

17. Florence Clarke, '15 91.2 (21) 

18. Violet Marie Bray 91.1 (18) 

19. Elizabeth Carrison, '15 91.0 (19) 

20. Margaret Emma Mann, '15 90.2 (20) 

21. Emma Louise Merritt, '15 90.1 (18) 

THE BISHOP PARKER BOTANY PRIZE 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by the Rt. 
Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New 
Hampshire, is awarded annually to that pupil who in 
accordance with certain published conditions does 
the best work in the preparation of an herbarium. 

This year this Botany Prize was awarded to 
Eva Irene Peel, '17, of Williamston, IS". C. 

THE NILES MEDAL 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was in- 
stituted by Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D.D., in 
1906. It is awarded to the pupil who has made the 
best record in scholarship and de|)ortment during the 
session. 

The medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The pupil must have taken throughout the 
year at least "15 points" of regular work; and have 



The St. Maky's Muse. 29 



satisfactorily completed this work, passing all re- 
quired examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been "Excellent 1 ' in De- 
portment. 

( 3 ) The pupil must have taken all regular general 
courses assigned and have done satisfactory work in 
them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the 
College Department. 

This year, the tenth award of the Niles Medal was 
made to 

Eliza Dickinson Davis, of Wilmington, 1ST. C, 
of the Junior Class. 

THE GRADUATES 

The College Class of 1915. 

Mattie Moye Adams Durham, N. C. 

Agnes Hyde Barton Hartford, Conn. 

Virginia Lucile Bonner Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum Penland, N. G. 

Elizabeth Carrison Camden, 8. C. 

Florence Clarke Middletown, N. C. 

Carol Gresham Collier Goldsboro, N. C. 

Courtney DeForrest Crowther Savannah, Ga. 

Margaret Alice Edwards Raleigh, N. C. 

Dorothy Shaw Pairley Rockingham, N. C. 

Lanie Stanton Hales Wilson, N. C. 

Matilda Jordan Hancock New Bern, N. C. 

Maude Delma Hotchkiss Raleigh, N. C. 

Gladys Elizabeth Jones-Williams Montevallo, Ala. 

Anna Belle King Louisbnrg, N. C. 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay Raleigh, N. C. 

Edna Earle Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Edith Matilda Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Emma Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Emma Louise Merritt Raleigh, N. C. 

Helen Read Peoples Townesville, N. C. 

Florence Douglas Stone Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Lambert Strong Raleigh, N. C. 

Allene Estelle Thornburgh Raleigh, N. C. 

Sadie Walton Vinson Littleton, N. C. 

Pencie Creecy Warren Edenton, N. C. 

Gladys Eccles Yates West Raleigh, N. C. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Trje Graduatior) Honors 



THE SALUTATORY 

Helen Read Peoples 
We have heard it said so often that St. Mary's girls love St. 
Mary's more than any other girls love their school. Some people 
may think that we just say that without meaning it, hut we girls 
of 1915 who have been here for two, or three, or four years, realize 
how intensely we do mean it when we speak of "Beloved St. Mary's." 
There are many things of our daily life which tie us together and to 
the St. Mary's ideal which we cannot share with others, and yet there 
are many which would be of no meaning if they were not shared. 
And of these things which we love but which need the participation 
of others to give to them enjoyment and meaning to us, this Com- 
mencement occasion is the chief. How glad I am therefore, that to 
me has been given the privilege of welcoming to our graduation, the 
Hector, and dear lady principal, the trustees, our schoolmates, 
parents and friends, who have come here today. It is a very great 
pleasure to us to welcome each and every one of you. 



THE CLASS ESSAY 
"The Poet of Childhood" 
Virginia Ltjcile Bonner 

"As from the house your mother sees 
You playing round the garden trees; 

So you may see, if you will look 
Through the windows of his book, 

Another child, far, far away, 
And in another garden play." 

Robert Louis Stevenson is the poet of childhood. He understood 

child nature and had the deepest sympathy for it. He was keenly 

alive to the terrors, the nameless, half -formed, secret fears that break 

in upon that shadowy land of unreality in which the child lives. 

The little ones have their being in an enchanted land, a land of 

giants and fairies, of castles and steeds galloping in the wind. The 

adult world appears very grotesque to them ; they do not understand 

those strange beings who break up their play so rudely, who are 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 



at times so lavish in their endearments and again, so brutal in 
their lack of sympathy. In the breast of Robert Louis Stevenson, 
; there were memories of the childish heart that would not be out- 
| grown. Towards one person, at least, he felt himself always a 
child — to Alison Cunningham — his life long nurse, whom he always 
called "Cummy," his childish name for her. It was to this faithful 
woman that he dedicated his little volume, a A Child's Garden of 
Verse," as a feeble return for the innumerable sacrifices she had 
made for him when a sick child. His gratitude is touchingly shown 
in his tribute to her as "My Second Mother, My First Wife, the 
Angel of My Infant Life." 

His love and appreciation of all children is evident in his 
verses ; the spirit of the lines is essentially that of the child. "It 
is but a child of air, that lingers in the garden there." The child 
has its being in the land of imagination. At night, the bed appears 
to him, a little boat into which he is helped by nurse ; the sheet is a 
sailor's cloak. He says good-bye to all his friends on shore, shuts 
i his eyes and sails away in the dark. All night, he steers across 
the dark and morning finds him once more in his room, his vessel 
fast beside the pier. This day sees many exciting, frightful adven- 
tures. Three of the sailors are afloat in the basket on the great 
meadow, the wave-like grass is blowing in the wind. The brave 
crew is off to Malabar. Suddenly they spy a pirate squadron a-rowing 
on the sea, the cattle, a-charging with a roar. With great rapidity, 
they escape into a harbor nearby. "The wicket is the harbor and the 
garden is the shore." When the excitement of this daring adventure 
has subsided, our little child climbs up into the cherry tree and 
"looks abroad on foreign lands." O the wonderful sights that it sees, 
places that it never has dreamed of before ; the beautiful next door 
garden, filled with flowers, the river full of little ripples, the long, 
white dusty road with strange people going into town. If it could 
only find a higher cherry tree, where it could look, farther and 
farther, into Fairyland. 

"Where all the children dine at five, 
And all the play things come alive." 



32 The St. Maey's Muse. 



The pleasantest thing that this dream child can do is to go up in 
the swing — "up in the air and down" — up so high that the brown 
roofs look so far away and the cattle look so little and it thinks, 
before it comes flying down again, it can at least get a glimpse into 
that mysterious land away at the end of the road. Our little child 
can not really, truly go abroad into foreign lands, but it can wander 
at will in the dear land of picture books. It is his chief delight on 
winter days when the streams are frozen and the birds are gone, to 
find these things put by in the picture story books. In the fire, too, 
if one looks closely enough, there are armies marching by tower and 
spire, the phantom city is burning, and the "blue even slowly falls 
about the garden trees and walls," The little spirit is deliciously 
tired with such a busy, adventurous day and as it again embarks in 
the tiny boat for the pleasant land of nod, a pleasing stupor possesses 
it and it thinks drowsily: 

"The world is so full of a number of things, 
I'm sure we shall all be as happy as kings." 

JSTot only in writing these verses for children, these verses telling 
of the wonderland where children so often roam, did Stevenson 
bring to our minds the pleasant memories of childhood but he was 
always doing something to make the children around him happy. 
The garden in which he lived, was ever a. garden of sickness and 
pain but he kept the flowers of cheer and mirth alive in it and he 
sent these freely to his many, many friends. He was never too 
busy or too ill to answer letters from loving little children who wrote 
to him in appreciation of the wonderful stories he wrote for boys. 
His own little stepson, Lloyd Osbourne, to whom he dedicated his 
story, "Treasure Island," was devoted to this sympathetic companion 
of his childhood days. At one time, in California when the poet j 
was in delicate health, he was a devoted nurse to the child of his! 
landlady. He was so affected by the pain that this little one suffered 
and so wrought up with anxiety over it, that he gave up all hope forj; 
children of his own. His health broke down for several months as a 
result of the strain he went through. Unique among his kindnesses 
to children, was the gift of his birthday to little Annie Ide, thel 






The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



daughter of Judge Ide from Vermont, wlu> was at that time Ameri- 
can land commissioner in the Samoan islands,. Unfortunately, 
this little girl was born on Christmas Day and was thus deprived 
of having a real birthday. Hearing the story, as he sat with friends 
one evening on his great veranda in the far away Pacific island, he 
was quite touched and proposed that he should will her his birthday 
as he was getting along in years. The father was pleased with the 
idea. Accordingly, a few months later, little Annie received a 
really-truly will, written strictly in the manner of wills, with due 
regard to Scotch and English legal terms, in which Stevenson formally 
bestowed on her the lifelong right to his birthday, the thirteenth of 
November, to be celebrated with "due feasting and sporting of fine 
raiment." There was the condition attached to the will, that if the 
requirements were not strictly kept, the will should revert to the 
President of the United States. Of course, the little girl was im- 
mensely pleased and kept the conditions to the letter. The two 
became fast friends. Annie Louisa, as she called herself after the 
I gift, celebrated her new birthday in many places * and under many 
different conditions, each time having the will read twice, she held the 
celebration in Stevenson's own home, Vailima. 

Perhaps the most charming of Stevenson's works are his personal 
letters, so genial, so cheerful and friendly are they. They rarely 
j contain facts. Indeed, his friends seem to have complained of this, 
1} and yet should they have done so ? For he wrote in his letters the best 
lot the thoughts that were in his mind, and today many enjoy those 
; letters as much, perhaps, as his most intimate acquaintances. 

When Stevenson felt himself forced to go as a voluntary exile 
.to the far away island — Samoa — he began an absolutely new mode 
, of life. However, he still remained the poet of childhood ; I think the 
I Samoan natives, whom we may think of as but grown-ups with chil- 
L dren's hearts and gratefulness, appreciated him even more than 
[ we. They made him chief of their clan, looking upon him as a 
j supreme being, a sort of god. He was a good neighbor, a loyal 
f; friend to them, and above all, "Tusitala," the teller of tales. So 
L great was their gratitude to him for the aid he gave them in political 
3 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 



troubles, that they built a long road up to his beautiful estate and 
called it the "Road of the Loving Hearts." They put up this in- 
scription on a board : 

"Considering the great love of His Excellency, Tusitala, in his 
loving care of us in our tribulation in the prison, we have made 
this great gift; it shall never be muddy, it shall go on forever, this 
road that we have dug." 

Then when the man with the boy-heart died, the morning after, 
about forty of the faithful natives cut a path up the difficult, pre- 
cipitous side of the mountain in the rear of his house where he had 
expressed a desire to take his final rest. Later in the day he was 
bourne to the summit with much exertion by his loyal chiefs. There, 
on the small level top of the mountain, facing the sea, he was laid 
in his final resting place; — Tusitala, "The King of the Road of the 
Loving Hearts." The noble poet of childhood sings his own Requiem 
in words that any boy might love: 

"Under the wide and starry sky, — 
Dig the grave and let me lie. 
Glad did I live and gladly die, 
And I laid me down with a will. 

"This be the verse that you grave for me; 
Llere he lies where he longed to be ; 
Home is the sailor, home from the sea, 
And the hunter, home from the hill." 



THE VALEDICTORY 

Margaret Alice Edwards. 

Time and time again we have been told that "school days are the 
happiest days of one's life," but we couldn't be brought to believe it. 
That might have been so for our fathers and mothers but it cer- 
tainly didn't apply to us. How could it be when school work was so 
hard and examination and bug-bears ? 

Now, however, as the time draws near for us to leave the protecting 
shelter of St. Mary's and go out into the world to take up our lives 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 



there, we begin to realize the truth of the old saying. So it is with 
regret that we go from this our Alma Mater, with all it stands for, 
looking hack upon the years spent here, we find them filled with joy- 
Each spot is hallowed with memories of hours of quiet happiness ; 
things once thought to be difficult no longer seem so ; the girls and 
other friends who have done so much to fill our school life with joy 
grow dearer with thought of separation. We see now that the 
teachers understood our attitude and were most wisely directing us, 
setting before us, by their example, a high standard of manhood and 
womanhood. For them we have only love and gratitude for their 
unfailing kindness and untiring help in all our work. 

For our Alma Mater herself, who has given us such a high ideal, 
one that we shall carry with us through the coming years, there is in 
our hearts only love and loyalty, and joined, with it is a great 
sorrow as we bid her farewell. May God bless her and keep her 
evermore. 

THE SECOND SENIOR ESSAY 
"Mudpuddles" 

Courtney deforest Crowther. 

It is not only in the rose, 

It is not only in the bird, 
Not only where the rainbow glows 

Nor in the song of woman heard, 
But in the darkest, meanest things 

There always, always something sings. 

Is not this the true music, the real music ? If this music pleases 
the ear, all else is ephemeral ; you have life's philosophy and the 
worth while philosophy that will never never fail you. "Gather ye 
rose-buds while ye may" is a very excellent philosophy while it 
lasts but rose-buds will wither, will they not? And how about the 
winter months when there are no rose-buds to gather? The most 
beautiful life is like a jewel set in a somber setting. Let the dark 
and gloomy things be a background for the brightest jewel, optimism, 
and watch it glisten and sparkle the most scintillating of them all. 
But why philosophize over such a commonplace subject as mud- 
puddles ? Do not think tho', that when I say commonplace I under- 
estimate them, for if I could but combine in one man such a silver 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



tongued crator as was Nestor, an optimist like Emerson, the force 
of Carlyle, the fiery idealism of Shelley, such an infinite under- 
standing of human nature as was Shakespeare's, with the wistful 
sympathy which Lamb had for commonplace things, then perhaps, 
and only then, could this man, equipped in such a way, do full 
justice to the exalted theme — mudpuddles. Unfortunately I fear 
none of us, even tho' we were equipped with the lantern of Diogenes 
and endowed with the perpetual motion of a small boy could unearth 
this phenomenon of a man, so I in my humble way will merely point 
out a few kinds of mudpuddles that I have seen or heard of within 
my limited experience, for there are many numbers, kinds and sorts 
of mudpuddles, and yet a great many more offsets and recompenses 
for them. Such a wondrous variety of mudpuddles ! Why there are 
material, historical, national and individual mudpuddles. 

Material mudpuddles are what people usually mean by just mud- 
puddles, but they are the least of them all. Every refreshing drop 
of rain that is so fortunate as to fall into a mudpuddle sinks in with 
a charmed gurgle and contented sigh, for now it can join congenial 
playfellows even tho' they are of the earth — earthy. And if this 
raindrop has a heart, I am sure it is singing with all its heart, "I 
am not now in Fortune's power; I, that am down, can sink no 
longer." Without mudpuddles there would be no pulsating, verdant 
life of spring exquisite in her beauty, personifying the magnificent 
yet delicate shades of thought of the great Artist Creator, which are 
expressed to us lucky mortals in her being. The lover is a mud- 
puddle, and she is spring, a maid whose hair is full of golden lights, 
her eyes full of laughter and her lap full of flowers, and Romance 
comes riding by with a brook chuckling its sunlit way beside him. 
"Tis in the early morning of the year when all the world glows and 
glimmers like spirits of fire imprisoned in frozen dew-drops. Then 
as the morning grows older and color and life grow rampant in all 
things of nature, men go forth to forge in the smithy of life, feeling 
that they are no longer just entitled to life liberty, and his pursuit 
of poverty, but to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," for 
all the world is wealthy and all men may woo the spring — 'Tis all 
because of mudpuddles. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 



Did Walter Raleigh realize that such a seemingly insignificant 
thing as a mudpuddle could make his name, now never to be for- 
gotten, echo thru history as the quintessence of chivalry \ To he 
sure, she was a queen, and he, no doubt, a most excellent gentleman, 
but the really great thing was the mudpuddle. Being so unassuming, 
it does not ring thru the annals of history; it is only mentioned as 
an almost non-relative incident when it should be the other way 
around. 'Tis the way of the world tho — the people who deserve 
the rewards and honors never get them, and so the pages of history 
only serve to tantalize and antagonize fair minded folks — for that 
was a distinctly historical mudpuddle. 

Another figurative mudpuddle which surely made history was 
the exiling of Dante from his native home, Florence. More than 
likely, but who can tell, that burning genius would never have sung 
to the world "the mystic unfathomable song" with its pictures "woven 
as out of rainbows on a ground of eternal clouds, his "Inferno," if it 
had not been for his struggle against this oppressing burden of 
sorrow, — this mudpuddle. 

"Heaven but tries our virtue by affliction, 

As oft the cloud that wraps the present hour 
Serves but to lighten all our future days." 

When national mudpuddles are mentioned, perhaps the first one 
we think of is Russia and her lamentable condition ; then we must 
consider that thru such a foul and ugly thing the most wonderful 
variety and exquisite presentment of music the world has ever 
known has been produced — How it fascinates ! The weird melodies 
of it, its peculiar rhythm, its strange and at times bizarre harmonies, 
how they touch the pathetic side of our natures, and why ? Because 
it is the soul of the Russian people exposed in her music which 
speaks to us : music, profound in its melancholy, which many cen- 
turies of hardship and oppression have brought forth. Is not music, 
after all, of and from the heart ? Words may lie, but music never. 

"Tis in the mud and scum of things 
There always, always something sings." 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Individual mudpuddles are perhaps the reallest of them, all for 
they come nearest home. They may be in the shape of disappoint- 
ments, sorrows, cares or what not, but no matter how deep and impass- 
able they may seem, they have their recompenses — the good things 
which naturally must follow in their wake If one suffers, he must 
gain keen sympathy, and sympathy wins friends more quickly than 
anything else and just the pure, delicious joy of having friends brings 
wholehearted laughter. With them, these precious friends, a man is 
so unafraid of events that the very stars in their courses will fight 
for him. 

If sleep is the half-brother of death, then mudpuddles can claim 
laughter for their half-sister. How insufficient the one without the 
other! "Grief may endure for a night but joy cometh in the morn- 
ing," and with joy comes laughter. If the tragic spirit is always 
hovering over us, always the comic spirit, which is thei spirit of 
laughter, is there, and a rough and ready and everyday sort of spirit 
it is. It is above us and beneath us — it is of us. Even from the 
worst mudpuddles, little mischievous elves stretch forth their tiny 
fists eager to punch mortals' cheeks and tickle their lips and all they 
ask for reward is a smile, a laugh, or a chuckle. To help them in 
their happy work of making others laugh, there are human fun- 
makers. For their laughter to be contagious, irresistible — it must 
come from a heart that has experienced sorrows and known mud- 
puddles. A man who knows only laughter is more or less of a fool, 
but he who has been thru mudpuddles and comes out smiling, is 
the man who is capable of making us laugh. The funmaker has 
his reward when he stands before thousands of people and sees a 
smile break thru the adamantine line of their countenances, watches 
it stretch, spread, and surge into a chuckle, rise and twinkle in 
a thousand eyes and finally burst forth into a crescendo of irrepressi- 
ble merriment. Then the comedian really lives, then he rides the 
upper air ; then he is a conqueror beside whom Christopher Columbus 
is a scared adventurer, afraid to go home, and Xapoleon a little 
man with a frown. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price ********* One Dollar. 

Single Copies ******** Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnee, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberly Bourne, '16 \ Rlis , inps ,„ Manairprq 

Fannie Marie Stallings, '16 J J^ 3111633 Managers 



EDITORIAL 



With this issue another volume of the Muse is begun under a 
new Board of Editors. Of course we are ambitious as our prede- 
cessors have been to make a good showing for the Muse, for the 
Alumnae, and for St. Mary's. 

We need help to make the Muse the success it should be and the 
help of the friends of the Muse and of the School will be very greatly 
appreciated. The Girls like to have the news of their years at the 
School in permanent form ; the Alumnae likes to keep in touch with 
the School, to know what is going on, and to learn the news of their 
old friends. 

Our needs are not new or peculiar to this year. We need sub- 
scriptions to the Muse to supplement the funds raised from our 
friends who advertise. It takes money, and what to us is a con- 
siderable sum, to get out ten good copies of the magazine properly 
printed, bound and illustrated. We need news notes from the 
Alumnae to keep us in touch with them and to enable us to furnish 
their friends with news of them. And from the present day girls in 
School we need the stories, the verse, and the sketches, and well 
written news to enable us to give them what they want. 



40 The St. Maby's Muse. 



We dream of some day standing inconspicuously behind the mail- 
line on the evening when a new Muse is distributed and instead 
of that too familiar "Only a Muse" to hear a delighted chorus of 
"even better than a letter — The Muse!" Who is going to help us to 
realize our dream ? 



The fall program of student events gives every indication of all 
the usual pleasure to supplement the School work. Last year's 
class will be — and is — missed. It was a very efficient class as well 
as "A jolly good Class." But this year brings its special opportunity 
to the Class of 1916. At St. Mary's the Seniors are not exclusive; 
they realize their responsibilities but they also wish every girl, down 
to the "tiny, baby Prep" to feel that she is a very real part of the 
School and that she has her responsibilities too. We want to make 
this year the best of years for all of us — its. work and its play. 
Literary Societies, Athletics, Auxiliary Chapters — each organization 
needs the earnest interest of each of its members. We all hear 
very often of the high standard of the "St. Mary's Girl" ; we all 
appreciate the high example of the "St. Mary's Girls" who have 
gone before us. It is for us this year to live up to the standards of 
St. Mary's. 

Is every St. Mary's Girl of 1915-16 awake to the opportunity and 
to the responsibility ? 



It seems a rather late date to be printing the account of Commence- 
ment but we hope that the readers of the Muse will not pass over the 
pages of this account without seeing in it the purpose of its publica- 
tion, apart from the importance of retaining the record in printed 
form. The Commencement Exercises are the climax of the year. 
They combine the record of achievement, with the exhibition of ac- 
complishment, and the word of encouragement. 

"Mies Medal," "Honor Roll," "Class Promotions" should be in 
mind throughout the year even though we hear of them chiefly at 
Commencement. "Annual Concert," "Commencement Play," even 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 

"Class Day Exercises" mark the end of a season of much enjoyed 
work, but of work nevertheless, in their respective lines. 

The new girls are not as familiar as the old with the meaning of 
"Literary Society Receptions," "Hallowe'en Entertainments," 
"Christmas Tree Night," "Inter-Society Debates," "Inter-Class Par- 
ties," "Junior-Senior Party" and "School Party" as they will be 
later. We want them to think something about them now. 

But more. The Annual Sermon and the Annual Address sound 
the word of appreciation and of encouragement from without and 
Bishop Knight and Dr. Niles spoke those words strongly last Com- 
mencement. The Salutatory and the Valedictory express in bri'ef 
student feeling that lies close to the heart of the St. Mary's Girl 
in her serious moments. The 1915 Commencement was a time of 
great interest to those of us who had part in it. We hope the account 
of it even tho belated will quicken the interest in St. Mary's for 
all those who read it. 



Th)e Opening 

On Thursday morning, September 16, at nine o'clock the annual 
opening service was held in the Chapel. We, the new girls and the 
old, came in singing, "Ancient of Days." Mr. Hunter and Mr. 
Ingle were with Dr. Lay and Bishop Cheshire in the chancel. Our 
Rector, Dr. Lay, held the service while Bishop Cheshire made his 
customary opening address. He welcomed us in behalf of the 
trustees and made us all feel at home by offering his personal friend- 
ship and help to each, but the special message for us was, Do what- 
ever you undertake with all your might. After the benediction we 
ended the service by singing, "Ten thousand times Ten thousand." 

K. W. B. 



Th><2 OpeQing Receptioq 

The opening reception given by the old girls to the new girls on 
Saturday evening was a most pleasant beginning of the social events 
of the year. 



42 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Cards were made out for progressive conversation and for dancing. 
Punch was served in the Muse Room, which was attractively decora- 
ted in goldenrod and ferns, and later in the evening delightful ice- 
cream and cakes were served. The reception afforded excellent 
(opportunities for the making of new acquaintances and the old girls 
were most glad to welcome both the new girls and the new teachers. 

M. A. F. 



With) tbe Class of 1915 

Among the class of 1915 there is certainly a diversity of occupa- 
tions. First of all, the class possesses three teachers, Helen Peoples, 
who is teaching at home, Carol Collier in Durham and Matilda Han- 
cock, who is substituting in New Bern. 

Two have not yet laid down the role of student. Elizabeth Lay 
is taking a graduate course at St. Mary's in preparation for entering 
Barnard next Fall, and Gyp Barton is at the University of North 
Carolina taking a special French course in preparation for teaching 
that subject later. 

The one nurse is Florence Clarke, who is in training at St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital in Norfolk. 

Frances Strong took a business course this summer and we hear 
that she is helping her father in his law office. 

We are glad to learn that Helene jSTorthcott is much better and 
expects to come to St. Mary's after Christmas. 

We have heard no news from Gladys Jones-Williams, but hope she 
will have a pleasant winter wherever she is. 

Quite a number of the "Fifteeners" are at home this winter. 
Among them are Anna Belle King, Sadie Vinson, Pencie Warren, 
Lanie Hales, Gladys Yates, Allene Thornburg, Maud Hotchkiss, 
Elizabeth Carrison, Dorothy Fairley, Louise Merritt, Edith Mann, 
and Mattie Moye Adams. 

We are very glad to welcome back among us Margaret Bottum, 
who is helping Mr. Cruikshank in the office; Florence Stone who is 
taking voice lessons and Virginia Bonner, and Margaret and Edna 
Mann who are taking the business course. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 43 



And last but by no means least, Margaret Edwards, or we 
should say, Mrs. Nowell, is at her new home in Wake Forest, where 
I am sure we all wish her every happiness. 

This ends the roll of the Class of 1915. They are scattered in 
all directions, occupied in all sorts of activities, but there is. one 
thing we can say about them all, in common, we miss them dreadfully 
and we wish there could be some sort of graduate course that they 
could all come back and take so that we could have them with us 
again. 



Also Personal 

The Class of 1916 mourns the loss of three of its members. 

Eliza Davis has entered Kadcliffe where we wish her a happy 
year and are sure of her success. 

Elsie Alexander has moved to St. Louis and has entered Washing- 
ton University. Although we miss her dreadfully, we are very glad 
she is so pleased with her new home. 

We wish Kate Lois Montgomery a happy and successful year at 
Converse and wish she could have come back to graduate with us. 

How much we do miss Arabelle Thomas was shown by the joy 
with which she was received and the pleasure all her old friends 
have taken in her visit. She will be at home in Charlotte this win- 
ter and we hope she will come to see us as often as she can. 

Everybody was glad to have Helen Peoples with us for a few days 
at the opening of School and we all enjoyed Lanie's little visits 
while she was staying in town. 



"Describe water, Johnny," said the teacher. 

"Water" explained Johnny, "is a white fluid that turns black when you put 
your hands in it." — Exchange. 



44 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SOME VACATION TRIPS 



Corr)n)er)cemer)t ir> New England 

(Florence Stone's Trip to the Harvard Commencement as reported by Mr. Stone) 

Mr. Stone and Florence had a lovely time on their Northern trip. 
They left Ealeigh on June 11, and took the boat to Boston finding a 
very pleasant company, among whom were Mrs. Lay and Ellen on 
their way to St. Paul's School for a visit. 

The first afternoon in Boston they went to the Art Museum, seeing 
numbers of the pictures that we see copies of in the magazines as 
well as old Rembrandt's, Egyptian Sarcophaguses and many others. 
From the Art Museum they went to the Arnold Arboretum where the 
rhododendrons of all colors and shades were in full bloom, as well as 
the azaleas and many other beautiful flowers. Florence had the 
misfortune to have her trunk misshipped from Norfolk, but, although 
it was six days late in reaching her, this did not at all dampen her 
pleasures or enthusiasm. She and Mr. Stone made their headquar- 
ters with relatives in Belmont, near the beautiful Oakley Country 
Club, where Mr. Stone had an invitation to play golf. A delightful 
evening was spent with a classmate of Mr. Stone's in a house where 
Mrs. Classmate was born. She is of the seventh generation to be 
born in that home. At night they attended the Senior reception 
at Radcliffe, where the grounds were made beautiful with lanterns, 
lighted, by the way, by electricity, and where there were hundreds of 
people with music and dancing. Another night was spent at Groton, 
Mass., where they attended the finals at Lawrence Academy and saw 
the buildings at Groton School with the beautiful Chapel, a memorial, 
among others, to Mr. Stone's classmate, Joseph Peabody Gardiner. 
Returning to Boston by automobile they passed through Concord 
and saw the bridge where "the embattled farmers" stood ; Emerson's 
Manse, Louisa Alcott's home, the house where the "Little Women" 
lived, and then the Common at Lexington where the battle took place. 

Mr. Stone has given an interesting description of the rest of his 
trip. 

Another day we spent at Northboro and drove out to the Wachesett 
Dam that makes a lake eleven miles long (occupying the site of three 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 



former towns) to supply Boston, forty miles away with water. The Dam 
itself is 207 feet high and the water at the Dam is 125 feet deep, about 
three times as high as our Main Building. 

Class Day at Harvard was a memorable event, for we went to a number 
of spreads, the largest one in the Hasty Pudding Club' Building where 
there was dancing in the theater. The most unique spread was in the very 
attractive Club House of the Lampoon, the "Life" of Harvard, where Mr. 
Martin, the editor of "Life," did his maiden work. Class Day afternoon 
we went with thousands of others over the beautiful Anderson bridge to 
the Stadium for the Ivy Oration, etc. Representatives) of all the classes 
marched in procession, the younger classes holding special reunions in odd, 
striking costumes. The seats with some twenty thousand people were bright 
with all sorts of colors in ladies' costumes, and as a final event the visitors 
cast to the winds myriads of streamers of various colors, and confetti. At 
night there was dancing in Memorial Hall and fascinating singing by 
the Glee Club on the steps of the New Widener Library. 

On Commencement, I met with my class in our special room in Hols- 
worthy and lived over old times for an hour or so, lunched at the Chief 
Marshal's spread, marched in the procession in which the graduates marched 
in order of their classes from 1840 down, and at night attended a class 
dinner at the University Club in Boston, with fifty-eight members present. 
As there was one man present from a further distance than I, I was saved 
the ordeal of making a speech. 

We spent two days among the hills that give Vermont its name and our 
last two days were spent with a classmate, a well-known professor of 
biology, at his home on an island on the Maine coast with the, Isle of 
Shoals in view, eight miles out to sea, where we saw the grave of Champer- 
non, the nephew of Sir Ferdinand Gorges, whose sister was the mother 
of Sir Walter Raleigh. 



We Who Wer)t 

Arabella Thomas. 

Miss Thomas' party started from Charlotte on July 31st, and 
although our spirits were a little daunted over the thought of leaving 
home, and although the mercury climbed the thermometer until 
it reached the 102nd degree, and even if "'No. 36" was two and a 
half hours late, we finally started off on our much thought of Western 
trip. 

We traveled continuously for five days until we reached the Grand 
Canyon. ~No one could ever rightly describe the grandeur of the 
Canyon. Its vastness, its marvellous and awe-inspiring beauty 



46 The St. Mary's Muse. 



creates an impression upon the visitor that is different from any 
other. 

Riverside, California, was our first night stop. Very few tourists 
schedule this in their itinerary, but due to our ever thoughtful 
chaperone we were fortunate in stopping over. The place at which 
we stayed did not at all resemble a! modern hotel. It was just like 
an Old Spanish Mission. Everywhere you turned you found little 
new corners and places that exactly fitted the atmosphere of the 
place. We, of course, proceeded to fall in love with the Inn and said 
goodbye with regret to the nice people who treated us as guests whom 
they were delighted to entertain. 

The San Diego Exposition was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone 
the whole time we were there. The buildings themselves are built 
in the Spanish style and with the varicolored flowers the whole was 
most attractive. Of course the Exposition was on a much smaller 
scale than the San Francisco Exposition, and although it was not as 
wonderful yet at the same time you could come nearer "taking it all 
in" and could therefore enjoy it the more. 

The San Francisco Exposition is so extensive and so full of in- 
teresting things that if you stayed a year you could still see some- 
thing different every day. The buildings are themselves an educa- 
tion. The illumination photographed on your memory is a picture 
long to be remembered. You left with a, sense of much grandeur, 
bigness and wonder, but out of the confused picture rose one of the 
Exposition that will be a perpetual source of pleasant reference 
and thought. 

We were given five days in the Yellowstone Park and although 
we were beforehand warned of the dust and long tiresome all-day 
drives, we were pleasantly disappointed. The "Geyserland" we 
thought very amusing and even ludicrous. "Old Faithful" was a 
wonderful sight and unless your nerves were properly tuned they 
would be very often put to a hard test. "The Black Growler" in 
particular, greeted you from afar with groans and rumblings that 
made you hasten away. 

The month passed only too fast and before we knew it we were 
at our destination. Our party was a very congenial one and it is 



The St. Mary's Muse. 47 



needless to say here, where all who read will heartily agree with 
me, that our trip was tlie most successful and most enjoyable be- 
cause of the unfailing patience and thoughtfulness of our chaperone. 
We only wished that she could have had more rest and more "of a 
holiday" but we trust that she will rest now and in the near future 
consent to take us on another "most wonderful trip." 

At the Exposition 

At the Panama Pacific Exposition this summer, St. Mary's was 
well represented. Besides Miss Thomas' party, consisting of Ara- 
belle Thomas, Sarah Borden, Elizabeth Garrison and others, some 
of whom were former St. Mary's girls, both Miss Lillian Fenner 
and Frances Geitner took the western trip. 

Miss Eenner sailed from ISTew York June 31st on the S. S. "Fin- 
land" of the Bed Star Line, having the select company of the Llarvard 
Alumni who were returning from Commencement. 

Sailing down the Atlantic Ocean and through the Caribbean Sea, 
which was extremely rough, they anchored in Limon Bay where 
they spent a day and night. 

The next morning they were raised 85 feet through Gatun Lock 
into Gatun Lake, where they were anchored four days on account of a 
landslide in the Culebra Cut in the Panama Canal. However, these 
days were not lost for all the Canal Zone was explored from Colon to 
Panama. 

At the end of the four days they continued their journey, being 
lowered 42 feet through Pedro Miguel Lock and 39 feet through 
Miraflores Lock into Panama Bay. Next morning they entered 
the Pacific Ocean, which they found much colder than the Atlantic. 
Three days passed before land was seen and then for a whole day 
the coast of Mexico lay in sight. After this, no more land appeared 
until they reached San Diego, where one day was spent at the Ex- 
position. Two days later they landed in San Francisco, where Miss 
Fenner stayed ten days, spending five whole days at the Exposition 
and giving up the rest of the time to seeing the other wonderful sights 
in San Francisco. 

Of the exhibits at the Exposition, Miss Fenner thought that the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Canadian Exhibit was the most wonderful from the American Conti- 
nent and that those of France and Italy were the most wonderful 
among the European Exhibits. 

Miss Fenner left San Francisco August 1st by the Western Pacific 
Route, seeing Feather River Canyon, Royal Gorge, the Salt Beds of 
Salt Lake City and coming home by Chicago, Cincinnati and Ashe- 
ville. After seeing the beautiful mountains of western North Caro- 
lina she finally reached Raleigh August 7, having spent over a month 
in the West. 

Frances Geitner went to the Exposition with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Shuford. They took the Central Route, leaving Nashville on 
July 28th and going by St. Louis, Colorado Springs, Salt Lake City 
and the Yellowstone Park. They reached San Francisco on August 
10th and spent six days at the Exposition. They returned by way of 
New Mexico, stopping in Arizona to visit the Grand Canyon and 
reaching home the last of August. 

Besides our Western travellers many others have brought back 
delightful accounts of happy vacations. 

Mademoiselle enjoyed a pleasant summer with friends in Maine, 
also paying a visit to the seacoast and to Boston with which she was 
especially pleased. Indeed she came away q-uite in love with the 
country and the people she had seen and declared that she had had a 
charming vacation. 

Miss Clara Fenner spent three delightful weeks at Hendersonville, 
two weeks with Miss Pixley and Miss Schutt, both former teachers 
at St. Mary's, and one week with Miss Kate Shipp, at Fassifern. 
Miss Fenner had a lovely time visiting the many points of interest and 
beauty in the neighborhood, but that she was by no means idle is 
well proved by the seven lovely sketches of beautiful mountain 
scenery that she brought back with her on her return. 

Miss Lee was also in Hendersonville at the same time as Miss 
Fenner. She spent ten weeks with her sister, Mrs. Clee Lee, and 
had a lovely time with walks and rides and parties. During her 
stay, she paid two visits to Beaumont Lodge in Asheville. Every- 
body will be glad to learn that Miss Lee returned quite recovered 
from her accident of last winter and feeling as well and strong as ever. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



She walked three or four miles every day and also climbed to the top 
of "Chimney Rock," a mile and a half of steady climbing, very steep 
and rough. 

One of the nicest expeditions of the summer was the month spent 
in camp by Miss Robbins and some of the girls in the Preparatory 
Department. Early in July they set out for "Camp Ware" in the 
mountains of western North Carolina, and had a glorious time living 
camp life and enjoying all the pleasures the mountains could afford. 
Everybody was sorry when the time came for them all to be scattered 
to their different homes. 



Froro the Attic 



H. M. Morgan, '18. 

Cobwebbed walls and dusty floors, 
Dark retreats and tumble-down doors; 
The old attic lies and broods and sleeps, 
Just 'neath the roof where the sunbeam peeps. 

Outside the peace of a June day reigns; 

It seems as if the soft wind deigns 

To gossip and prattle 'mongst birds and bees, 

And to tell the things that it does and sees. 

The maple and elder wave side by side; 
The tall cedars sway in feathery pride; 
The sea above dotted with isles of white, 
The sunbeams dancing with all their might. 



Waiter — "On which side of the table do you wish to sit, ma'am? 
Innocent Young Thing — "Oh, dear I think I had rather use a chair.' 
-Exchange. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



J. D. (seeing the laundry bags being taken from East Wing) — "Is that man 
taking those pillows to the Muse room?" 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Go. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES &, SLIPPERS 



'It's worth the difference" 



The Tyree Studio 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Tsn per cent off to College Girls 



l%e Jf astfjion 



Fayetteville 
Street 



KAPLAN BROS. CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 



eMME& 




xclusive 



mery 



RALEIGH ^.C 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 
Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



New Girl — "I can trace my ancestors back to William the Conqueror." 
Old Girl — "That's nothing; Mr. Lay can trace his to the Lays of Ancient 
Rome. 

New Girl — "Why, I bet I can too, then, because I'm kin to him." 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



gaint Mary's School Library 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

johnson & johnson co. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Payetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Perns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Oyer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 



w sl 






J f=l >R J— jE / g- /-/ . /v 



=9 



New Girl (joining in the conversation) — Did you say Charlie Chaplin? Is 
he an A. & M. boy?" 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


Hafapette Cafe 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Saving's Bank 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 


Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning' Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 

T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 



RICH JEWELRY 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 

HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Heard at the Exercise Chart — "Three 'W'? What does that mean? 
Wednesday?" 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards& Broughton Printing 

Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engrayers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
, 'Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., TurnakesA Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishm ent 

Cardwell & O'Kklly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



M. D. (tragically) — "Guess what! I'm sent to distention. No; I mean I'm 
districted." 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 

H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 
Norfolk, Va. 



Double Daily Express Service 

J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 

Raleigh's Leading Hotel 



Its Cafe one of the Best in the Country 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelr/ Cq. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 


WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direce Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, O. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE FALL PROGRAM 



Sept. 


16 ( 


Sept. 


18 ( 


Sept. 


25 ( 


Oct. 


2 ( 


Oct. 


9 ( 


Oct. 


11 ( 


Oct. 


16 ( 


Oct. 


20 ( 


Oct. 


25 ( 


Oct. 


30 ( 


Nov. 


1 (■ 


Nov. 


6 ( 


Nov. 


20 ( 


Nov. 


25 ( 


Dec. 


4 ( 


Dec 


11 ( 


Dec. 


16 ( 



(Thursday) The Opening. 
(Saturday) Opening Reception. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Signia Lambda Reception. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Alpha Rho Reception. 
(Monday) 8 :30 Faculty Recital. 

(Saturday) 8:30 Ingraham (Peace-St. Mary's Concert) 
(Wednesday) 1 :30 State Fair Day. 
(Monday) 3 :00 Field Day. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Hallowe'en Entertainment. 
(Monday) Founders' Day. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Annual Carnival. 
(Saturday) 8:15 Inter-Class Parties. 
(Thursday) Thanksgiving Day. 
(Saturday) 8 :30 "The Mikado." 
(Saturday) 8:30 Dramatic Club. 
(Thursday) 8:15 Christmas Entertainment. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these J S. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. ' . 

U THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 




Clit 

t JWao>'jS iMugc 



ilobemfrer, X915 



Autumn i?umber 




Paletot), Ji €♦ 



THE FALL PROGRAM 



Nov. 1 (Monday) Founders' Day. 

Nov. 6 (Saturday) 8:15 Annual Carnival. 

Nov. 20 (Saturday) 8 :15 Inter-Class Parties. 

Nov. 25 (Thursday) Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 4 (Saturday) 8 :30 "The Mikado." 

Dec. 11 (Saturday) 8:30 Dramatic Club. 

Dec. 16 (Thursday) 8 :15 Christmas Entertainment. 



The next number of the Muse — the Student Life Number — will be 
published November 10th. 

The Founders' Day (Alumnae) Number will be published Novem- 
ber 20th, and the December (Christmas) Number December 1st. 



EDWARDS ft BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH. N. C 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

AUTUMN NUMBER 

Vol. XX. November, 1915. No. 2 

Autumn 



A vague, haunting sadness broods over the earth; 

The forest's green banners are furled 
And the blue haze of Autumn like incense of prayer 

Hangs over the golden world. 

A spirit of quiet and rest is abroad, 

And wild-throbbing nature lies still, 
For peace rests over the russet field 

And over the purple hill. 

Dim memories are stirred by these golden days, 

Vague longings, and wistful regret, 
For the eve of the year, with its gentle appeal, 

Stirs man's soul, that he may not forget. 

A. S. C, '16. 



Papette 



Annie S. Cameron, '16. 

Papette had been in America a year. Yes, it would be a year to- 
morrow, since that terrible day. To Papette, swinging on the front 
gate in a quiet Southern village, it seemed more like a dreadful night- 
mare, than a grim reality. 

But what a black nightmare for a little girl to remember ! 

She could close her eyes and see it all again. The hot, dusty road, 
the smoke from the burning village, the shrieks and cries and hoarse 
shouts in the distance, and she, poor, terror-stricken little Papette 
stumbling along the road, strangled with sobs, choked with dust, and 
blinded with tears. 

It was just at that moment that the big red touring car had rounded 



52 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the curve in the road and, before she knew it, Papette was in the arms 
of a big man, sobbing out her terror, clinging to him and begging to be 
saved from the cruel soldiers. 

There was only a moment of questioning and Papette was lifted 
into the car, which turned and sped back on the road it had come. 

To the terrified child it seemed years that they rode thus, she cling- 
ing to the big man's knee, shaking with dread and almost deafened by 
the wild throbbing of her own heart. 

The days that followed were blurred in her memory. There were 
long hours in the red car, stoppings at villages and towns, narrow 
escapes from the soldiers, and then, one day, they had gotten on a big 
ship and come across the wide ocean to America, to the big man's 
home. 

Papette liked America, but never for an instant did she forget her 
own country. Every penny that came her way was hoarded for her 
little friends in Belgium, and every morning and night she prayed 
the dear God to take care of them. 

As she swung on the gate in the afternoon sunlight, she counted for 
the hundredth time the little sum she had saved. One dollar she had 
earned running errands and then ten pennies a week for weeding the 
flower-beds, and she had weeded seven weeks. The arithmetic was 
too much for Papette's small head. She scrambled off the gate, to 
figure it on the ground with a stick. If she could only make it come 
out five! Five dollars would keep a little Belgian child fed and 
clothed and cared for for a month. How she longed to send that sum ! 

Perhaps it was a slight noise that attracted her attention. She 
looked up, gave a little cry, and ran through the gateway. Down the 
street came a very dilapidated little creature. His long silky hair 
was tangled and matted, his plumy tail hung with a disconsolate 
droop, he limped on three legs, and deep in his eyes was an appealing 
pathos. 

How was Papette to know that back of all this dust and dejection 
lay a long pedigree ? that the morning paper had flared a big "Lost" 
in its columns ? To her he was merely a little dog in trouble and she 
gathered him with quick sympathy into motherly little arms. 

"Oh, le beau petit chien," she crooned, hugging him tight. "I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



shall take you quick to my Uncle Jean and ask him may I not keep 
you for always." 

So, clinging to her treasure, Papette hurried toward John Brant's 
law office. At the bottom of the hill, a pony cart whizzed past her, 
then stopped with a jerk. A pretty girl jumped out and ran to her 
with eager questioning. 

It was hard to understand her hurried English, but, after much 
explaining and repeating, Papette learned that the little dog belonged 
to her, that she had lost him the day before, that she had put a piece 
about him in the paper, that she was overjoyed at seeing him again. 

"Wait!" cried the girl, and, taking the little dog in her arms, she 
ran to the pony cart. She was back in a minute, and thrust a shiny 
coin into Papette's hand. 

"It's yours," she said, smiling at the little girl's look of doubt. 
"It's the reward for bringing the puppy back." Then stooping sud- 
denly she kissed the amazed little face and, climbing back into the 
pony cart, whizzed away. 

Papette stood quite still, gazing after her with wide-eyed wonder. 
Then she looked at the shiny coin. Her heart beat fast, she caught 
her breath. She looked again, fearfully, lest she should have been 
mistaken. A wave of color swept over her face and she broke into a 
run. Papette was a polite child, and always stopped to knock at 
John Brant's office door, but today there was time for no formalities. 
She burst into the room like a small cyclone. 

"Mon Oncle," she cried shrilly, lapsing into French, as she always 
did in moments of excitement, "Begardez, regardez, — the prize, the 
reward, — Voila ! — two whole months — l'argent — for them, mes pau- 
vres petits amis !" 



The Story of a St. Mary's Girl 



Belgian Field Hospital, Antwerp, September 28, 1914. 
"I'm here; I can't write much, but I am as happy as I can be in this awful 
time, working as hard as I can. The suffering is terrible. I cry my eyes out, 
but it is easier to be in the midst of it, however awful, if you can only help. 
Last night I nearly jumped out of my skin, the cannon sounded so near." 

So wrote Madelon Battle, during the first days of the Antwerp 



54 The St. Mary's Muse. 



siege, to anxious friends in America. She was one of a small group 
who had volunteered their services and even their funds, to maintain 
a hos]>ital for the Belgians who had been deprived of all means of 
caring for their own wounded. 

The events of the days following her writing of the letter are ad- 
mirably summed up in Colliers by Marie Van Vorst: 

"I wish you could have brushed aside the veil of distance and have 
looked in on my little study, untouched and unchanged, for I have 
never put anything away in it. It is just as it was, except that the 
big war map covers the wall and the flags flutter outside the window. 
There was a bright fire on the hearth — you know its changing colors, 
its lilac and ruby flames. And there on the sofa was Madelon Han- 
cock, in her dark blue and white dress, with the Red Cross on her 
breast ; and sweet little nurse Wells, in the lilac and white of the 
London Hospital, with the fluttering folds of the veil cap on her head ; 
and I wore the white of the American Ambulance. The two of them 
had just come from Antwerp, where they had been from the begin- 
ning in the British field hospital. There were tales that made mine 
absolutely pale. When the Germans came within range, they de- 
stroyed the aqueducts, and these nurses, with their hundred and 
seventy patients, were almost without water. Just think what that 
means in a hospital ! The little they used had to be carried from 
distant wells. Madelon and the chief doctor together dug a cesspool 
for the refuse in the garden, and as they dug the shells flew about 
them, the bullets snipping the leaves from the trees ; and they were 
such veterans by then and so hardened that they laughed even over 
their putrid work. These two women, with the other nurses, evacu- 
ated the hospital, packing those miserable, mutilated bodies like sar- 
dines in the omnibus which a few weeks before had been rolling 
around in London with the traveling public. And Madelon and Miss 
Wells were fifteen hours traveling through the day and night with 
their poor suffering load — -the bandages soaked and soaked again, the 
dangling limbs, just amputated, some of them and scarcely dressed. 
Think of it, all the courage and fortitude demanded of these women, 
and the nerve ! They were obliged to make detours to escape the live 
electric wires placed by the Germans across the road. Their last 
ambulance had scarcely left the pontoon bridge across the Scheldt 



The St. Mary's Muse, 55 



when it was blown up behind them. Through the sound and the cries 
of war, with the wounded in the busses groaning and crying out, 
themselves nearly wet to the bone and icy cold, they drove to Ghent, 
there to safely place their charges, only to be told to evacuate again. 
On to Ostend — on to boats for England. Out of the hundred and 
seventy only three died on the way, and these girls, with a few others, 
brought their hurt children safely into port." 

The next station for these brave volunteers was at Furnes, but they 
were shelled out of there and one nurse lost her life. 

Meanwhile Mrs. Hancock had been granted a short leave of ab- 
sence to join her husband at Cairo, where his troops were on the point 
of leaving for the Dardanelles. She was seriously ill and by special 
favor the journey from Dunkirk to Paris was made in the Naval 
Division air-ship, a rapid and daring flight with Germans in pursuit. 
Soon she was back again where the great guns were booming all 
around and the shells shrieking overhead, heartbroken to see Furnes 
deserted and Ypres in flames, The Belgian Field Hospital no longer 
had a permanent home. jNow it moves forward when the allies ad- 
vance. A letter during the summer says : "The wards are sheds out 
in the lovely green fields on the Ypres road. All the ambulances are 
lined up under the big trees. I sleep in the open by a brook. The 
sky is wonderful — a weird green light with flashes and bursts of 
flames as the shells explode. The position of the hospital is unique. 
Wherever the Belgian army moves, they are always to be within 
sound of the guns or near enough to render immediate aid and far 
enough away so that the wounded will not be shelled in their beds." 
Then the duties of a Bed Cross nurse are different from those in the 
base hospitals. Madelon has been out in the trenches again and 
again to bring in the wounded, often under fire. The demand upon 
power and endurance is great, because the wounded come in rushes. 
Severe wounds must be treated within twelve hours and surgeon and 
nurse must work day and night. Here it is, too, that the wounded 
are sorted out and sent to the different base hospitals as quickly as 
possible, in order to make room for the newcomers from the field of 
battle. 

We are told that Madelon is the only American girl in active 
service at the front, and her skill, her bravery, and her whole-hearted 



56 The St. Mary's Muse. 



devotion have won for her the nickname of "Glory." We of St. 
Mary's are prond to claim her as our very own, a girl of Old St. 
Mary's and of the Old South. Janet Glen. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



September 22— Tbe Faculty Reception 
The first Faculty Reception of the year was held in the parlor on 
Wednesday afternoon, September 22d. It was attended by a goodly 
eomjDany, including many alumna?, ever welcome guests at the School. 
Tea was served by members of the Senior Class and the afternoon 
passed very pleasantly. 

September 23— Student Assembly 
Instead of the regular talk on the first Thursday night, the assem- 
bly, after a few words from Miss Thomas, was given over to the 
student body. It was presided over by Mary Floyd, the president of 
the Senior Class, and several of the Seniors made short talks on dif- 
ferent subjects connected with school life. 

September 25— Sigma Lambda Reception 
On Saturday evening, September 25th, the Sigma Lambda's gave 
their annual reception in honor of their new members. At the door of 
the beautifully decorated Muse Room all were cordially welcomed by 
Miss Thomas and Miss Relyea, president of the society. Delicious 
punch was served by Misses Virginia Allen and Laura Beatty, while 
Misses Badham, Drane, Brigham and Brinley served a tempting 
salad course. After the popping of the favors the guests left, assur- 
ing all that they had spent a most delightful evening. . 

September 30— Miss Glen's Talk 

The first regular Thursday Xight Talk was made by Miss Glen. 
Her subject was one of the deepest interest to all of us, for it was the 
story of an old St. Mary's girl, and one of whorn we may well be 
proud — Mrs. Mortimer Hancock, who is now in the Bed Cross service 
at Hoogestadt, Belgium, and who used to be Madelon Battle of St. 
Mary's. 

As far as we know, she is the only American woman who holds an 
official position at the front. Mrs. Hancock has been in the Bed Cross 



The St. Mary's Muse. 57 



work ever since the beginning of the European war, and has been 
exposed to all sorts of dangers, having been in the shelling of Furnes 
and Antwerp. We have read interesting articles about Morning 
Glory, as she has been called, and of the great work she is doing for 
the wounded and destitute at the front, and we are very proud to 
remember that she is a St. Mary's girl. 

October 2— Dr. and Mrs. Lay's Reception to the Faculty 
On Saturday afternoon, October 2d, Dr. and Mrs. Lay held a de- 
lightful reception for the Faculty on their lawn from five to six 
o'clock. Punch, salad and candies were served by Ellen and Lucy 
and everyone found it to be a most pleasant occasion. 

October 2— A "Bloomer Party" 

One of the most successful events of the year was the Bloomer 
Party given by the members of the Sigma and Mu Athletic Associa- 
tions to their new members. The party was held in the Gymnasium, 
which was decorated with flags and banners of the two associations. 
At one end of the room the punch table, covered with green vines, was 
presided over by Josephine Myers. The girls were attired in Gym' 
costume, the Sigmas wearing red ties and the Mus black ones. 

The fun was started by a very exciting "Tug of War" between the 
clubs. After much laughing, pulling and tugging, the red ties were 
victorious. And then what a rush for the punch bowl ! The girls 
crowded around the bowl to quench their thirst and returned to the 
games with renewed vigor. 

The next event was a game of "Dodge Ball," which was won by 
the Mus. Various other games were played during the afternoon, 
such as "Pass Ball," "Goose and Gander," etc. 

The most exciting event of the afternoon, however, was the Relay 
Race. The Sigmas lined up on one side and the Mus on the other. 
The excitement was intense after the referee had given the signal to 
start. The Mus were victorious after a close race. 

The success of the party was due to the untiring efforts of Anne 
Brinley and Annie Robinson, the presidents of the two associations. 

V. C. A., '17. 

October 2— Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception 

On Saturday night, October 2d, the annual reception of the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi Literary Society was held in the Muse Room. The color 



58 The St. Mary's Muse. 



scheme of the Muse Room being green, it was easy to carry out the 
colors of the society, which are olive and gold, and the decorations 
were very attractive. After passing down the receiving line, which 
was composed of Helen Wright, president of the Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Society ; Frances Geitner, president of the Alpha Rho ; Eleanor Rel- 
yea, president of the Sigma Lambda; Fannie Stallings., first vice- 
president, and Alice Latham, second vice-president of the E.A.P., 
we were served with punch by Josephine Wilson. The delicious 
salad course was served by Annabelle Converse, Elmyra Jenkins, 
Janet Fairley, Ellen Lay, Selena Galbraith, and Violet Bray. 

The last of the guests left at the ringing of the 9 :30 bell, all the 
new girls being delighted with the idea of becoming members of the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. 1ST. P., '17. 

October 5— Inter-Society Meeting 

The first Inter-Society Meeting of the year was held in the Parlor, 
Tuesday night, October 5th, with Helen Wright, president of the 
E.A.P. Society, presiding. All the old and new girls were there to 
hear papers on the question of the effect of the war on the Balkans 
read by Ruby Thorn, Josephine Wilson, and Mary Floyd. After this 
program the meeting adjourned. F. R. G., '16. 

October 6— Mrs. CruiKshanK Entertains the Faculty 
On Wednesday afternoon, October the 6th, Mrs. Cruikshank en- 
tertained the Faculty at a most delightful tea. It was a cold, rainy 
afternoon, just the time when a bright room and good company are 
most enjoyed. 

The guests were sure that the Welsh rarebit was the best they had 
ever eaten and the other refreshments were delicious. The tea table 
was presided over by Miss Lee and the refreshments were served by 
two of the Seniors. Every one was sorry to go and declared that it 
had been a most pleasant occasion. But this would not have been 
considered the end of the festivities by any one who had witnessed 
the joy with which "Senior Hall" entered after the departure of the 
guests and " finished up" the party. 

October T— Miss Thomas' TalK 
On Thursday night, October 7th, Miss Thomas made a short talk 
about the encouraging facts in going to school. She reminded us 



The St. Maby's Muse. 59 



that whether we knew it or not, this period of faithful study and daily 
routine was storing up for us that which would be of the greatest joy 
and value in after life, and that by thus broadening our interests we 
would increase a thousand fold our interest and pleasure in every 
thing with which we came in contact and thus climb higher and higher 
up the Mountain of Knowledge, from which we might look out over 
the world and see all sorts of beautiful things. 

October 8— Knox-Emerson Concert 
On Friday night, October 8th, many of the girls enjoyed attending 
the concert given by Miss Emilie Rose Knox and little Lillian Emer- 
son. Miss Knox is an old St. Mary's girl, and we are watching her 
musical career with great pride and interest. Lillian Emerson's 
mother also attended St. Mary's. 

October 9— Alpha Rho Reception 

The Muse Room was the scene of a very enjoyable event on Satur- 
day night, October 9th, when the annual Alpho Rho Reception was 
held in honor of the new girls. The guests, upon entering, were 
cordially welcomed by Frances Geitner, president of the society ; 
Estelle Ravenel, vice-president ; Robena Carter, secretary ; Nellie 
Rose, treasurer, and Helen Wright, president of the E.A.P. Society. 
Josephine Myers presided at the punch bowl, which was very attrac- 
tively decorated with autumn leaves. A delicious salad course was 
served by Anna May Freeman, Clara Mardre and Virginia Williams. 
When the time came to leave on every side could be heard "What a 
lovely reception!" or "How attractive the Muse Room looks with its 
decorations of goldenrod and autumn leaves!" and everybody had a 
"perfectly wonderful" time. K. D., '18. 

October II— Faculty Recital 

On Monday night, October 11th at 8 :30 o'clock was given the 
first Faculty Recital of the season in the Auditorium. 
The News and Observer said of the Recital : 

The Faculty Concert at St. Mary's Monday evening was greatly enjoyed 
by an enthusiastic audience. A Mozart player is rare even among musicians 
but in the opening number (a sonata for violin and piano) Miss Muriel 
Abbott and Mr. R. Blinn Owen proved themselves among the initiated, and 
their interpretation of the great master's art was a joy to those who heard 
and understood. 



60 The St. Maky's Muse, 



Miss Zona Shull, Soprano, sang a group of songs in which the purity 
and flexibility of her voice were admirably revealed. "Now Sleeps the 
Crimson Petal" and "Before the Dawn," were special favorites. 

Miss N. Agatha Phillips played a Chopin group with excellent effect. 
Her tone is rich and full and she combines good technique with delicacy 
and poetical feeling in her interpretations. 

Miss Abbott held her audience as always in a charming group for violin, 
and after the "Tambourin" there was a storm of applause which would not 
be satisfied until she played an encore — a selection with an inspiring rhythm 
and haunting melody. 

The program ended with a duet from "Pagliacci" delightfully sung by 
Miss Shull and Mr. Owen. 

The full program was as follows : 

Sonata in E flat Mozart 

(a) The Leaves and the Wind Leoni 

( b ) Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Quilter 

(c) Before the Dawn Meyer 

Etude, Op. 10, No. 12 « 

Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 1 C Chopin 

Waltz, E minor ) 

(a) Indian Lament DvoraJc-Kreisler 

(o) Chanson — Meditation R. Cottenet 

(c) Tambourin Chinois Ereisler 

Duet from "Pagliacci" — "Silvio! a quest 'ora" Leoncavallo 

Miss Shull and Mr. Owen 

(Miss Phillips at the Piano) 

October 14— Mrs. Jones' Thursday TalK 
On Thursday evening, October 14th, the short talk was by Mrs. 
W. J. Jones of Salemburg, 1ST. C, who had been for several days 
the guest of Mrs. Lay. Mrs. Lay is this year Chairman of the 
Social Service Department of the Woman's Club of Raleigh and 
Mrs. Jones, who is one of the leaders in the Model Community Work 
which is being done at Salemburg, came to Raleigh to speak before 
Mrs. Lay's Department. Her talk in the Schoolroom gave us the 
message "Do something to help somebody" and it was the more 
brought home to us by our knowledge of the splendid work she her- 
self is doing in her school for country girls. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 61 



October 16— prances Ingram, Contralto 
On Saturday night, the 16th, the Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series 
of 1915-16 was opened in the St. Mary's Auditorium. 
The News and Observer said: 

The Peace-St. Mary's Artist Course opened the season last evening by pre- 
senting to the musical public of Raleigh the eminent contralto, Frances 
Ingram, in a charming recital. Miss Ingram possesses a voice of remarkable 
richness, power and sweetness. 

She is above all a dramatic singer and a program as given by her last 
evening, makes the music lover long to hear her in opera, but still she is 
able to hold her audience in the more lyric numbers. Her numbers were 
varied and delightfully contrasted. For the aria she chose the fara senza 
Euridice, singing it with a wealth of tone and power. The Sapphic Ode 
also was splendidly done. In direct contrast to the above were dainty 
songs by Lemaire and Hugo Wolf. A very unusual offering was an encore 
demanded after the end of the program when she came out and sang 
with the simplicity of a little child the dear old hymn, "I think when I 
read that sweet story of old." She was ably assisted by Mr. Arthur Fram 
at the piano. His accompaniments were artistically done and his solo 
playing made the audience wish for more of it. 

The program was as follows: 

I. II mio del foco (Old Italian) Marcello 

del mio dolce ardor (Old Italian) Gluck 

Early one Morning Old English 

Oh, No, John Old English 

II. Aria from Orfeo (Che fara senza Euridice) Gluck 

III. Lockruf Ruckauf 

Sapphic Ode Brahms 

Matchens Erste Liebe Hugo Wolf 

Zueignung Strauss 

IV. Allegro moderato Movement from Fantaisie in A Minor Godard 

Me. Fram 

V. Beau Soir Debussy 

Vous dansez, Marquise Lemaire 

Morning Rachmaninoff 

Hopak Moussorgsky 

VI. Aria from Herodiate (II est Doux) Massenet 

VII. Sing to me, Sing! Sidney Homer 

By the Waters of Minnetonka Thurlow Lieurance 

The Cry of Rachel Mary Turner Salter 

1 Know my Love (West Ireland) Old Irish 

Peace Gertrude Ross 



62 The St. Maky's Muse. 



October 18-23— The State Fair 

Fair Week ! That name will always bring back happy memories. 
ISTo one minded going to school on Monday with Wednesday and 
Thursday to look forward to. 

Although excitement had reigned supreme for days before, the 
true celebration began with the trip down town on Tuesday night, 
Miss Thomas taking the Seniors and Miss Sutton the Juniors. 
Neither party would admit that the other could have had as good 
a time as they, and no one who did not go can imagine how wonder- 
ful it was. 

Wednesday morning was filled with excitement due to the arrival 
of the "folks from home" and the meeting of friends. The Floral 
Parade at noon was thoroughly enjoyed in spite of the driving rain. 
At two o'clock the majority of the School sallied forth to the Fair, 
returning late that afternoon loaded down with candy and yard- 
sticks, popcorn and balloons, dead-tired but supremely happy. 

It was indeed a blessing to have Thursday for a day of rest and 
everybody took advantage of it except the lucky ones who could go 
out with their families and those who had energy enough left to go 
to the South Carolina-A. & M. football game. 

Every one had a glorious time and wished that Fair Week could 
come oftener than once a year. 

October 20— Gilmer-Sorrentino Concert 

On Wednesday night, October 20th, many of the girls had the 
pleasure of attending the concert given in the city Auditorium by 
Miss Josephine Gilmer and Signor Umberto Sorrentino. 

The concert was greatly enjoyed by all and was made especially 
interesting to those of St. Mary's by the fact that Miss Gilmer was 
herself a "St, Mary's girl." 

October 25— The Annual TracK Meet 

On Monday, October 25th, under perfect weather conditions, the 
Second Annual Track Meet was held between the two athletic 
associations. The Sigmas, brilliant with red ties, were first to 
march upon the field; then, a few minutes later, appeared the blue- 
bedecked Mus. 

Spirit and enthusiasm was manifested by the. splendid yells ably 
led by the cheer-leaders, Eosalyn Kincaid for Sigma, and Alice 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



63 



Latham for Mu. In the events every girl, whether contestant or 
official, did her very best, which made the meet snch a great success. 

The final result was victory for the Sigmas by a score of 117 to 
81 points, reversing the Mu victory of last year, and so increasing 
the interest in the further contests between the rivals. 

The two associations will meet in Basket-ball on Monday, Novem- 
ber 1st, and the Tennis Tournament will begin on Monday, Novem- 
ber 8. 

The record of the Track Meet is as follows : 



I. 25 Yard Dash: Jensen, Sigma, first; 
Sigma, second. 
II. Hurl Ball: Won by Mu. 56. Sigma, 47. 
III. Running Broad Jump. 
Mu. 

Askew 12 ft. 11 in. 

Bourne . 12 4 

Brinley 11 5 

Knight 10 11 

Burke 10 9 

Beatty 10 8 



Holmes, Mu. and A. Cameron, 



Sigma. 

Hoke 12 

Waddell 11 

Taylor 11 

Jensen 11 

Ravenel 10 

Cameron 10 



ft. 



IV 
V 



Won by Sigma — greatest average 10 ft. 5 in. 
Mu. — 8 ft. 9 in. (Two girls overstepping lowered Mu average) 
Score: For greatest average: Sigma — 15 points 

For longest jump — Mu 5 points. 
Last year's record: Askew — 13 ft. 1 in. 
Obstacle Race: Won by Mu — 20 points. 
Basket-ball Distance Throw: 



Mu. 

Brinley 66 ft. 6 

Walker 56 4 

Burke 55 5 

Shepherd 53 11 

Beatty 53 

Stockton 51 8 

Collins 49 

E. B. Lay 47 4 

Bourne 45 10 

Bennett 43 5 



Sigma. 

Waddell 67 

Woolford 61 

Robinson 56 

Tucker 56 

Daniels 52 

Taylor 50 

Albertson 46 

Mullins 46 

Denham 44 

Ravenel 43 



ft. 



9 in. 
11 

4 

4 

9 
10 

6 

3 

9 



Average: 50 4 Average: 

Score: For greatest average — Sigma 15 points. 
For longest throw: Sigma — 5 points. 
(Last year's record, Brinley — 58 ft. 2 in.) 
VI. Relay Race: Won by Sigma, Score — 20 points 
Final Score: Sigma, 117; Mu, 81. 



50 



64 The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Personals 



Emma Badham, '17, and Nellie Rose, '17. 

On October 3d we had a very pleasant visit from Agnes Barton, 
who is now studying in the University of North Carolina. 

Julia Bryan had a visit from her father, October 3d. 

Constance Kent's mother spent several days with her last week. 

Margaret Best received a visit from her mother, Monday, Octo- 
ber 4th. 

Doris Swett's father was here October 4th. 

Fannie Biggs Martin had a very pleasant visit from her father, 
Monday, October 4th. 

The girls have enjoyed frequent visits from Arabelle Thomas, who 
has been staying in Raleigh with her sister, Mrs. Brent S. Drane. 

Annie Cameron and Rebecca Wall had a visit from Miss Sue Hayes 
and Miss Lawrence of Hillsboro, 1ST. C. 

We had a short visit on Sunday, October 10th, from Misses Lanie 
Hales and Gladys Smith. 

Miss Richards, a mission worker at St. Augustine's, took dinner 
with Mr. Lay, October 7th. 

Frances Geitner enjoyed a visit from her father on Sunday, Octo- 
ber 10th. 

Virginia Allen has had the pleasure of a visit from Mrs. Royster 
of Hickory. 

Rena Harding had a very pleasant visit from her brother-in-law, 
Prof. Henry, of Chapel Hill, on October 13th. 

Miss Mary Pride Jones of New York spent Thursday, October 
14th, at the School with her sister, Mrs. Cruikshank, on her way 
from Oxford to visit her brother, Mr. Cad Jones, in Ozark, Ala. 

Katherine Drane enjoyed a visit from her father, Rev. R. B. 
Drane of Edenton, in October. Dr. Drane was en route to Sewanee 
to attend the meeting of the Missionary Council there. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 65 



Elizabeth Corbitt, Margaret Best, Robena Carter, Mae Tredwell, 
Hattie Copeland and Margaret Marston have recently had visits 
from their mothers. 

Nellie Rose has had a very pleasant visit from her younger 
sister, Josephine, and Elizabeth Dorsey has enjoyed visits from 
her father and sister. 

Emma Badham and Julia Bryan had their fathers with them on 
Sunday, October 24th, and Alice Hughes of Henderson visited her 
sister, Aline Hughes, during the Fair. 

Mattie Moye Adams, '15, of Durham paid us a brief and pleasant 
visit recently, the guest of Katherine Stewart. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lay had a very pleasant and restful week at 
Virginia Beach the latter part of October and we are very glad to 
have them back again. 

On Saturday evening, October 24th, "Boom 23, Main Building" — 
the two Hattie Copelands, Margaret Marston and Miriam Holli- 
day, entertained some forty of their friends at a delightful party. 
A salad course, followed by ice cream, was greatly enjoyed, and 
everyone had a lovely time. 



A Hallowe'en Party to the Muse Club 



On Saturday night, October 24th, Mr. Cruikshank gave the 
Muse Club a delightful Hallowe'en party. The Muse Boom was 
bright in Hallowe'en decorations, black owls stared at us from 
the walls while witches, ghosts and cats appeared on the table. 
Favors and souvenirs were at each place. Between courses we were 
entertained by Hallowe'en games and puzzles. At the end of this 
most enjoyable evening Miss Thomas expressed for us our apprecia- 
tion and thanks to Mr. Cruikshank for the nicest party we have 
been to this year. 

The Art Department at the State fair 



This year as usual St, Mary's Art Department made a good 
showing at the State Fair. Miss Fenner regretted having no oil 



66 The St. Maey's Muse. 



work, but that the exhibit was a good one is manifested by the 
five blue ribbons that it won. Prizes were taken in almost every 
department. One was taken for advanced work in charcoal, one for 
tinted charcoal, one for original design, one for applied design and 
one for clay modeling. During the year the studio may be over- 
looked by visitors but during Fair week and at Commencement are 
surely shown the good results of Miss Fenner's teaching. 



Bits of Optimism 

An optimist and pessimst — 

The difference is droll. 
The optimist sees the doughnut, 

The pessimist sees the hole. 



Don't you hunt foh trouble; 

Jis' ten' to what you's got. 
It ain't no special credit 

Even if you fin's a lot. 



No use in sighin' — 

Tellin' of yo' woe! 
Ef you can't swim de river, 

You must let de river go! 



It hain't no use to grumble and complain; 

It's jest as cheap and easy to rejoice. 

When God sorts out the weather and sends rain, 

W'y rain's my choice. — Riley. 



Tarry Not 

The road to yesterday — 

Why travel it? 
A tangled skein, so why 

Unravel it? 
The future calls you on, 

The past is dead, 
And all you hope to do 

Lies just ahead. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price ********* One Dollar. 

Single Copies ******** Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mary A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberly Bourne, '16 \ t>, • OD m-„ _„_„__ 

Fannie Marie Stallings, '16 ) Buslness Managers 



EDITORIAL 



What the Alumnae Can Do to Help 



Although we are assured of the love and loyalty of the alumnse, we 
feel that we do not enjoy this mutual benefit to as great an extent as 
we might. 

We want to get in closer touch with them, to know where they are 
and what they are doing, and we want, them to take an interest in us 
and our work. We want them to know about the school, what we 
have done, what we are doing, and what we hope to do ; for after all, 
it is the influence of the alumnse on the outside that is the greatest 
help. 

We especially wish that those in town would attend the receptions, 
concerts, plays, and other affairs of general interest that happen here. 
They are very welcome guests and we are always glad to see them. 

We wish, too, that all the alumnse would take the Muse, not as a 
matter of financial assistance, but to form a closer bond between us, 
that they may know what we are doing and that we, through its pages, 
may more and more gain news of them. 



68 The St. Mary's Muse. 



pounders' Day 



"All Saints" has always been a special day at St. Mary's. The 
importance given to it by the founder, Dr. Aldert Smedes, was em- 
phasized by his son and successor, Dr. Bennett Smedes, who made it 
one of the two days in the Church year, Ascension Day being the 
second, when the day-pupils were especially asked to be present at the 
Eucharistic Feast, 

It has always been the desire of those in charge of the Chapel to 
have it especially beautiful on "All Saints." The writer has many 
cherished memories of the "little brown Chapel" as it looked when, 
beautified by autumn leaves and chrysanthemums, it seemed to speak 
to us of those who had gone before. 

Most fitting was it, therefore, that Dr. Bratton, third Hector of 
St. Mary's, should set apart this day so closely associated with the 
two Smedes rectors, as a day on which we should remember all who 
have helped to carry on at St. Mary's the work begun and strength- 
ened by them. 

Among those specially memorialized now, on this day, is the Rev. 
MclSTeely DuBose, fourth Rector of St. Mary's. The Chapel was his 
first interest. Through his influence St. Mary's girls were led to 
place there many memorials which now make it more than ever the 
place we all love. 

Among St, Mary's daughters, Mrs. Kate deRosset Meares, first 
Lady Principal and co-worker with Rev. Bennett Smedes, will be 
lovingly thought of by those who knew her. In spite of other press- 
ing duties, the Chapel music was one of her special interests, and she 
gave to the girls under her charge the benefit of her own enthusiasm 
and love of music. 

In St. Mary's Chapel, for sixty years hallowed by the presence and 
faithful labors of men and women who have gone to their reward, we 
may on "All Saints" have our part in singing — 

"For all thy saints who from their labors rest, 
Thy name, Jesus, be forever blest. Alleluia." 

K. McK. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 69 



The Rector's Trips 



From October 12th to the 14th Dr. Lay attended the Convocation 
of Raleigh, which was held at the Church of the Good Shepherd. 
This is one of the Convocations among which the work of the Diocese 
of JsTorth Carolina is divided, and to each of which a regular offering 
is made during the school year. The other two divisions are the 
Convocation of Charlotte and the Convocation of the Colored People. 
Dr. Lay will attend the Charlotte Convocation from October 26th to 
the 28th. 

On November 18th the Rector will speak, by invitation of Bishop 
Nelson, at the Convention of the Diocese of Atlanta, in Columbus, 
Ga., on "The Value of a Church School for Girls." 



THE MONTH AHEAD 



The Athletic Program 

This year athletics have started off with a vim and each club is 
preparing for victory. We are glad to see so many out on the courts 
practicing for basketball, and we hope and know that the enthusiasm 
will keep up. Even though you do not play, come out and give the 
players your support — for it is as much your part to cheer as it is 
theirs to play the game. 

This is the programme : 

October 25— Field Day 

1. Seventy-five Foot Dash: 

All Mus and Sigmas are to be run off to the two best of each. Then they 
run, the first winner gaining ten points for her team, the second 
eight and the third three. 

2. Hurl Ball: 

This is an interesting and exciting game which isn't a bit complicated. 
Anyone can enter. 

3. Obstacle Race : 

Something entirely new. 

4. Running Broad Jump: 

Last year's record, 13 feet, 1 inch — Espeth Askew. Try to beat it. 

5. Relay Race. 



70 The St. Mary's Muse. 



October 25-November 6— Tennis Tournament 

The finals are to be played November 6th, which games will natu- 
rally be the most exciting. All entries must be signed up by October 
23d. Even though you are not a good player, enter! Show your 
enthusiasm and so uphold your good players. Those who don't play, 
come out and cheer for the girls who represent your club. Letters 
are awarded the three winners. 

November I — BasKet Ball Game 

As near as possible, these teams will be composed of, so far, the 
best players of each club. But this does not mean that these players 
are going to be the girls of the first team who will receive letters at 
the end of the year. 

November 15— BasKet Ball Game 
This game is between the second teams. The winning of this game 
means as much to each club as the winning of a first-team game. Do 
not miss seeing it, as we guarantee it will be exciting. 

A. C. L., '17. 



The Hallowe'en Party 



On Saturday night, October 30th, will be held the annual Hallow- 
e'en Party in the Gymnasium. This is always one of the nicest 
events of the year and no one who has seen it can ever forget the fan- 
tastic "grand march" of the whole School in costume: witches, ghosts, 
gypsies, sailor lads, milk maids, fairies and scarecrows jostle each 
other at the fortune teller's booth or mingle in the dance. We hope 
the Hallowe'en party will be even a greater success than ever this 
year, so if you have not already done so, plan your costume and choose 
your partner, and above all do not fail to be one of that jolly crowd 
of freaks and fairies. 



pounders' Day 



November 1st, All Saints' Day, has a special significance for St. 
Mary's, for it is Founders' Day, a time set aside for the memory 
of those who have made St. Mary's what it is. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 71 



Other Coming Events 



Some time before Christmas, Mr. Owen's Chorus Class will pre- 
sent the popular Japanese opera, "Mikado," by Gilbert and Sullivan. 
All who witnessed the successful operetta "Trial by Jury" of last year 
are looking forward to this event with greatest pleasure and en- 
thusiasm. 

On Saturday night, November 6th, a grand Carnival will be held 
by the Muse Club. Any one who has ever attended one of them can 
bear witness to the pure fun the Carnival affords. There will be all 
sorts of new attractions; among some familiar ones we hope to see 
and hear Jo Wilson's "famous ragtime band." And do not forget 
all the good things to eat and save your money for the grand event. 



Lithpth 

Thuthie and Thaddie and Thethelia were thitterth! Thuthie wath thad 
and thober, Thaddie wath theerful and thmiling. Her thitherth thought 
the wath thilly. 

And one day Thethelia wath walking home from thurth with Thamuel 
Thimpthon, and Thuthie and Thaddie were thitting on the fenth thwinging 
their thlipperth. 

Then thuthie and Thaddie thaid, "Oh, Thethelia, why do you thmile tho 
thilly?" 

But Thethelia kept on walking with Thamuel Thimpthon, and Truthie 
and Thaddie are thill thitting on the fenth. 



The Way to Tal^e It 

Dis de way to take it 

In a worl' er loss: 
Ef you can't swim the river, 

Let de yuther feller cross! 
Maybe w'en he swim it — 

Stemmin' er de tide — 
He'll light on a ferryboat 

On de yuther side! 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
Honorary Vice-Presxdents - { Jg ^SS^l&f^gSbaAun. 

President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The Founders' Day Meeting, 1915 

This Muse, delayed in press, will appear just about Founders' 
Day — All Saints' — November 1st. It will hardly reach the Alumnae 
in time to bring a further word from the School to wish success to 
these Founders' Day Meetings. But word has already gone out by 
letter from the School to the several Chapters and groups that should 
become Chapters, and our hope is high that the next Muse will 
chronicle a most inspiring observance of Founders' Day. 

The Alumnae are a very vital factor in the continuing prosperity 
and growth of the School. The Alumnae cannot reach or keep their 
greatest effectiveness as Alumnae, whether collectively or as indi- 
viduals, without more or less regular meetings. Two days each year 
have been set aside for these meetings : Founders' Day, November 1st, 
and Alumnae Day, May 12th. At about these dates wherever there is 
sufficient Alumnae interest there should be meetings. 

Merely the gathering together of the old St. Mary's girls to talk of 
St. Mary's is in itself worth while, but it is possible to make the 
meetings even more than merely interesting. 

Founders' Day this year finds us in the midst of the first thoroughly 
serious attempt in some years to accomplish certain definite objects 
in which the Alumnae are primarily interested and which must 
depend on the Alumnae if they are to meet with success. The success 
of two of these objects will be determined by the Alumnae interest 
and response at this time: (1) The Alumnae Register; (2) The 
Alumnae Scholarship Endowment. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 73 



Following several years of talk there was launched the past month 
the first complete campaign to accomplish these two objects. Because 
comparatively so few of the Alumnae are members of Chapters the 
call was made to the individual Alumnae and not to the Chapters. 
The primary purpose of the campaign was to bring the call to every 
living Alumna of St. Mary's. Only by the concerted help of all the 
Alumnae in touch with the School can even this first purpose be even 
approximately attained. It is estimated that there are at present 
between 2,500 and 3,000 Alumnae of St. Mary's living. Seemingly 
correct addresses were available for 1,500 letters, reaching about 
1,700 Alumnae. The other 1,000 Alumnae have, most of them, prob- 
ably, not yet had the campaign brought to their attention. The two 
weeks before Founders' Day were allotted as the time for the Alumnae 
to be thinking over the matter. The Founders' Day Meetings should 
bring the matters squarely before the collected Alumnae. Following 
Founders' Day we will devote the two months before the holidays to 
following out the suggestions of the Founders' Day Meetings and 
giving the Alumnae the fullest opportunity, individually, to help 
with the movement. Early in January we shall publish the Alumnae 
Register, made as correct as the Alumnae have enabled us to make it ; 
we shall report to the Alumnae the result of the effort for the Scholar- 
ship Fund and leave further action for the Alumnae. 



Outline of trje Purpose of a Brief Alumnae Campaign, 
October 15-30, 1915 



The purposes of the campaign are three. A brief summary of 
each of them is given here. 

I. The Preparation of an Up-to-Date Alumnae Register. 

It is a matter of much interest to the Alumnae, and of decided im- 
portance to the School, that there should be a published list of the 
Alumna? with their present names and addresses and such other in- 
formation as can be given in such a record. Without this both the 
Alumnae Association and the School are often handicapped. Spas- 
modic work on this register has been done from time to time the past 



74 The St. Maey's Muse. 



ten years, and it is near enough completion to be completed in this 
campaign with the cooperation of all interested. It is planned in 
this register to give so far as possible an alphabetical list of the 
Alumna? of St. Mary's (both living and dead, by their maiden names), 
with their schoolday addresses and the years they were at school; to 
give the married names of the married Alumnae, the date of marriage, 
and the present address ; in the case of those who are dead, to give the 
date of death and the address at the time of death. 

The present address of about one-quarter of the Alumna? is not 
known at the School. It is our belief that this number can be re- 
duced to less than five per cent by the end of the campaign. 

The list of the Alumna? of the School is presumably complete from 
1879 to the present. Before that date there are no records surviving. 
The list of Alumna? prior to 1879 will, therefore, necessarily be in- 
complete. The list as published will contain the names of all those 
at present known at the School and of all those of whom information 
may be had during the campaign. 

Your cooperation is asked, (1) in supplying any necessary infor- 
mation about yourself, (2) in supplying similar information about 
any of your friends, and (3) in giving names and such facts as you 
can about the Alumna? of the School before 1879. 

Blanks for this information are enclosed. 

II. Completion of the Scholarship Fund. 

The Alumna? Association completed its second work — the rebuild- 
ing of the Chapel — in 1904. In 1907 it was decided to make its next 
work the establishment of two scholarships of $3,000 each in honor 
of Mrs. Mary Iredell and Miss Kate McKimmon, both so well known 
to every St. Mary's girl. At that time it was planned to have this 
scholarship fund raised by the end of five years. Many things inter- 
fered and the important point at present is that up to now only $3,500 
of the $6,000 has been raised. Such a depressing effect has this had 
on the Alumna? activity that some of the leading Alumna? have even 
advocated the closing of the Scholarship Fund uncompleted rather 
than to have it drag on longer. The New York and Chapel Hill 
Chapters before the annual meeting of the Association last May de- 
cided to urge upon the Association and the several Chapters and the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 75 



individual Alumnae, the advisability of closing the Scholarship Fund 
by the coming Founder's Day, and a resolution endorsing this propo- 
sition was passed by the Association at the annual meeting in May. 
The letter of the Chapel Hill Chapter to the Alumnae in general is 
sent you herewith. It is not a propitious time for raising funds, but 
few of us are so placed that we can not do a little in this matter if we 
are fully interested. The Chapel Hill Chapter set five dollars as the 
gift it hoped that as many as possible of the Alumna3 would make to 
this end. Every gift, however small, will help, but in order to ac- 
complish the purpose it will be necessary for all to contribute some- 
thing. 

As you probably know, by resolution of the Association several 
years ago it was decided to pay the interest on the invested funds 
already raised to Mrs. Iredell and Miss McKimmon during their life- 
time, and then to give the funds to the School, the interest to be 
applied to the scholarships. 

You are asked to do what you can in this matter, to do it promptly, 
and to bring it to the attention of as many as possible of the other 
Alumnae. 

Blanks are enclosed. Checks should be made out to Mrs. Ernest 
Cruikshank, Treasurer of the Alumnae Association. 

III. Enlarge the Usefulness of The Muse. 

As most Alumnae know, The Muse is the student publication of 
the School, issued monthly during the School year. It was re- 
established in 1904 and was made the official organ of the Alumnae 
in 1909. 

The Rector has often been asked how the Alumnae could best help 
him in his work for the School. He always replies that the first step 
is for the Alumnae to be thoroughly posted on the facts concerning the 
School and what is happening at the School. He feels that this in- 
formation can best be had through The Muse, and if The Muse was 
more widely subscribed for by the Alumnae a long step would be taken 
in getting the Alumnae into closer touch with present-day St. Mary's 
affairs. If The Muse had even five hundred paid subscriptions it 
could be mailed at second-class rates at a considerable saving. The 
subscription to The Muse is only one dollar a year and, while sub- 



76 The St. Mart's Muse. 



scribers pay only for The Muse, all the official Bulletins of the 
School, including the School catalogue, are sent to Muse subscribers 
without special request on their part. While this campaign is to last 
but three weeks, every effort will be made at the School to hold any 
ground gained in the campaign and to continue to increase Alumnae 
interest, and the way the Alumna? and the School can best hold the 
ground gained is by making The Muse better and having all the 
Alumnas read it. 

You are asked, therefore, if you will, to send your dollar for The 
Muse. 

Blanks for this purpose are enclosed. 

The Founders' Day Meeting. 

The past has shown that it is possible to have very successful 
Founders' Day meetings with sufficient preparation, but the average 
Chapter feels more or less at a loss about the program. Once in the 
past it was found possible at the School to provide a program and 
the meetings were very successful. If this campaign has the enthusi- 
astic cooperation of the Alumnse, there should be a far greater interest 
than usual in the Founders' Day meetings, as we shall at that time be 
able to give a definite idea of what has been accomplished in each of 
the three matters mentioned above. But we wish to go further than 
that, and so in order to relieve the Chapters of the necessity of getting 
the material for the program, we will forward this material and hope 
that it will prove interesting. The earlier and the more generally we 
can hear from the Alumna3 in response to this letter the more interest- 
ing we can make the program. As it will not be fully prepared before 
October 20th, any suggestions will be much appreciated. 

A blank for suggestions is enclosed. 



With the Class of 1914 



Laura Placidia Clark, '14. 

Myrtle Warren is teaching again in the High School at Weldon. 
Sallie Heyward is teaching in the Johnston, South Carolina, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 77 



schools, where she will probably see a good deal of Emma Bouknight, 
who is keeping house and having a good time at home. 

Josephine Smith is teaching at Battleboro, which, of course, is very 
near her home. 

Susie Mclver, after spending a few weeks in the University of 
Virginia this summer, has decided to teach at Asheboro, while So- 
phronia Cooper is this year teaching at Siler City. 

Mary Smith is Parish Visitor in Roanoke Rapids, where her 
brother is minister, and Kate Hale Silver, whose uncle has been very 
ill, was in Arden the last news heard from her. 

Nellie Wood, the last we heard of her, was working in her father's 
office for ten days. 

Julia Allen, with her sister, has returned to Randolph-Macon, and 
we think that Julia Cooper has carried out her plan of going off to 
college, though we don't know where she is. 

Mary Tyson has just returned from Charlotte, where her mother 
is in a sanitarium taking a course of treatment. Mary is staying 
at home. 

Laura Clark is at home, working in a lawyer's office in the evenings. 

We have heard nothing from Hoppe, Grace Crews, or Melba Mc- 
Cullers. 



Births 

Born, September 27, 1915, to Chas. F. and Nellie B. Kintner Kellogg, of 
Athens, Pa., a son; Chaiies Frederick Kellogg, Jr. 

Born, October 15, 1915, to Mr. and Mrs. R. Blinn Owen, at their home in 
West Raleigh, a daughter; Lucy Evelyn Owen. 



Marriages 

Stafford-Graves. — On Friday, April 30th, at Eagle Pass, Texas, Mr. William 
Mulder Stafford and Miss Edna Graves. 

Winder-McArthur. — On Wednesday, June 2d, at Winston-Salem, Mr. John 
Cox Winder and Miss Helen McArthur. 

Bland-Patrick. — On Wednesday, June 2d, at Petersburg, Va., Mr. Charles 
Watkins Bland and Miss Janie Louise Patrick. 



78 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Nowell-Edwards. — On Wednesday, June 16th, at Raleigh, N. C, Dr. John 
William Nowell and Miss Margaret Edwards. 

Wheat-Turpin. — On Thursday, June 24th, at Centreville, Md., Mr. Rober- 
deau Wheat and Miss Isabel Emory Turpin. 

Thuelow-Rowand. — On Wednesday, June 30th, at Providence, R. I., Mr. 
Harry Hadley Thurlow and Miss Ethel Ida Rowand. 

Lucas-Farmer. — On Wednesday, June 30, at Walterboro, S. C, Mr. Alexan- 
der Hume Lucas and Miss Lillian Hauser Farmer. 

McCarty-Ottley. — On Friday, July 9th, at Atlanta, Ga., Mr. George Wey- 
man McCarty, Jr., and Miss Passie May Ottley. 

Sto;sey-DuBose. — On Thursday, October 7th, at Columbia, S. C, Mr. Thomas 
Porcher Stoney and Miss Beverly Means DuBose. 

Brumby-Field. — On Tuesday, October 12th, at Marietta, Ga., Mr. William 
Magruder Brumby and Miss Anne Field. 

Cheshire-Shiell. — On Saturday, October 16th, at New Orleans, La., Mr. 
Godfrey Cheshire and Miss Alice Calder Shiell. 

Jones-Erwin. — On Saturday, October 23d, at Durham, N. C, Mr. Hamilton 
Chamberlain Jones and Miss Bessie Smedes Erwin. 

Small-White — On Wednesday, October 27th, at Elizabeth City, N. C, Mr. 
Walter Lowry Small and Miss Elizabeth Peele White. 

Barnes-Uzzle. — On Wednesday, November 3d, at Wilson's Mills, N. C, Mr. 
Wiley Goodlow Barnes and Miss Meta Gunn Uzzle. 

Quiktard-Joxes. — On Wednesday, November 10th, at Charlotte, N. C, Mr. 
Edward Alexander Quintard and Miss Caroline Clarke Jones. 



Football 

Sing a song of football, 

Don't it make you smile? 
Two and twenty players 

Struggling in a pile; 
When the pile is opened, 

Hear those awful groans; 
Boys begin to creep out, 

Looking for their bones. 
Sections there of noses, 

Patches here of hair, 
But they made a touchdown, 

And little do they care. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 

! readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 

! principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 

! them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 

it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Lines to a Crush 

O thou, my Crush! Being beloved afar, 

Loveliest of all the maids that meet my view, 

What word breaks from thy lips, my guiding star, 
Addressed to thine adorer fond — 
"Skidoo!" 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Co. 

THE STORE OF QU4LITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 



'It's worth the difference" 



The Tyree Studio 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses Ready-to-Wear Garments 

T311 per cent off to College Girls 



W$t Jf afiijton 



FayetteviUe 
Street 



KAPLAN BROS. CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 



'EMMES 




Exclusive 
Millinery 



RALEIGH m.C 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 

and Shoes 
208 FayetteviUe St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



Rapturous I gaze upon thy charms and sigh, 
"Thy slightest word upon my heart is writ. 

Dost love me in return? Reply, reply, 
Angelic one!" And echo answers, 
"Nit!" 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA^!) WEH&, LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 







=9 



Hoot and Toot H°ttentot 

If a Hottentot taught a Hottentot tot 
To tot ere the tot could totter, 

Ought the Hottentot tot 

To be taught to say "aught" 
Or "naught," or what ought to be taught her? 



Or— 

If to hoot and to toot a Hottentot tot 
Be taught by a Hottentot tooter, 

Should the tooter get hot if the Hottentot tot 
Hoot and toot at the Hottentot tutor? 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Saying's Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette Cafe 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOEE 

Phones 228 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 

T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 






REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 

HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



The Heroine 

We see the haughty girl advance, 
And sweep the parlor with a glance; 

Thus runs the story. 
But we never see her sweep a room 
With a common, ordinary broom; 

That isn't glory. 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Gnmpany 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Lie and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 


1 L. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 

PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 


'California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream ia the 
, 'Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Evervthing in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cabdwell & O'Kklly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



'Tis proper, too, one understands, 
To see her wringing jeweled hands 

And acting frantic; 
But we never see her quit this bosh 
And go to wringing out the wash; 

That's unromantic. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



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NEW BERN 

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Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 

H, S. LEARD, G. P. A. J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. Raleigh, N C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 

Raleigh's Leading Hotel 



Its Cafe one of the Best in the Country 


B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 


Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

COLLEGE 

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128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


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Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
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as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
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Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBEK 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these ! g. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

] 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 
5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 




tK[>e 

t Jfflarp'js JWuse 



ftaleigf), & C. 




Cfntetmas; dumber 

JSecemfoer, 1915 



The St. Mary's Muse 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



Vol. XX. 



Decembek, 1915. 



No. 3 



The Song of the Christmas Wind 



The snow came down in showers 

And over the hills and lees 
It bent the topmost bowers 

Like stately Christmas trees. 

The wind was up, and loudly, 
In rhythmic measure swinging, 

It sung with joy and proudly 

The hope the day was bringing. 

'The time is coming — nay, is nigh, 

When men will stop and hold their breath 
And cease to weakly pine and sigh, 
For lo! a Life has conquered Death." 

"And peace is come upon the earth 

To calm the hearts both far and near 
And bring to them the joy and mirth 
That banishes each cringing fear. 



"Go ye unto that stable dark 

When tossed by care in worldly strife 

And see and know and learn and mark 
His love and peace, who gave thee Life." 

Henrietta Morgan, '18. 



80 The St. Mary's Muse. 



From An Accident 



Aline Hughes, '19. 

The wind whistled in icy blasts down the snowy streets, straight 
from the frozen north. Mary had stood at the crossing, offering her 
matches and pencils for sale, until her little hands were blue, and her 
whole body pinched by the cold. It seemed to her that she had always 
been standing there, holding out her articles to the hurrying throng, 
and it was only when the crowd began to thin that she thought of 
moving on. It was in a sort of frozen, misty haze that she started 
across the slippery street, watching the big policeman. Just as she 
came to the middle of the street a great, luxurious limousine whirled 
around the corner, carrying its owner from the theatre. Before any- 
one could prevent it the car had skidded and knocked the tiny, shiver- 
ing figure down in the snow. 

Of course the policeman and the ever-ready crowd were quick in 
gathering to the scene of the accident, but even before these, Alan 
Grey, the owner of the car, was out on the snow taking the limp little 
figure up in his arms. He placed the child in the car and, having 
arranged with the policeman not to call the ambulance, he ordered 
his chauffeur to go direct to the nearest hospital. 

Down the snowy streets the great car sped, and up to the door of a 
large hospital where efficient hands were ready to give the desired 
aid. But Alan Grey, feeling all the responsibility of the accident, did 
not allow little Mary to be taken from his arms, and himself carried 
her to a private room, which he had ordered, and laid her on the bed. 
He was then sent out of the room, however, by the two doctors who 
wished to examine the patient, and in the hall he restlessly paced up 
and down. Little Mary's face reminded him so vividly of a face he 
had long been seeking that the feeling persistently came over him that 
perhaps the end of his long search was near, and it was this feeling 
that he was combating. 

While he was absorbed in his thoughts a door on the hall opened 
quietly — so quietly that he did not hear it — and a white-clad nurse 
came into the hall straight toward him. Just at this moment he 
turned in his pacing, so that they met face to face. They both stopped 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 

and gazed at each other, white faced ; then the cries of "Rose" and 
"Alan," although spoken in a whisper, bridged across the lapse of 
years. They had only a few brief minutes together, but when the 
busy nurse returned to her patient it was with a heart full of joy at 
the thought of the happy meetings soon to come. 

Ten days then passed rapidly by, and very happy ones they were, 
too, for Mary, as well as for Rose and Alan, for in the fullness of 
their own happiness they made the child happy with mysterious 
promises for the approaching Christmas. 

On Christmas morning early, soon after the sun first began to 
shine across the snow, Mary awoke smiling, to realize that she had 
been dreaming, and that the "angel music" was a choir of boys sing- 
ing the Christmas anthem of "Peace on earth, good will to men." 
Closing her eyes to hear the music better, she again drifted into sleep, 
on the wings of the song, and was only awakened by a kiss, and a 
"Merry Christmas." She was astounded for a moment by the trans- 
formation the room had gone through — Christmas bells, holly, mistle- 
toe, and a small, but gorgeous Christmas tree made the room seem 
full of joy and good cheer. 

"Oh, Nurse Rose, you are so good to me, an' I'm so happy I want 
to laugh an' cry all at once. Everything is so beautiful. I just love 
you, love you." 

"Bless your heart, darling; laugh instead of crying, because some 
more 'Christmas' is coming soon." And soon after this a knock 
sounded at the door and Alan Grey came in, his arms full of packages, 
and called "Merry Christmas." 

Then, indeed, followed a merry time, for numerous mysterious 
packages had to be opened, disclosing toys, books, and gifts of all 
kinds ; but the one which gave most happiness was a large, beautiful 
baby-doll which Mary took with hungry arms to her heart. 

While she was still joying in and crooning over her baby, Rose 
came to her side, and smiling and blushing, said : "Mary, darling, 
Alan and I have something to tell you. Would you rather hear it 
now or later ?" 

"Oh, now, now !" was the eager reply. 

So they each held one of Mary's hands and, pouring it out between 



82 The St. Mary's Muse. 

them, they told this story : Of how, because of some slight misunder- 
standing, they had parted, Rose to take up the work of a trained 
nurse, Alan to carry on the prosperous business of his father. He 
had presently discovered his mistake in the parting, but then all his 
searchings for Rose had been in vain. Meanwhile Rose had busied 
herself also, along with her work, in a search for the child of her 
only sister, left motherless and fatherless, and lost by an accident in 
the city. She had employed all means at her command, but all had 
failed. 

"And we have found, Mary dear," Rose ended, "that you are my 
own little lost niece, and, and — " 

"Listen, Mary," Alan broke in, "there is something else, too. 
Your Aunt Rose has promised to marry me soon, very soon, and 
then, dear, you are to come to live with us. Do you think you would 
like to be our little girl ?" 

"Have a home ? Call you Aunt and Uncle ? Oh, I'll always be 
good after this ; you have made me so happy I" And the little hungry 
heart felt at last that there was a place for it in the big, lonesome 
world. 

Our Christmas Jingle 



Down to the big old gym. we rush, 

For the Christmas tree is there. 
Oh, what a merry laughing fuss 

Whirls happily through the air. 

In ecstasy of pure delight 

We gaze upon the festooned tree, 
Listening, as faintly through the night 

The carols come ringing merrily. 

Then what a rush and tumble, 

As the knocks and gifts are given; 

Oh, what a gleeful jumble, 
In that merry rush is driven. 

Oh, woe upon that winking light, 

The last in this old year 
That can break upon such delight, 

Shedding its farewell Christmas cheer. 

K. W. B., '16. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 83 



A Christmas Story 



Rubie Thorn, '18. 

Barbara and Dolly were hurrying home out of the cold. At least 
they were trying to hurry, but oh ! there were so many lovely things 
in the windows of the large houses to attract their attention ! It was 
Christmas eve night. They had been down to the shops on an errand 
for their mother and had ventured to go by the homes of the rich on 
their return. The lights were dazzling, and the children, who could 
be seen through the windows, amid the many holiday decorations, 
looked so bright and happy. In one window hung a very large cedar 
wreath with a red bow, and in the center there were three letters : 
I. H. S. 

"Dolly, what does that stand for?" asked Barbara. 

"I guess it's for 'I have stockings,' " said Dolly. 

"Barbara, do you suppose Santa Claus will come to see us and 
bring us some pretty things ?" 

"Course he will. Didn't Billy say that Santa Claus never forgot 
you, no matter how poor you were V 

The two little waifs pulled their shawls closer around them to keep 
out the wind and tore themselves away from the dazzling sights. 
Their home was a typical tenement house in the slums of a large 
city, and this was the scene that greeted the two children on their 
arrival: On an uncomfortable little bed lay their mother, with a 
dangerous cold. Billy, their brother, was bringing in a piece of an 
old box to put on the fire, and Nancy, their older sister, was prepar- 
ing the frugal supper. The meals now were poorer than ever, for 
mother's doctor's bill had to be paid, and then they missed her wages. 
Barbara and Dolly didn't realize the situation to any degree, and won- 
dered why their mother smiled so sadly when they told of all the 
pretty things they had seen. The mother's heart was sad. She had 
meant to have a real Christmas for them, and their child-like faith 
in what she had told them about Santa Claus touched her. 

The children went to sleep with difficulty, because visions of toys 
and candies danced before their eyes. Soon after they were asleep 
there was a gentle rap at the door. Nancy went to open it immedi- 



84 The St. Mary's Muse. 

ately, and ushered in two well-dressed women, who had brought 
baskets of good things for the next day. These good people had 
looked out for the poor and brought joy to many hearts that night. 
What a delight Nancy took in placing the toys on the hearth and 
putting the "goodies" aside until dinner-time next day. The last 
thing was put in place when she said to her mother, "Poor little 
dears ; won't they be happy with all those pretty toys ? I would have 
been miserable to see them disappointed." 

The children were up bright and early next morning. Could they 
believe their eyes ? Right there on their own hearth were dolls for 
the girls, a horn and ball for Billy, and many other things just like 
those they had seen the night before. Could it be possible that they 
had them right there in their arms to play with as long as they wanted 
to ? The three children enjoyed the day, and when night came and 
Billy said, "I knowed old Santa wouldn't forget us," they thought 
that they were as happy as it was possible for people to be. 

****** 
Fifteen years had passed. In a comfortable little sitting-room of 
a pretty suburban cottage sat two young ladies busy fixing baskets of 
good things to take to the poor. The next day was Christmas Eve and 
the ladies wanted everyone in the suburb to have some sort of a 
Christmas. Their aged mother dozed by the fire and their older sister 
was in the kitchen preparing eatables for the baskets. The door 
opened and in burst a splendid-looking man with his arms full of 
packages. He laid them on the table with these words, "Well, girls, 
here are my contributions to the baskets." This was the very family 
that had once lived in the slums and were dependent upon charity 
for their Christmas. Fortune had smiled upon them and now they 
were living comfortably. The children thought that they were happy 
on that first Christmas day, but now they were truly happy, for they 
realized the true meaning of the words of Him who gave us Christ- 
mas day, "It is more blessed to give than to receive." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 



Seniors' Day 



I 

Ten Seniors got up in the cold gray dawn, 
And looked at the stars and yawned and yawned. 
They pulled out their books and turned on the light 
And thought of the lessons they'd shirked that night. 
For Freshmen may play and lessons shirk, 
But Seniors who play must rise and work 
Ere the breakfast bell be ringing. 

II 

Ten Seniors worked hard on a bright fall day, 
When truants were bidding them come go play; 
They longed for a game in the wind and sun, 
But English was long and had to be done; 

For Sophomores may bluff and get away, 
But Seniors who bluff won't feel so gay 
When the dinner bell is ringing. 

Ill 

Ten Seniors worked on right up to the last, 
And marveled the hours so quickly passed; 
Nine-thirty comes, and off Juniors run, 
But Seniors plod on with no hope for fun. 

For Juniors must try with all their might 
Before they'll reach that mighty height 
Of hearing their Senior bell. 

"Wibo." 



How It Happened 



Henrietta Morgan, '18. 
Long, long ago, in the clays of the Golden Age, Floriana was Queen 
of the Flower Spirits, and her husband, Grenatia, was King of the 
Grass Spirits. Both were rulers of the spirits that reigned supreme 
in the spirit world, and that kept the flowers always blooming and 
the grass always green for the further delight of human beings. Both 
were wise, good masters, and were also merely two people whose hap- 
piness widened the happiness of others. And they were very, very 
happy — in spite of their only child, the Princess Gladiola, who had 



86 The St. Maky's Muse. 

always been of such a disposition that even now, in her eighteenth 
year, she could not be trusted alone with a single spirit. 

Yet one day, or rather one night, her mother and father did leave 
her alone in the lily with a little grass spirit page. 

"]STow, come down, Gladiola; you're to stay in the front hall to 
listen out for the door bell," called the Queen, tapping at Gladiola's 
door. "Your father and I have very important business on the other 
side of the world, and the birds are waiting to take us at once. And, 
my dear child, listen to me: above all things, do not admit any one 
into the palace tonight. Send the boy out to tell them the King and 
Queen are away. Did you hear me, Gladiola ?" 

"Yes, mama," said Gladiola, languidly, already starting toward 
the door, with a book in her hand. Gladiola was an ideal princess — 
tall, fair-browed and pink-cheeked, with dark eyes and long dark 
curls. 

In the great front hall the Queen again warned her : "You are not 
to forget my instructions, Gladiola." 

"No, mama, I won't," said the Princess faintly, up from the violet 
carpet among the rose pillows, her book in her lap. 

"Be very careful, Gladiola," said a stern voice. Gladiola looked 
up then. 

"Yes, papa, I will," she promised. 

When they were a long way down the long hall, she sat up and 
called : 

"Levo, Levo ! where are you ?" 

"Here," cried a careless voice. And a little green figure came 
running toward her, tumbling somersaults as he ran. 

"Levo, Levo, stop that, this minute, and answer directly what I 
ask you. Did you hear what they kept saying to me ?" 

"Yes, my Princess," said the boy, bowing solemnly. 

"Well, what do you think is the matter with them ?" 

"I don't know, my Princess," he answered, puckering up his fore- 
head in such a grave way that the Princess laughed aloud. Soon her 
mind and eyes were on the book again. 

The truth was, the King and Queen had seemed worried, but Glad- 
iola and the boy did not know it, for then the world itself knew not 



The St. Mary's Muse. 87 

the meaning of sorrow or care. Thus the Princess and the page had 
been puzzled. 

And the tiny shadow was already .gone, for Gladiola, absorbed in 
her story, and the boy in his running and playing up and down the 
hall, were enjoying themselves to the fullest extent. The hours of 
the night flew swiftly, swiftly. The palace clock was chiming the 
hour of twelve. The last stroke was dying away — and the bell out 
at the front was sounding. 

Gladiola started up, pale-cheeked. 

"Levo, Levo,' she cried. "Oh, Levo, where are you ?" 

ISTo answer. 

"He's off somewhere, asleep," said Gladiola. "I must go to the 
door myself." 

So the Princess went hurriedly down the hall, and, reaching the 
door, without even opening it, was about to call out to dismiss the 
visitor, when through the glass she saw a sight that made her draw 
nearer. A very tall figure, draped in a long, caped cloak of all the 
colors of the rainbow, stood where the light from the hall shone full 
upon it. A head covered with a purple cap was raised — and a face 
smiled so gaily that Gladiola herself was attracted into smiles. 

"Is the door too heavy for you ? Shall I open it ?" asked a rich 
masculine voice. 

Gladiola, yes, even Gladiola considered. Her mother and father 
had warned her — yet surely they had not expected such a distin- 
guished person. Moreover, he need not stay but a few minutes. 

Concluding thus, the Princess pushed open the door and the man 
with the smiling face glided in. 

"A beautiful, a very beautiful place," said the stranger, admir- 
ingly, glancing from the violet carpet to the morning-glory tapestries. 
"You are fortunate, my Princess." 

"Yes," answered the Princess, "the hall is beautiful, but I never 
come down here. You should see my sitting-room ! I've always 
thought it so lovely that I've stayed in it almost all my life." 

"What ! You mean you've never traveled !" 

"I've never cared to." 

Thereupon, the stranger entered upon a glowing description of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



lands and the waters over which he had adventured. And his experi- 
ences ! Gladiola could scarcely believe some of them. He was tell- 
ing of how he was lost in the deserts of Africa and wandered about 
for days and days without food and water until he reached a green 
spot where there were cocoanut trees and a spring. 

Again the bell pealed forth. 

Gladiola trembled, for she was frightened and did not know what 
it meant. Oh, where could that boy Levo be ? 

But Levo was not needed, for the new visitors were fast coming 
toward them — the King and Queen themselves ! 

Gladiola's mother and father looked at Gladiola. Gladiola looked 
at her mother and father — and was terrified; the King and Queen 
looked at the stranger, the stranger looked at the King and Queen — 
and smiled and removed his rainbow cloak and stood forth almost a 
spectre in pure white. 

Again he smiled — a triumphant smile — and slid down the hall and 
out into the night. 

"Oh, my child, my child ! What have you done ?" said the hurt 
voice of Gladiola's mother. "You have disobeyed me. And now the 
Golden Age of Flower Spirits is at an end — for Jack Frost is here." 

It was, indeed, Jack Frost. And this is how it came about that 
autumn comes to blight the summer days. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



October 28— Miss Dowd's Talk 

On Thursday night, October 28th, Miss Dowd made a short, in- 
formal talk in the schoolroom. She spoke to us of the "Shoulder to 
Shoulder Touch," the great encouragement and reassurance inspired 
by fellowship, and reminded us of our unconscious influence on the 
lives of others. She told us of the great power we have to make or 
mar our own lives, and of our great opportunity, even though we do 
it unconsciously, to strengthen and encourage those about us. 

October 30 — Hallowe'en Party 

All day a feeling of mystery and excitement had pervaded the 
place. All day there had been meaning glances, mysterious whisper- 



Tpie St. Mary's Muse. 89 

ings and a great sewing, cutting and pasting behind closed doors, and 
all the afternoon girls had been gaily transforming the Gym. into a 
spooky abode for goblins and witches. Altogether every one was look- 
ing for something wonderful to happen — and it did ! As Miss Sutton 
struck the first notes of the grand march there trooped through the 
doors of the gymnasium such a motley throng as baffles description — 
ghosts, witches, pumpkins, ballet dancers, nuns, soldiers, Turks, and 
Indians, followed each other in quick succession, but perhaps the 
most striking were the darkies, the trained nurses, the stick candy, 
Charlie Chaplin, Happy and the little Hooligans, the circus girl, the 
bride and groom, and last, but by no means least, the trio : France, 
England, and America. 

As the last notes died away there arose a sepulchral groaning and 
from all directions rushed a band of black goblins who, having swept 
into the middle of the room, circled in weird dances and then melted 
away into the crowd again. These same goblins (who turned out to 
be the Seniors) were seen a little later threading their way amongst 
the crowd with baskets of popcorn and huge waiters of stick candy, 
peanuts and apples. 

As soon as the march was over the gay throng scattered to the vari- 
ous places of amusement, some to the fortune teller's tent, some to 
wend their way through the mystic maze, and some to play various 
games of chance for fortunes. 

That everybody had a good time was proved by the heart-felt 
groans that greeted the flashing of the lights, and the reluctance with 
which the crowd broke up. 

October 31— Founders' Day Celebration 

On Sunday night, October 31, 1915, an inter-society meeting was 
held in the parlor in commemoration of the founders of St. Mary's. 

The day set apart as Founders' Day is All Saints' Day, November 
1st, but owing to the fact that this year it fell on Monday, the meet- 
ing was held the evening before. 

The program for the evening was an unusually good one. Frances 
Geitner, as President of the Alpha Rho Society, presided, and her 
opening address gave a short account of the Rectors of St. Mary's 
and how Founders' Day is set apart not only to commemorate those 



90 The St. Mart's Muse. 

who have been especially instrumental in founding the School, but 
also all those who by their presence in the School have formed a part 
of it. A paper on the Rev. Aldert Smedes as founder of St. Mary's 
was read by Josephine Myers ; the work of his successor, the Rev. 
Bennett Smedes, was read by Rena Harding, while Emma Badham 
gave an interesting account of the work of the late Rectors. 

To Miss Katie and Miss Glen are we especially indebted for their 
charming talks. Miss Katie spoke of the School in general and its 
early Rectors, whose acquaintance she enjoyed, while Miss Glen gave 
us some of the ideas of St. Mary's which had always impressed her 
and made her wish she could have been a St. Mary's girl. The pro- 
gram was concluded with the singing of the Alma Mater. 

J. S. W., '16. 
November 1 — All Saints' Day 

As All Saints' Day fell this year on Monday, the All Saints' serv- 
ice and sermon were held on Sunday morning. The altar was 
beautiful with autumn leaves and white chrysanthemums and every 
one joined heartily in the hymns and responses. 

In his sermon Dr. Lay spoke of those who have gone before us and 
of the great work that they have done, emphasizing the fact that we 
have our part in their work and are, ourselves, in a way, founders in 
that we are helping to establish the principles for which St, Mary's is 
to stand. 

The afternoon address was delivered by Rev. Mr. Nash, of South- 
ern Pines, on the mistake in these times of not following more 
literally the teachings of our Lord. 

The early service on Monday morning was attended by a large 
majority of the School and shortened morning Prayer was held at 
nine o'clock. 

November 1 — The First Basketball Game 

The first basketball game between the Sigmas and the Mus was 
played Monday afternoon, November 1st, The game, to be played so 
early in the year, showed excellent team work on both sides, the work 
of Sarah Rawlings being especially good. The teams were evenly 
matched, and at the end of the first half the score was 5 to 2 in favor 
of the Sigmas. During the first part of the second half it appeared 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 

that the score was not to be changed, the guards on each side doing 
such quick work, especially Laura Beatty and Annie Robinson, but 
finally Elizabeth Waddell proved too much for the Mus, and at the 
finish of the game the Sigma score was brought up to 10 against the 
Mus' score of 6. 

November 2 — Alumnae Meeting 

On Tuesday afternoon, November 2d, the Raleigh Alumnse held 
their annual Founders' Day meeting in the parlor at St. Mary's. 
Mrs. Snow, the president of the chapter, presided over the meeting, 
and several interesting talks were made. 

Miss Isabelle Busbee spoke of arousing greater interest in the 
alumna?., and urged them to attend the recitals, plays, and other 
affairs of general interest at the school, that, becoming better ac- 
quainted with the faculty and girls, they might give more correct 
information about them. 

Mrs. Knox spoke from the experience of having been in the school 
last year. She said that the old St. Mary's spirit still existed ; that 
the girls were very happy here, and that she had found nothing to 
criticise. 

Mrs. Root offered the suggestion that Mrs. Mann be requested to 
get up a children's entertainment for the benefit of the Iredell-Mc- 
Kimmon scholarship, the fund for which they hope to close by June. 
1916. 

Altogether, the meeting was a very enthusiastic and interesting 
one and was attended by quite a large number of people. 

November 3 — Faculty Reception 

On Wednesday afternoon, November 3d, a faculty reception was 
held in the parlor. Tea and sandwiches were served to the guests, 
and the afternoon was passed in pleasant conversation. 

November 4 — Miss Davis and Miss Phillips Entertain the Faculty 

On Thursday afternoon, November 4th, Miss Davis and Miss 
Phillips entertained the faculty at a lovely party in the Muse Room, 
which was beautifully decorated with chrysanthemums and autumn 
leaves. Delicious refreshments of chicken salad, mints, and orange 
ice were served, while at one end of a long center table Miss Katie 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 

served hot coffee, and tea was served at the other end by Miss Lil 
Fenner. 

The party was one of the most attractive ones of the year, and 
Miss Phillips and Miss Davis made, indeed, charming hostesses. 

November 4 — Dr. Brewer's Talk 

On Thursday night, November 4th, we had the pleasure of having 
with us Dr. Brewer, the new president of Meredith College. After 
a few pleasant informal words Dr. Brewer spoke to us of the effects 
of college training, and dwelt on the benefits to be gained from its 
two phases : college learning and college life. We hope to have the 
pleasure of another talk from Dr. Brewer during the year. 

November 5 — Expression Pupils' Eecital 

On Friday afternoon, November 5th, Miss Davis' private pupils 
gave a very entertaining recital in the auditorium. The good results 
of Miss Davis' teaching were well shown by the excellent work of 
the girls. Every one did their part well, and the recital was greatly 
enjoyed. 

November 5 — Miss Tbomas Entertains the Juniors 

The Juniors greatly enjoyed a most original party on Friday, 
November 5th, given by Miss Thomas. It might have been called a 
Zoo Party. First, they were entertained by hearing all about Miss 
Thomas' Western trijj- As soon as all the guests had arrived each 
was presented with a sheet of newspaper and a little slip of paper 
with a number on it and the name of some animal.. The game which 
followed was the hard task of tearing out of the newspaper the shape 
of the animal written on the little slip of paper. After much fun, 
the animals were tacked on the wall, while the animal which received 
the most right guesses as to name received the prize. Eva Peel's 
life-like squirrel got it. 

After being served with a "grand" salad course the Juniors left, 
declaring that it was the nicest party of the year. A. C. L., '17. 

November 5 — 3Iiss Thomas Entertains the Seniors 

Friday night, November 5th, the Seniors had the pleasure of be- 
ing Miss Thomas' guests at a lovely hot supper. Her study, deco- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 93 

rated in yellow, looked very festive with masses of big yellow chrys- 
anthemums. The Junior menagerie was greatly admired, especially 
the squirrel. The proof of their pleasure was shown by the reluct- 
ance with which they parted ; in fact, their hostess found it necessary 
to request them to leave. J. S. W., '16. 

November 6 — The Carnival 

There is a great deal of curiosity displayed each year on the part 
of the new girls when they hear that a real carnival is to be given in 
school. They can't quite picture it, and their curiosity was in- 
creased and their interest aroused still more when they saw Anne 
Brinley dressed as a clown carrying a banner all around school to 
advertise it. 

The carnival was held in the basement this year on the 6th of 
November, and under the direction of the Muse Club it was a splen- 
did success. Ice-cream was served by Katherine Drane and Sarah 
Borden from a booth very attractively arranged with yellow crepe 
paper and chrysanthemums. Violet Bray had charge of the candy 
booth, decorated in red and white. A unique little corner served for 
the fruit-stand, autumn leaves being an appropriate background, 
where Eleanor Relyea and Virginia Allen presided. Frances Cheat- 
ham and Elmyra Jenkens sold popcorn from a tastefully decorated 
red and green stand, and Annie Cameron, Katherine Bourne, and 
Rubie Thorn sold "hot dogs," which were, as usual, very popular. 

The vaudeville show was the center of amusement. This was 
under the management of Josephine Wilson, whose ingenius efforts 
afforded all of us a great deal of pleasure. Elizabeth Corbitt and 
Martha Wright displayed stage talent in their songs and dances with 
the "sailor boys," and Helen Wright rendered the accompaniments 
beautifully. The comic orchestra was under the direction of Frances 
Tillotson, and was highly entertaining. R. Thorn. 

November 8 — Junior Basketball Game 

At the match game Monday afternoon between the Junior Mu and 
Sigma teams especially good team work was shown in the center. 
Garrigue (Sigma) and Sublett (Mu), who were playing side center, 
were always right in place, and the jumping centers, Cross (Sigma) 
and Swett (Mu), seemed to pull the ball out of the air. 



94 The St. Maey's Muse. 

At the end of the first half the score was 4 to in favor of the 
Mus. In the second half the guards, Jenson (Sigma) and Burke 
(Mil), played especially well, while the low score at the end of the 
game of 4 to 1 in favor of the Mus speaks for the general good play- 
ing of every one else. A. C. L., '17. 

November 11 — Pupils' Recital 

On every other Thursday afternoon recitals are held in the audi- 
torium by the music pupils. An especially good recital was given 
on November 11th. Every one did well, and we were especially 
glad to hear again our old friends, Martha Wright and Frances Til- 
lotson. Another thing deserving special mention was the violin trio, 
which was excellent. The recital showed the results of good work, 
and the program was greatly enjoyed. 

November 11 — Dr. Lay's Talk 

On Thursday evening, November 11th, Dr. Lay spoke a few words 
in the schoolroom on the subject of the Nation-wide Preaching Mis- 
sion to be held during the first two weeks of Advent. 

This movement is to be observed at St. Mary's by special services 
held on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights of these 
two weeks. These services are to be entirely voluntary, and will 
consist of shortened evening prayer and an address. We are for- 
tunate in that the addresses are to be made by the Rev. Milton A. 
Barber of Christ Church. 

November 11 — Alfred Noyes 

On Thursday night, November 11th, quite a number of both 
faculty and students had the pleasure of attending the reading given 
in Meredith auditorium by Alfred Noyes, the famous young English 
poet. Mr. Noyes read many interesting and beautiful selections 
from his works, and the evening was thoroughly enjoyed by every 
one. 

November 13— Mrs. and Miss Lay Entertain the Seniors 

On Saturday evening the Seniors were delightfully entertained 
at the rectory. After being graciously welcomed we went into the 
parlor, and the fun began. Every one present had some "stunt" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 



ready, and as the last one Dr. Lay read a poem to the Seniors entitled 
"These Ten" : 

"The virgins ten of Bible story 

Did not obtain an equal glory, 

For five were foolish, five were wise; 

These ten present the latter guise. 

"With well-trimmed lamp that's burning bright, 
Each strives to see the path aright, 
With vessel pure to furnish light 
Till day shall come to conquer night. 

"These ten may e'en surpass the five 
Whose prudence seemed for self to strive. 
As they've received, so they may spend, 
And of abundance freely lend." 

Next, we were given cards on which to write the names of the per- 
sons described in the verses which Dr. Lay read us. Helen Wright 
received a chrysanthemum for getting the largest number right. Two 
courses of delicious refreshments were served, and we were each given 
a lovely chrysanthemum. 

The time for leaving came all too soon, and we all left, declaring 
what a lovely party it had been. 

November 15 — Faculty Recital 

On Monday night, November 15th, Miss Seymour, assisted by a 
string quartette, gave the second faculty recital in the auditorium. 
The News and Observer said of the recital : 

Miss Louise Seymour gave a brilliant and interesting program last evening 
at St. Mary's School auditorium. The first number, Bach-St. Saens Gavotte, 
Scarlatti Pastorale, and Mende'ssohn Scherzo were played with keen intelli- 
gence and delicate appreciation of the classics. Throughout the program 
Miss Seymour played with the confidence which comes of sure technique and 
mastery of the selections. 

1 he last number, a Liszt Tarantella, bristled with technical difficulties and 
varieties of tone-color. Miss Seymour met these demands bravely and bril- 
liantly, finishing in a storm of applause from the audience. 

The String Quartette (Haydn, G major) lost none of its genial charm in 
the rendering of Miss Muriel Abbott, first violin ; Mr. Kimbrough Jones, sec- 
ond violin; Mr. Gustav Hagedorn, violin; Mr. Wilbur Royster, violincello. 



96 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The menuetto and Presto movements were specially appreciated, and the 
audience clamored for more, but in vain. 

The full program was as follows: 

I. 
Gavotte in B minor Bach— St Saens 

(1685-1750) (1835-) 

Pastorale in E minor Scarlatti (1683-1757) 

Scherzo in E minor Mendelssohn (1809-1847) 

II. 

Quartette in G minor Haydn (1732-1809) 

Allegro con brio 
Allegretto 
Menuetto 
Presto 

III. 
Nocturne, Op. 32, No. 1 ) 
Polonaise, Op. 26, No. 1 } Gh0 P in (1810-1849) 

IV. 

On Wings of Song Mendelssohn-Liszt 

Tarantella Liszt (1811-1886) 

November 20 — Seniors Entertain the Sophomores 

At eight-fifteen, in the old dining hall, 

The Seniors bid the Sophomores — one and all — 

Come prepared to have a jolly good time 

Till by the clock it's half-past nine; 

Gingham dresses — no silks allowed; 

'Tis hoped you'll prove a merry crowd. 

Thus ran the invitation received by the Sophomores on Saturday, 
November 20th. A jolly evening began with the unwinding of a 
huge spider web which filled the entire room with its network. 
Elizabeth Corbitt proved to be the first to untangle her long string 
and find at the end a small basket filled with candy hearts. When 
the others had reached their prizes, all were requested to enter the 
small adjoining room, which was transformed by the masses of beau- 
tiful autumn leaves and chrysanthemums, there to be served with hot 
chocolate and delicious lettuce sandwiches. Later, amidst much 
laughter, all joined in a candy pull. Such a happy hour was spent! 
With buttery fingers, each one pulled first a rope of sugar candy until 
it was creamy and white, and then a rope of molasses candy. Alto- 
gether, the girls did prove to be "a merry crowd," and the party a 
most original one. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 97 

November 20 — Junior-Fresliman Party 

"Ye Juniors bid tbeir dere sisters, ye Freshmen, to come on Saturday night, 
at 8:15, to ye Parlor. Ye are praied to wear such costumes as befitted ye 
Goodmen and their Wyves and Daughters who came to these shores in ye May- 
flower in the year of our Lord 1620." 

Such was the invitation received by the little Freshmen from their 
older sisters Monday morning. 

When the demure Priscillas and stalwart John Aldens arrived at 
the parlor Saturday they found it transformed into a veritable forest 
of tall ferns and autumn leaves. After the Puritans had arrived the 
door opened and four fierce-looking Indians glided in. However, 
they proved to be friendly. 

The main feature of the evening was a contest — a story of the 
Courtship of Miles Standish — the guests being requested to fill in 
the blanks in the story. The prize, a dainty little basket, was won by 
Miss Sara Wood. 

After the contest, Miss Josephine Frohne, one of the Indians, fav- 
ored us with Indian dances. The "War Dance" especially was so 
very realistic that it was quite a relief to eat apples and bananas after- 
wards. After that, the favors — fat little turkeys sitting on logs and 
stumps filled with candy corn — were handed out. 



School Personals 



Emma Badham, '17, and Nellie Rose, '17. 

Elizabeth Corbitt had a visit from her father on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 7th. 

Miss Frances Smoot, of North Wilkesboro, 23". C, visited Helen 
Weakley, October 31st. 

Nellie Rose had a visit from her mother October 30th. 

Mrs. Wilkinson (Mary Sturgeon, of Gary, N. C.) and Mrs. Col- 
lier (Betty Sturgeon, of Atlanta) took lunch with Mrs. Cruikshank 
on Founders' Day. 

Sadie Braxton had a visit from her mother last week. 

Mrs. Holmes, of Chapel Hill, and Mrs. Jones, with her two chil- 
dren, visited Mrs. Cruikshank last week. 



98 ■ The St. Mary's Muse. 



Jennie Woodruff, who is teaching in the Wilmington schools, 
spent the week-end with Annie Cameron October 30th. 

Charlotte Howard had a pleasant visit from her mother and father 
several weeks ago. 

Frances Pusey, a last year's student of St. Mary's, visited the 
school October 30th. 

It seems that last week an epidemic of "going home" broke out in 
the school. Mae Tredwell, Mamie and Dolores Holt, Eobena Car- 
ter, Jaque Smith, Margaret Best, Selena Galbraith, and Constance 
Kent were among the victims of this dread disease. 

We are glad to hear that Louise Arbogast, who was operated on 
in Asheville for appendicitis, is getting on nicely, and we hope she 
will soon be with us again. 

Lallie McLaws went home November 7th on account of an attack 
of appendicitis, which we hope will not reoccur, so that she will 
return to the school again soon. 

Mr. Bryan visited Julia, Sunday, October 31st. 

Novella Moye had a visit from her mother and sister on Sunday, 
November 7th. 

We are all glad to see Robena Carter, Margaret Best, Jaque 
Smith, Mary Tredwell, Constance Kent, and Dolores Holt back again 
after a visit to their homes. 

We hope that Mr. Cruikshank will have a pleasant trip to Mary- 
land and will enjoy his well-deserved holiday. 

Sue Lamb had the pleasure of a short visit from her two sisters, 
Olivia and Mary Lamb, on the 11th. 

We were all glad to see Elizabeth Tarry and Helen Peoples on 
the 14th, and we wish they could have stayed longer. 

Julia Bryan enjoyed a visit from her father and uncle on the 
14th. 

Miss Alice Edward Jones, who taught Latin at St. Mary's for sev- 
eral years, and Mrs. Noyes, with her two grandchildren, were guests 
at the school the week-end of October 30th. 

Mamie Holt has had recently a very pleasant visit from Miss 
Harriet Hardison. 

Helen and Martha Wright enjoyed a visit from their mother No- 
vember 15th. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 99 

Miss Rebecca Scott spent a few days of last week with Margaret 
Best. 

Charlotte Howard enjoyed a short visit from her father Monday, 
November 15th. 

Wirt Jordan, a last year's girl, has been spending several days 
with Elizabeth Corbitt. 

Miss Katie, Miss Glen, and Miss Dowd enjoyed spending a week- 
end in Chapel Hill with Mrs. Holmes. 

Miriam Holiday and Roberta Dixon enjoyed visits from their 
fathers on the 21st. 

The Raid of the Rat 



Through the dark and silent stillness, 
At the solemn hour of midnight, 
Came a sound of gentle tapping, 
Came a scraping and a scratching 
From the corner by the dresser. 
In her bed amongst the pillows, 
Studious Sue was softly sleeping 
When she heard this gentle tapping, 
Heard this scraping and this scratching. 
She sat up in bed and listened, 
Felt her hair rise, felt her breath stop, 
Fled in terror to her room-mate, 
Shook her, crying, "Listen, listen!" 
Sobbing, pleading, "Turn the light on!" 
But her room-mate, thus awakened, 
Cried in accents full of horror: 
"I to cross that darkened vastness! 
I encounter beasts and perils! 
Nay, I will not risk my life thus, 
Nay, I will not turn the light on! 
On the dresser lay a pickle 
And beside it was a cracker. 
In and out amongst the silver, 
'Mongst the puffs and powder-boxes, 
Crept a large and bold intruder, 
Seeking for the food which lay there. 
In their beds, consumed with terror, 
Shivering with fear and horror, 
Lay the owners of the pickle, 
Lay the victims of the tyrant. 



100 The St. Maky's Muse. 

O'er the floor with dreadful scamperings 

Came the Rat, for thus his name was; 

Sprang up quickly on the girl's bed; 

Racing lightly o'er the comfort, 

He sprang nimbly on her pillow. 

Up she jumped with screams of horror, 

Clutching madly at the bedclothes; 

Called in terror for assistance, 

But in vain, because her room-mate 

Had her head beneath the bedclothes, 

And a pillow was upon it. 

In the corner by her bedside, 

Resting on the radiator, 

Lay a fat unwieldy French book, 

Lay a huge French Dictionary. 

This she grasped and, filled with courage, 

Hurled it boldly towards the dresser. 

What a smash and what a clatter! 

What a crash of broken china! 

What a scattering of trinkets! 

What a wail of consternation, 

And what squealing and what scampering! 

Now, awakened by this uproar, 

Down the hall the girls came flying, 

Gathered quickly at the doorway, 

Cried in wonder, "What's the matter?" 

From within came sounds of conflict, 

Sounds of squealing and of scrambling, 

When on suddenly looking upward, 

There, descending through the transom, 

Came a rat, all black and bristling. 

Then such racing and such scattering, 

And such flying down the hallway! 

But within there reigned confusion 

Worse confounded, for the dresser 

Was demolished and dismantled; 

All the china lay in fragments, 

All the ornaments were broken. 

In the midst of this destruction, 

Of this awful devastation, 

Sobbing with despair and anguish, 

Stood the victims of oppression; 

And they vowed in deepest penitence, 

Vowed with tears and sighs of sorrow, 

"Vowed that they would put a pickle 

Ne'er again upon the dresser, 

Nor a single cracker by it. 

"We'll be neat, and we'll be tidy; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 

We will put things in their places." 
And so deep was their affliction 
And so great was the destruction, 
That they strictly kept their promise, 
To this very day they keep it, 
Keep their room the pink of neatness. 
And to all who wonder at it 
They reply, "We've had a lesson. 
When the Rat has come to see you, 
You will be reformed like we are." 

A. S. C, '16. 



Oddities of trje Great. 

Such was the attitude of Julius Caesar toward tobacco that not one 
cigarette was smoked in Rome during' his entire lifetime. 

Abraham Lincoln would never set foot in an automobile. 

Napoleon Bonaparte would not have a telephone in his house. 

Although several times elected to the Senate, Cicero would not be 
seen in a frock coat at even the most formal sessions of that body. 

So great was his dislike for electrical contrivances of all sorts that 
George Washington would not even use the telegraph to transmit 
news of the Yorktown victory to Congress. 

Nero, fond as he was of music, refused to allow a phonograph or 
self -playing piano to be brought into Italy during his long reign. 

Christopher Columbus pointedly omitted all mention of Roosevelt's 
name in his report of famous Americans he had met. Nor could he 
be induced to visit New York. — Selected. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price * - * ' One Dollar. 

Single Copies Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE. 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberly Bourne, '16 \ t> • „ »*■„.,.,„„_, 

Fannie Marie Stallinos, '16 ) Business Managers 



EDITORIAL 



And so the time has come at last — the beautiful, wonderful, longed- 
for time ! We have counted down to hours and minutes, we have 
scratched off the days, one by one, on the backs of our English pads, 
and now, at last, our dream is to come true, and we are really going 
home. 

But while we are having such a wonderful time don't let's forget 
St. Mary's. Let's keep our eyes and ears wide open for any new 
ideas or suggestions we may come across — attractive things to do at 
parties, interesting things to bring up in society meetings, and all 
sorts of good suggestions for the Monthly and the Annual. 

This is the j oiliest time in all the year, and in the midst of all the 
gladness and rejoicing the Muse wishes to be among the first to wish 
everybody a merry, merry Christmas, and hopes to welcome back 
each and every one after the holidays. 



Witb the Rector 



From October 26th to 28th Dr. Lay attended the Convocation of 
Charlotte, and from November 17th to 19th he attended the Con- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 103 

vention of the Diocese of Atlanta, in Columbus, Ga., where, by invi- 
tation of Bishop Nelson, he spoke on "The Purpose and Value of a 
Church School." 

The Mission Study Class 



A Mission Study Class has been started under the leadership of 
Miss Richards, who is doing mission work at St. Augustine's. The 
class is for the purpose of awakening greater interest in missions by 
a truer knowledge and understanding of them, and of preparing girls 
for future church work at home. The class is to meet every Sunday 
night until the Christmas holidays, and hopes to accomplish much in 
that time. 

THE MONTH AHEAD 



The Athletic Program 

Great enthusiasm has been shown in basketball this year. Each 
athletic club having so many good players, to justify those players, 
an entirely new order of teams has been arranged. The main team 
is, of course, the first team, but we find it unfair to rank the remain- 
ing players as second, third, and fourth teams, so they are divided 
off into squads. Each squad is a team, but they distinguish them- 
selves by such names as Omicrons (Mu), Tillcums (S), the Junior 
team, etc. 

The first challenge for this month was the challenge of the Sigma 
Juniors to the Mu Juniors. The game was played Monday, Novem- 
ber 8th. Score, 5 to 2 in favor of the Mus. 

November and December Schedule 

November 22. 
Finals of Tennis Tournament. 

November 29. 
Sigma Mu 

Red Sox vs. Green Sox 

(Mardre, Captain) (Davis, Captain) 



104 The St. Mary's Muse. 

December 6. 
The First Team's second game. 

December 13. 
Mu Sigma 

Billikens vs. Skidoos 

(Askew, Captain) (Ivey, Captain) 

The championship for basketball will be given this year to the 
club which, at the end of the year, scores the most points. Each first 
team victory scores 5 points, and any other team victory scores 3. 

A. C. L., '17. 
December 6 — IT. N. C. Dramatic Cluh 
On Monday night, December 6th, the U. 1ST. C. Dramatic Club 
will present "The Witching Hour" in St. Mary's auditorium. 

All those who have seen their former plays will look forward to 
the event with much pleasure. 

December 16 — The Christmas Entertainment 

On Thursday night, December 16th, the annual Christmas enter- 
tainment will be held in the gymnasium. ]STo one who has seen it 
will ever forget the fun and frolic of this night — the big Christmas 
tree rising from the midst of mountains of candy, fruits, and presents, 
Santa Claus with his jolly red face and his four little elves, and last, 
but by no means the least, the gay, happy throng that surges about 
the tree laughing and talking and singing Christmas carols. Every- 
body is going home tomorrow, so everybody is happy, everybody is 
gay, and everybody has the nicest, j oiliest time of the whole year. 



Other Coming Events 



Miss Davis has many plans, both for her private pupils and for 
the Dramatic Club, but through sickness and the absence of some of 
the girls things are still rather uncertain. However, we know that 
whatever Miss Davis has planned, and whenever it is given, it will 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 

be well worth seeing, and we are looking forward to it with great 
pleasure and enthusiasm. 

Mr. Owen and the Chorus Class are working away on the 
"Mikado/' and from all appearances the opera will be fine. We are 
all looking forward to it and are sure of its success. 



Exchanges 



We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following: The 
Red and White, The Tatler, Isaqueena, State Normal Magazine, 
Davidson College Magazine, The Spokesman, Stetson Weekly Col- 
legiate, The College Message, Winthrop Journal, Sage, The High 
School Gazette, The Electron, The Trinity Archive, and The Florida 
Flambeau, The Chronicle, The Quill, The Oracle, Horae Scholasti- 
cae, The Tattler, and The Wesleyan. 



A Geographical Love Song 



In the State of Mass. there lives a lass I love to go IS. C. ; no other 
Miss, can e'er, I Wis., be half so dear to Me. R. I. is blue and her 
cheeks the hue of shells where waters swash ; on her pink-white phiz 
there JSTev. Ariz, the least complexion Wash. La. ! could I win the 
heart of Minn., I'd ask for nothing more, but I only dream upon the 
theme, and Conn, it o'er and Ore. Why is it, pray, I can't Ala. this 
love that makes me 111. ? 1ST. Y., O., Wy. Nan. ISTev. Ver. I propose to 
her my will ? I shun the task 'twould be to ask this gentle maid to 
wed. And so,>, to press my suit, I guess, Alaska Pa. instead. — Selected. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary IredslI, Raleigh. 

HONORARY VxCE-PrESIDENTS - { £ LKSlT^Sburham. 

President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - - - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



The Founders' Day Muse, which is to be given up to matters of 
especial Alumnae interest, and especially to contain an account of 
the campaign for collecting the information necessary for the publica- 
tion of the Alumnae Register and for completing the Alumnae 
Scholarship Fund, has been delayed in order to give accounts of all 
the Founders' Day Meetings of the Alumnae. 

A goodly number of Chapter Meetings were held this year, but 
some of them were several weeks delayed and the reports have just 
been received. The Alumnae Muse will now be published about 
December 10th. 

While the results of the campaign to date have not been as en- 
couraging as might be wished, it is still possible, as was stated in the 
beginning, to accomplish the purposes if all the Alumnae will work 
together and each will do her part. There has been a lull in the work 
since the Founders' Day Meetings, but it will now be pushed until 
the first of the year. The Alumnae are asked to do everything pos- 
sible to help in the ways which have been and will be indicated. 



Witb the Class of 1913 

Jennie Woodruff, '13. 
"Gone, but not forgotten." We all want this to be the case always 
at St. Mary's, for we can never forget what she has done for each 
and every one of us. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 107 



Just before we said goodbye to each other we had the pleasure of 
seeing ourselves as one of our classmates thought we would be in 
twenty years. We cannot yet say that she was wrong, but we can 
say what we are doing now two years from then. 

First, each and all of us are wishing that we had just begun at 
St. Mary's, not as Freshmen, but as Preps. But as that cannot be 
helped, we will tell as much as we have been able to collect in the last 
two weeks. 

Bessie White was our first to get married, but Caroline Jones was 
not long in following, as she had a very lovely wedding on the 10th of 
October. 

Amy Winston writes of a very busy and gay summer, running 
from one house party to another. She waited on Bessie Erwin and 
also attended Caroline's wedding. 

Elizabeth Cherry, after teaching at Marshall, 1ST. C, has decided 
to rest for a while. 

Mary Butler taught at home for two years, but this year she is 
evidently trying to make the "All Southern Basketball Team," from 
her account of exercising. 

Alice Lacy has moved away from Raleigh and is now living in 
Andersonville, Ga. 

Rebecca Kyle is busy making friends in Norfolk, while Lizzie 
Lee is at home taking in the gaieties of A. and M. and the city. 

Jennie Woodruff is teaching in Wilmington. The past summer 
she spent visiting old St. Mary's girls. She visited Frances Sears 
Cage and the Eastern Shore girls. 

Susannah Busbee, as a Junior at Smith, is continuing the splendid 
record she made as a Freshman and Sophomore. 

Margaret Leard, Ellen Johnson, and Evelyn Maxwell have not 
been heard of lately, but we hope there will be something interesting 
to say of them before the next number of the Muse. 



108 The St. Mart's Muse. 



ALUMNAE MARRIAGES 



SMITH-WRIGHT. On Wednesday, August 18th, at Gibson, N. C, Mr. James 
Alfred Smith and Miss Bernice Mclntyre Wright. At home, Little Rock, 
N. C. 

LONDON-EVERETT. On Thursday, November 18th, at Rockingham, N. C, 
Mr. Isaac Spencer London and Miss Lena Payne Everett. At home, Siler 
City, N. C. 

SMITH-CARRISON. On Wednesday, November 24th, at Camden, S. C, Mr. 
Carl Ray Smith and Miss Hallie Jordan Carrison. At home, Timmonsville, 
S. C. 

CHESHIRE-ROGERSON. On Saturday, November 27th, at Edenton, N. C, 
Mr. Joseph Blount Cheshire, Jr., and Miss Ida Jean Rogerson. At home, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

SO'RELLE-HARDY. On Saturday, November 27th, at Jackson, N. C, Mr. 
Walter Byrd So'Relle and Miss Alexina Douglas Hardy. At home, New 
York City. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
i readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206- to MASONIC TEMPLE 



S. G. — "Oh! what a beautiful ring! Is it an heirloom?" 

N. L. (indignantly) — "No, indeed; it's a genuine amethyst!" 

G. M. (presiding at the head of the table) — "Oh! girls, I feel so important. 
I feel like the Queen of England when she's being inaugurated." 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Co. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 



'It's worth the difference" 



Tke Tyree Studio 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 



Fayetteville 
Street 



Ten per cent off to College Girls 

tEfje Jf asfjton 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 




j Exclusive 

o Millinery 



RALEIGH m.C 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Rnleisrh, N. C. 
Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 

and Shoes 
208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



Voice from the back of the English room: "Did Milton write 'To a Daisy'?" 

Miss T. (to two girls requesting permission to visit in West Raleigh) — 
"Now, if you go out in the A. & M. direction, you'll have to walk a chalk line." 
Girls in chorus — "But we want to ride; it's too far to walk." 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES ETHIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

i3ell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 



JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 




^ r^ 



t=? a / .r-.ir=r /-/. /V. O*. ^S 



THE SKEETER. 

The skeeter is a bird of prey 
Which flies about at night. 

About three-eighths of it is beak 
And five-eighths appetite, 

And fifteen-eighths or so is buzz 
And nineteen-eighths is bite. 

— Ex. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette Cafe 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRI CE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 
Raleigh Frenels Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

HOTEL GIERSCH 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 

T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 



RICH JEWELRY 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 
Saunders Street 

HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



In Chapel — "Why doesn't everybody wait till everybody gets out, so there 
won't be such a rush?" — Ex. 





MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 


M. Rosenthal 


VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards & Broughton Printing 




Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



ts Cafe one of the Best in the Country 



Raleigh's Leading Hotel 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



O. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 


L. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 

Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind.'* Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Evervthing in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kully, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 







CALENDAR. 

Dec. 4 (Saturday) 8:30— "The Mikado." 

Dec. 6 (Monday)— U. N. C. Dramatic Club. 

Dec. 16 (Thursday) 8:15 — Christmas Entertainment. 

Dec. 17 (Friday) — Christmas Holidays Begin. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

NORFOLK -w-- 

ilWlll Wkii GOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Double Daily Express Service 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 

H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

RA.LEIGU, N. C 



,[ Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

■s instruction in these $, THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

De * art ™ nts: ) 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 

f 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 



SJje 






g>t jWarp'* Jttusse 



fcaleigf), .& C 







Heto gear's J&umter 

Jamiarp, 1916 



SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1916 



January 4 — Regular work resumed. 7 :00 p. m. 

January 20-22 — Mid-year Examinations. v 

January 24 — Geraldine Farrar Concert. City Auditorium. 8:30 

p. m. 
January 31 — The Misses Fuller in Old English Folk Song. Third 

Peace-St. Mary's -Concert. 8 :30 p. m. 
February 5 — Inter-Class Parties. 8 :00-9 :00 p. m. 

Sophomore-Senior — Muse Room. 

Freshman-Junior — Parlor. 
February 12 — Valentine Party. Parlor. 8 :00-9 :00. 
February 19— Colonial Ball. Parlor. 8:00-9:00. 
February 26 — Parlor Entertainment. 8 :00-9 :00. 
March 4 — University of North Carolina Glee Club. St. Mary's 

Auditorium. 8:15 p. m. 
March 8 — Ash Wednesday. Holy Day. 
March 20 — First Inter-Society Debate. 

Alpha Rho-Sigma Lambda. 8 :00. 
March 27 — Second Inter-Society Debate. 

Alpha Rho-Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
April 3 — Third Inter-Society Debate. 

Sigma Lambda-Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
April 9 — Passion Sunday. Bishop's Annual Visitation. 5 :00 p. m. 
April 21 — Good Friday. Holy Day. 
April 23 — Easter Day. 

April 24 — Easter Monday. Easter Egg Hunt. 7 :00 p. m. 
April 29 — "Junior-Senior Banquet." Muse Room. 8 :15 p. m. 
May 6— Fifth Annual "School Party." Parlor. 8:15 p. m. 
May 12 — Alumnae Day. 74th Anniversary of the opening of St. 

Mary's. 
May 13 — Annual Chorus Recital. 
May 16-18 — Senior Examinations. 
May 18-20 — Final Examinations. 
May 20-22 — Commencement Season. 



EDWARDS • BROUSHTON FR1NTINS CO.. RALIIOH. H. C 



The St. Mary's Muse 

NEW YEAR'S NUMBER 

Vol. XX January, 1916 No. 4 

A Happy New Year 



The year of 1915 

Shook off his garments old 

Ere chimes in high church towers 

The passing year had tolled. 

Draws near a youthful figure 

In snowy robes of white, 

Not torn by stone, unstained by dust, 

His face with hope all bright. 

"My son, the road before you 
Is long, and sad, and hard; 
'Tis not such happy journey 
As sung of by gay bard. 
I've passed through death and sorrow; 
I've seen the fields of war; 
The dark, drear clouds of suff'ring 
Hung o'er me near and far." 

But the hearts of youthful beings, 
In spite of saddening tales, 
Are hopeful for the best e'er 
'Till every project fails. 
'The fast approaching journey, 
Father, I do not fear, 
But only trust that I, '16," 
Shall be a happy New Year." 

A. E. H., '18. 



110 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Wanted— A Birthday 



Eijzaeeth A. Lay, '15. 

Peggy scarcely waited till the door closed behind her before she 
burst out, "Please, Miss Mary, I've got sumpthin important to tell 
you. It's a secrid ! Cross your heart you'll never tell. Now listen — 
I'm goin' to give away my birthday. Yes, and it's day after tomor- 
row, an' I want you to help me, 'cause it's for a little lame boy at the 
hospital." 

Miss Mary was quite used to all the little secrets and plans of the 
children in her school. They usually meant parties and "I'm goin' to 
bring you some flowers tomorrow," and little scraps of small boy quar- 
rels and little girl love affairs. Here was a new "secrid." Still Miss 
Mary was not surprised. Peggy was always doing the most surprising 
things, and now since her father had married again Miss Mary was 
almost a mother to her and shared all her hopes and plans, as well as 
candy and flowers. 

"Father gave me five dollars for my birthday. I told him to give it 
to me early 'cause I had a special use for it. He didn't ask me any- 
thing. I most 'spect he didn't care what I did with it. Can — do you 
'spose we could have a birthday cake? This little boy never had a 
birthday, 'cause he was born on Leap Year, same's me, and his four- 
year-old birthday came when he was way out on the ocean, comin' over 
to America from Italy, and they were all dreadful seasick; so, of 
course, they couldn't celebrate at all." 

"But weren't you going to have a party yourself, Peggy ?" asked 
Miss Mary, and then suddenly remembered that Peggy's new mother 
was giving a big party on the night of the twenty-ninth of February, 
and, of course, little Peggy must wait. 

"ISTo; I wanted to, but — but mother — " her chin quivered, but she 
went bravely on. "Mother said I must wait ; that I ought to have told 
her sooner. Miss Mary, you remember when my birthday was, didn't 
you ? Well, anyway, will five dollars be enough to have a real nice 
party ? Could you help me make a cake ? I think it will be more fun 
than having a party at home, 'cause those children need it more." 



The St. Mary's Muse. Ill 

"And they like it better, too." Miss Mary was entering into the 
pirit of the thing, as she always did. "Peggy, let's start this very 
ifternoon and get the things for the cake. You must let me supply 
he eggs and the butter and flour, and we'll buy some nuts and things, 
;o make candy, and we'll have plenty left to buy some little surprise- 
Dresents — oh, yes, and a ring and thimble and dime for the cake. How 
nany children are there in the ward ?" 

"Oh ! Miss Mary, you're a perfect angel ! There are eight children 
n the ward. I remember, 'cause I had nine roses an' I gave Pete — 
;hat's the little boy — I gave him the extra one, an' that's how we got 
quainted. Do you really not mind, Miss Mary ; do; you really not ?"' 

"Yes, I do really not mind, Peg," Miss Mary declared. "Come on, 
ive must hurry if we're going to get back before dark. Wait a second. 
There, now, I'm ready." 

Old Mrs. Smith, who lived with Miss Mary, smiled at them through 
the window as they hurried out. 

"I'll bet that Peggy child has some plan in her head, and I'm sure 

it's lovely. She's a dear child," said old Mrs. Smith, and she pulled 

the curtain aside to watch them as they passed out of sight down the 

street. 

********* 

Little Pete lay in his little bed in the big ward and looked hard at 
the big picture calendar on the opposite wall. Yes, today was his. 
birthday — his eighth birthday — the first birthday he had ever had,, 
and here he was in bed. He clenched his teeth hard as he thought of 
his old mother, too busy with supporting his brothers and sisters to 
visit him more than once a week. His mind traveled back through all 
the crowded poverty-stricken years since his last birthday on ship- 
board, four years ago, and to the land he dimly remembered as Italy. 

He thought of his big sailor father, lost for two years on the cruel 
blue sea, and of his own struggles to help support the younger brothers 
and sisters before his accident, the accident which had left him all 
crippled. He wondered what his mother was doing and whether the 
operation the doctors had performed on him would make him welL 
Already he felt stronger and he was hungry. They had let him have 
ice-cream yesterday ! 



112 The St. Mart's Muse. 



"Mr. Peter," — the nurse always called him that for fun ; they were 
great friends, he and the white-capped nurse — "some friends of yours 
here to see you." The door opened and in came the same golden- 
haired little girl who had come to see him last Sunday, and behind her 
was a lovely lady, almost as beautiful as the picture of the Madonna 
pinned on the wall in his tenement home. And then, after he'd been 
introduced to "Miss Mary," his nurse brought up a table with a pink 
flowered paper cover on it, and pink flowered paper napkins were 
given to all the little children in the ward, and pink peppermints to 
all those who could eat them, and big chocolate creams to all those who 
were strong and nearly well — all these on pink plates with pink frills 
around them, and then — Pete's eyes almost popped out of his head, 
for his nurse came in bearing aloft a large round cake with white 
icing and pink candy rose-buds and — could he believe it ? — eight pink 
candles all alight. 

Pete drew a long breath ; he hadn't ever seen a cake like that — 'cept 
in grocery windows, of course — and now that he had one all his own 
he just would like to keep it. 

"It's most too pretty to eat," he sighed, and that broke the ice. 
Soon all the children were chattering as if they were almost perfectly 
well, and then the presents were given around. Some had dolls and 
some had engines or trains or wagons — no horns or drums, because 
they weren't strong enough for too much excitement — and little fancy 
candy-boxes filled with candy to keep. Pete could not remember 
much after that ; he was too excited ; and the next thing he knew he 
woke up to find some one calling his name in a husky voice, and then 
he knew his father had come back, after two long years, when every 
one thought he was dead. And then the doctor came in and told him 
that he must rest and be quiet or he would not get well, and so he 
knew that some day he would be able to walk again. So he stayed as 
quiet as a mouse, 'cause he was too happy to talk, and soon he fell 
asleep with his hand tight clasped in the hard, rough hand of his 
father, and the light of his birthday candles beaming on his happy 

face. 

********* 

"It all happened just like a fairy story, didn't it, Miss Mary ?" said 



The St. Maky's Muse. 113 

Peggy, as they walked home in the dusk. "An' what I think was 
'most the best part of all was me getting the ring ; and that means I'll 
be married 'fore you are, Miss Mary !" 



New Year Thoughts 

The rays of the dying sun 

Sinking slowly in the west 

Bring grief to the hearts of many on earth, 

For now the old year is at rest. 

Some sigh for the things they have not done, 

While others sigh with the thought 

That the things they have done 

Will bring good to no one, 

And that all their tasks were for naught. 

The rays of the rising sun 
Paint the snow and the sky so clear 
That it bringeth joy to all the world — 
'Tis the dawn of the glad New Year! 

Some are eager for work they never have done, 
And others face without fear 
The race to be run, the goal to be won 
Through the days of this happy New Year. 

F. R. G., '16. 



True Success 



Katheeine W. Boubne, '16. 

The old minister smiled down on the handsome young face turned 
inquiringly up to his, with a pride that only grandfathers know. 

"But why did you always stay here, grandfather ? I know that you 
have done a great successful work, that every person in these moun- 
tains loves you ; but could you not have had greater success in some 
large city? I know you have had big calls; why did you not go? 
Aren't you ever sorry that you stayed ?" 

The old man gazed away into the distant blue mountains, away into 
the distant past. "Yes," he mused; "yes, I have had some calls 



114 The St. Mart's Muse. 



which other men would say were better, but I do not know, I do not 
«know. You see I was very young when I first came here. Three years 
of hard work in these mountains made me love them, love them and 
the people. Then came my first big call. I went to the city to look 
into it. The glamour of the city, the great work to be done and the 
large salary fascinated me. I thought God had called me. I told the 
city people that I would let them know in a week, and I came back to 
my mountain people before accepting. 

"When I jumped off the dusty train, thrilled with the work before 
me, and the pure joy of life (for I now felt that I could ask the girl 
I loved to marry me), she was the first person I met. Well do I re- 
member that scene. I sprang forward, holding out both hands, but 
she, without a smile, without a welcoming look, said : 'I do not know 
whether I want to shake hands with you or not. If you are going 
away, I do not. There is all the work any one man can do here.' 
And when she saw my hand drop limply to my side she threw up her 
pretty head and walked away, leaving me staring dazedly after her. 

"That night the vestry met to ask me not to leave. They told me 
they did not want the money and people that I might send from the 
city; they wanted me. Well, you know I was feeling rather badly 
then, and I did not know whether I ought to go or stay. My ambition 
said go ; my love said do that which lies near at hand. In this mood 
I left the church. The first thing I knew I bumped into somebody, 
and motherly old Mrs. Brown, holding me by the shoulders, asked me 
what was all this she heard about my leaving. 'Look here, sonny,' she 
said, 'If you want to make money, go to the city ; but if you want to 
work for the jmre glory of God, stay here. You have a big influence 
Tiere, but you can not pack it up with you as books to take to the city. 
Stay here, boy, for your real success will come perhaps not in this 
old generation, but in the lives of the new. Stay ; you will never be 
sorry.' 'I will stay,' I whispered. She kissed me on the forehead 
and then I went to ask for another. 

"That pretty girl was your grandmother, boy." His eyes rested on 
the little white church among the hills, and half to himself and half to 
the little woman waiting for him over there, he whispered, "ISTo, I was 
never sorry that I stayed." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 115 



SCHOOL NEWS 



November 22 — Mr. Stone Entertains the Seniors 

Monday afternoon, November 22, the Seniors enjoyed a delightful 
time as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stone and their daughter, Miss 
Florence Stone, '15. In high spirits they left the house, with Mr. 
Stone as chaperon, and went out to see the A. & M. dress parade. At 
4 :30 they caught the car and went around to Mr. Stone's home, where 
Mrs. Stone and Miss Florence Stone served a delicious salad course, 
tea and wafers. The rest of the afternoon was spent in a home-like 
manner around the open fire while several of the girls sang and 
played. It was just a touch of home-life that did each of the girls= 
good, and all were sorry when the time came to leave. Each one de- 
clared it was the nicest party of the year. S. E. G., '16. 

November 22 — Basketball Game 

The game between the Omicrons and the Tillcums was played No- 
vember 22. It was the closest game that has been played this season. 
The Mus would throw a goal, and not a second after the Sigmas would 
make some brilliant play, and up would go their score. At the end of 
the first half the score was 7 to 6 in favor of the Mus. After good 
playing on both sides the final score was 10 to 9 in favor of the 
Sigmas. A. C. L., '17. 

November 23 — Inter-Society Meeting 

An interesting inter-society meeting in observance of Thanksgiving- 
Day was held in the parlor on Tuesday evening, November 23, with 
Eleanor Relyea, President of Sigma Lambda, presiding. 

After the singing of "America," the general subject of "Thanks- 
giving — what we have to be thankful for as a Nation, a State, and a 
School," was treated by Alice Latham, Agnes Pratt, Dolores Holt, 
Annie Budd, and Nellie Rose. An entertaining poem was read by 
Josephine Myers and a story by Robena Carter, after which the meet- 
ing adjourned. S. E. G., '16. 



116 The St. Maky's Muse. 



NoTember 26 — The Teachers' Assembly 

The annual meeting of the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly was 
held in Raleigh November 25-27. A number of St. Mary's Alumnae 
were among the teachers in attendance, and Miss Harriet Bowen, of 
Chapel Hill, was the guest of the School for the occasion. Miss 
Martha A. Dowd, the Music Director of St. Mary's, who had been 
Secretary of the Music Teachers' Association of the Assembly the past 
year, was elected President of that Association for the coming year — a 
well-deserved recognition of her and an honor to the School. 

Dr. Lay took his Pedagogy Class to the Assembly on Friday, the 
26th, and during the morning the members of the class, in addition to 
visiting the Grammar Grade Teachers in their session, had the pleas- 
ure of exploring the beautiful new county courthouse and the Raleigh 
High School, where sections of the Assembly were meeting. The en- 
tire morning was spent in the visit and Dr. Lay was voted a delightful 
escort. 

On Friday morning Mr. Owen spoke at Meredith College to the 
Music Teachers' Association on "The Psychology of Singing," and on 
Friday night, observed as North Carolina Night, the St. Cecilia Club, 
with Mr. Owen as director, rendered a delightful musical program at 
the general session of the Assembly in the City Auditorium. 

November 26 — Thanksgiving Day 

Thanksgiving Day is always a very special day at St. Mary's, and 
this year was no exception. Under that rule of long standing that no 
one can go home for the holiday, the day becomes largely "Box Day," 
and the many "Box Parties" were as thoroughly enjoyed as usual. 

At the 11 o'clock service the Rector preached an inspiring sermon 
appropriate to the day. Thanksgiving dinner at 1 :30 was, of course, 
an event, and Miss Fenner deserved the many compliments she re- 
ceived on the menu. 

November 28 — Miss Tillinghast's Talk 

On Sunday night, November 28, Miss Rob en a Tillinghast, who is 
doing mission work among the deaf and dumb in Durham, made a 
very interesting informal talk in the parlor. Among other interesting 



The St. Mary's Muse. 117 

phases of her work she described the way in which the deaf-mutes take 
part in the church services and repeated for us the Creed and the 
Lord's Prayer in the sign language. 

Altogether the talk was very appealing and instructive, and was 
greatly enjoyed by all who heard it. 

November 29-December 5 — Preaching Mission 

The week of November 30 to December 5, the first week in Advent, 
was the time appointed by the Church for the Nation-wide Preaching 
Mission. 

We were fortunate at St. Mary's in having Rev. Milton A. Barber, 
the Rector of Christ Church, as the special preacher. The four serv- 
ices in the Chapel consisted of shortened Evening Prayer, followed by 
the address. Mr. Barber's general subject was "Self-Discipline," and 
the four addresses were on "The Discipline of the Tongue and its 
Words," "The Discipline of the Mind and its Thoughts," "The Dis- 
cipline of the Heart and its Affections," and "The Discipline of the 
Will." 

Attendance on these Chapel services was voluntary, and the large 
attendance at each of them was an evidence of how beneficial and stim- 
ulating they proved. 

We wish to thank Mr. Barber for his talks on these occasions, and 
hope he may be with us many times in the future. 

November 30 — Junior Basketball Game 

On Monday, November 30, the Mus and Sigmas met again in 
basketball, with the following line-up : 

Mu Position Sigma 

Askew (Capt.) Taylor 

Center 

Paul, L Ivey (Capt.) 

Side Center 

Northrop Jensen 

Forward 

Eourne Holt 

Forward 

Burke Mullins 

Guard 

Blodgett Bray 

Guard 



118 The St. Maky's Muse. 

The splendid passing of the Mus was especially noticeable. The 
ball was kept in constant motion, and it can be said that this was the 
most exciting game of the season to date. The final score was Mus, 6 ; 
Sigmas, 4. A. 0. L., '17. 

December 1 — Mr. Cox's Talk 

On Wednesday morning, December 1, instead of the regular chapel 
service the whole School attended a talk concerning the "Men's For- 
ward Movement," given in the school room by the Rev. W. E. Cox, of 
Wilmington. He spoke of the half of the human race to whom the 
Gospel had never been preached, of their great suffering and need and 
of the three great calls for help — social, religious, and educational. 
Having pictured the great need, he recalled our own obligation and 
spoke of what has been done in the past and of the inadequacy of the 
interest and contributions of the people. The ideal of the "Men's 
Forward Movement" is to bring every single person to take part and 
to do something to help. Mr. Cox's talk was very interesting and 
stirring, and was greatly enjoyed. 

December 4 — Captain Ball Game 

On December 4 a most exciting game of captain ball was played 
between the Sigma Midgets and the Mu Midgets. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Position Mu 

Lucy Jensen Mary S. Morgan 

Center 
Charlotte Johnson Nina Burke 

Guard 
Elizabeth Baker Lucy Lay 

Circle 
Marion Lynah Margaret Raney 

Circle 
Inez Cobb Josephine Ellington 

Circle 
Martina Carr Jane Grimes 

Circle 
Katherine Baker Mary Wilson 

Guard 
Roe Ella Robbins Elizabeth Woollcott 

Guard 



The St. Maby's Muse. 119 

The teams were pretty evenly matched. At the end of the first half 
the score was 11 to 6 in favor of the Mus. After good playing on 
both sides the final score was brought up to 36 to 25 in favor of the 

Mus. A. C. L., '17. 

December 4 — The Mikado 

When on Saturday evening, December 4, the Chorus Class, directed 
by Mr. R. Blinn Owen, gave Sir Arthur Sullivan's opera, "The 
Mikado," we witnessed the realization of something to which we had 
long been looking forward with the greatest interest and enthusiasm. 
And the reality truly surpassed the anticipation. The audience was a 
large and appreciative one, and, judging from the hearty applause, 
thoroughly enjoyed the evening. 

The acting was especially good, the characters being well inter- 
preted and a great deal of skill and talent being shown in the produc- 
tion. 

The stage was beautiful with arbors of wisteria, oceans of cherry 
blossoms, chrysanthemums and lanterns; and the chorus formed an 
effective background. Elizabeth Corbitt's and Frances Tillotson's 
charm of manner were accentuated by the splendidly dramatic quali- 
ties of Lois Pugh's acting, while the interpretation of the parts of the 
Mikado and Pooh-Bah by Edith Blodgett and Lucile Anderson was 
excellent, and Martha Wright as Ko-Ko amused and delighted the 
audience, especially in the scene with Katisha. 

The cast of characters was as follows : 

The Mikado of Japan Miss Edith Blodgett 

Nanki-Poo, his son, disguised as a wandering minstrel 

and in love with Yum Yum Miss Prances Tillotson 

Ko-Ko, Lord High Executioner of Titipu Miss Martha Wright 

Pooh-Bah, Lord High Everything Else Miss Lucile Anderson 

Pish-Tush, a Noble Lord Miss Rttby Thorn 

Yum Yum \ f Miss Elizabeth Corbitt 

Pitti-Sing I . .Three Sisters, wards of Ko-Ko. J Miss Violet Beat 
Peep-Bo ) (^ Miss Ruby Bartholomew 

Katisha, an elderly lady in love with Nanki-Poo Miss Lois Pugh 

Chorus of girls, nobles, guards, and coolies. 



120 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Chorus : 

Miss Saeah Borden Miss Margaret Marston 

Miss Helen Brigham Miss Helen Mason 

Miss Hattie A. Copeland Miss Gertrude Merrimon 

Miss Hattie R. Copeland Miss Josephine Myers 

Miss Katharine Drane Miss Clara Paul 

Miss Frances Hillman Miss Sarah Rawlings 

Miss Mary Holt Miss Jaquelin Smith 

Miss Aline Hughes Miss Carobel Stewart 

Miss Mildred Jerger Miss Josephine Thomas 

Miss Velma Jutkins Miss Elizabeth Walker 

Miss Mildred Kirtland Miss Sarah Wiley 

Miss Ellen B. Lay Miss Virginia Williams 
Miss Helen Wright 

Act I. ) 

>■ Court-yard of Ko-Ko's official residence. 
Act II. \ 

Altogether the opera was a great success. We wish to congratulate 
the Chorus Class on their splendid work, and to thank Mr. Owen for 
the pleasure he gave us. M. A. F. 

December 6 — The Second Mu- Sigma Game 

On December 6 the first teams of the Mu and Sigma met for their 
second match of the season. The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Position Mu 

Woolford (Capt.) Brigham 

Center 

Mullins Holmes 

Side Center 

Waddell Brinley 

Forward 

Cameron Walker 

Forward 

Robinson Beatty (Capt.) 

Guard 

Tucker Burke 

Guard 

The score at the end of the first half was 10 to 7 in favor of the 
Mus, and the final score was 20 to 18 in their favor. Special remark 
should be made of the good playing of the substitutes — Mullins 
(Sigma) and Burke (Mu). 

In this game there was the cleanest playing that has been shown so 



The St. Mary's Muse. 121 

far in any of the games. The ball was fumbled hardly at all. The 
second half was more exciting than the first. At the end of the first 
half the score was 10 to 7 in favor of the Mus, but in less than five 
minutes Waddell had tied the score by making a free throw and a 
neat goal from the field. A second later the ball was down on the Mu 
side and Walker and Brinley brought the Mus ahead, only to have 
the Sigmas at once tie the score again. Just as the time-keeper's 
whistle blew, one of Anne Brinley's "home-runs" slipped neatly 
through the basket, winning the game for the Mus, 20 to 18. 

A. C. L.,'17. 
December 6 — The Carolina Dramatic Club 

Monday evening, December 6, the University Dramatic Club were 
the guests of St. Mary's and presented their 1916 play, Augustus 
Thomas' "The Witching Hour," in our auditorium. The presenta- 
tion was good throughout and the audience was enthusiastic and gen- 
erous in applause. 

Mr. George Wimberly, as the comedian, was exceedingly good, 
while Mr. Charles Coggin and Mr. Bruce Webb, as leading man and 
lady, respectively, showed unusual talent in their parts. 

J. S. W., '16. 
December 9 — Dr. Lay on "Fire Protection" 

In the Thursday evening talk, on December 9, the Rector spoke 
interestingly and instructively on "Fire." He not only told us what 
to do and what not to do in case of a fire, but gave also many useful 
facts about fires in general. Among other things, we were glad to 
know that the Chief of the Raleigh Fire Department agrees with us 
in thinking that St. Mary's is one of the safest places in Raleigh. 

December 11 — "Green Stockings" 

On Saturday night, December 11, the Dramatic Club gave for its 
annual mid-year play a presentation of "Green Stockings," a comedy 
in three acts. The play was accounted a great success and was consid- 
ered by many one of the best ever seen at St. Mary's. The charming 
rooms of the Faraday home, the strikingly pretty costumes of the 
Faraday girls, and the bright soldier suit of Colonel Vavasour-Smith 



122 The St. Maky's Muse. 

&11 added to the pleasing effect of the whole. Each individual de- 
serves the highest praise for her acting. Julia Bryan, Elizabeth Cor- 
bitt, and Jane Norman, as the charming Faraday sisters ; Anne Brin- 
ley, as father Faraday; Katherine Stewart, as the retired admiral; 
Velma Jutkins, as the imperturbable butler ; Frances Geitner and Ro- 
berta McElhannon, as the two young Englishmen ; and Josephine Wil- 
son, as the Colonel Smith who would "lie for hours looking out over 
the thatched roofs," etc., were all judged "just fine." Lois Pugh, the 
accepted suitor of Phyllis and a spoiled blase young man with strug- 
gling political aspirations, well upheld her reputation as one of the 
Dramatic Club's most talented members. To Robena Carter, taking 
the part of Celia, the obliging stay-at-home older sister, who, when the 
"worm finally turned," caused so much commotion in her family and 
so much worry to dear Aunt Ida ; and to Dolores Holt, who was Aunt 
Ida, special credit must be given as the stars of the performance. In 
fact, the whole company was a credit to the well-known and well- 
tried ability of its director, Miss Davis. It is a pity that a driving 
-snow-storm should have kept many outsiders from enjoying such a 
fine performance and from appreciating the real talent and ability as 
displayed by the girls and their director. E. R., '17. 

The cast was as follows : 

Admiral Grice (Retired) Katherine Stewaet 

William Faraday Anne Brinley 

Colonel Vavasour (Colonel Smith) Josephine Wilson 

Robert Tarver Lois Pugh 

Henry Steele Frances Geitner 

James Raleigh Roberta McElhannon 

Martin Velma Jutkins 

Celia Faraday Robena Carter 

Madge (Mrs. Rockingham) Jane Norman 

Evelyn (Lady Trenchard) Elizabeth Corbitt 

Phyllis Faraday Julia Bryan 

Mrs. Chisholm Faraday (Aunt Ida) Dolores Holt 

synopsis 

Act I. Room in Mr. Faraday's House, February 11th, evening. 

Act II. Same as Act I eight months later, about 6 o'clock. 

Act III. Morning, room in Mr. Faraday's House; evening same day. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 123 

December 12 — Muse Party 

On the evening of December 12, in the Muse Room, Mr. Cruik- 
shank and the Muse Club gave one of the occasional Muse Parties to 
Mr. Owen and the girls of the Chorus Class who had taken part in 
"The Mikado," to Miss Davis and the girls of the Dramatic Club who 
had part in "Green Stockings," to Miss Barton and the leaders in the 
Athletic Associations, and to the "Honor Roll" girls. The party was 
an appreciation of the good work that had been done during the fall 
in these various branches of School activities. 

The Muse Room was dark when the guests entered at 8 :00, but over 
in the corner a little Christmas tree, aglow with tiny electric lights, 
reminded one of the season ahead. With the turning on of the lights, 
showing the net-work of bells overhead and the other decorations about 
the room, Christmas merriment reigned. 

Mr. Cruikshank made a speech of appreciation and Miss Thomas's 
talk, which followed, thrilled everybody with love for St. Mary's. 

The Muse girls served delicious refreshments and "Miss Katie" 
gave a toast to the Muse Club. 

After talking and laughing, the party broke up, wishing everybody 
a Merry Christmas and carrying with them as souvenirs pictures of 
the Mikado group, attractively tied with red ribbon. 

V. C. A., '17. 

December 13 — Elocution Department Kecital 

On the afternoon of December 13, the Private Expression pupils of 
Miss Davis gave a very attractive Christmas program in the audito- 
rium. After two readings, by Anne Brinley and Jane Norman, well 
done and greatly enjoyed, the attractive one-act play, "The Teeth of 
the Gift Horse," was given. The parts were very well taken and the 
setting was very attractive. The whole entertainment showed the 
result of excellent training and work, and Miss Davis and the girls 
deserved and received the appreciation of the School for the pleasure 
given on this occasion. 



124 The St. Mary's Muse. 



December 16 — Christmas Entertainment 

Who could ever begin to tell of all the wonders and excitements and 
surprises of that wonderful "last night" ! There had been such a 
hurrying and scurrying and racing to and fro all day that you would 
suppose that everybody would be prepared for something unusual ; but 
nobody dreamed how very unusual it was going to be. 

The festivities had begun at dinner with the big Christmas bells 
hanging from the lights and the tiny Christmas trees sparkling on 
each table, and the fried oysters. It was at the end of this gay meal 
that Dr. Lay arose and, mid the expectant hush, announced that the 
Faculty invited the student body to an entertainment in the audito- 
rium, to take place at 8 :00 o'clock. Two seconds of breathless silence 
and then such talking ! A faculty entertainment ? Impossible ! They 
had not heard of it. It could not have been kept so quiet ! But so it 
seemed, for questioning look was answered by questioning look, and 
amazement met amazement on each face. 

The "mail line" was almost noisy that night and the scant half hour 
of study hall was held to be but a trivial thing in view of the glories 
that were to follow. 

Alice in Wonderland 

It was an eager and excited crowd that gathered in the auditorium, 
and, although the programs may not have meant much to the new 
girls, for those who have been at St. Mary's long enough to become 
familiar with its traditions, the magic words, "Alice in Wonderland," 
contained volumes of meaning. 

All those who have seen it need no description and to those who have 
not, description would be inadequate. Sufficient to say that it was all 
that tradition led us to expect, and the laughter and merriment of the 
audience vouched for its success. 

Miss Frances Bottum made a perfect "Alice," and the "Mad Tea 
Party" was especially enjoyed. The antics of Miss Roberts as the 
March Hare, Miss Lil Fenner as the Dormouse, and Mr. Owen as the 
Hatter, caused great amusement, while the dance of the Gryphon 
(Miss Shields) and the Mock Turtle (Miss Clara Fenner) fairly 
brought the house down. One of the greatest favorites was the agile 



The St. Mary's Muse. 125 

little White Rabbit, that turned out to be no other than Miss Thomas 
herself ! 

Altogether the whole play was simply wonderful. We wish to 
thank the faculty again and again for the pleasure and enjoyment 
they afforded us. 

The Christmas Tree 

But wonders were not to cease with the falling of the curtain on 
Wonderland, for there was the Christmas tree still remaining, and 
such a sight as it was in the midst of the Gymnasium, which was made 
beautiful with Christmas greens, sparkling with tinsel, shimmering 
with candles and surrounded by gifts and candies ! The carol singing 
was lovely, the girls being dressed in white and carrying candles. 
Anne Brinley made a splendid Santa Claus and the "knocks" afforded 
great laughter and merriment. Every one had a lovely time and all 
were very reluctant to go, but finally, after the singing of some Christ- 
mas hymns, in which every one joined, the crowd began slowly to dis- 
perse and the girls scattered with many wishes for a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. A. S. C, '16. 






The St. Mary's Muse 

Subscription Price - . • - - One Dollar. 

Single Copies - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hott Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberly Bourne, '16 \ t,,, ■ == *«■„„„„„„ 

Fannie Marie Stallings, '16 J Buslne83 Managers 



EDITORIAL 



January, 1916 ! My, how every Senior's heart thrills at that sight ! 
The very first time that their year is to find its place in the calendar. 
It is very hard to realize that the session of 1915-16 is almost half 
over ; but it is, and from this "middle ground" we can look back over 
what we've done and think of what we're going to do. We all agree 
that it's been a lovely year so far ; and now it's up to us to make the 
second half just as good as — yes, better than — the first. 

Of course, it's an old, time-honored custom to make "good resolu- 
tions" on New Year's Day, and, no doubt, we all do it. Whether we 
keep them or not is quite another matter. ISTow, this year let's manage 
it differently. Let's don't merely resolve so much : let's do. Resolving 
is such a vague kind of thing, and it has the bad effect of making us 
think we have accomplished something wonderful when we haven't 
really done anything at all. 

For instance, don't let's resolve in a vague kind of way to "uphold 
athletics." That sounds very fine, but we all know the thing that 
really helps is not merely resolving ; it's going out and playing as hard 
as you can when it's your turn to play, and cheering on the others 
when it isn't. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 127 

In the same way it sounds beautiful to resolve to "pay up all my 
dues." But it isn't the "resolve" that fills the treasury. It's the quar- 
ter that we'd doubtless much rather pay for chicken salad. 

So let's try and "do" all we can to help, and be on the alert to make 
this new half of the session even better than the first. We are sure 
that we can, if we try. So let's say, "Hurrah for 1916 ! and a Happy 
[New Year to each and every one!" 



ATHLETICS 



Axice Cohn Latham, '17. 

Owing to the unfailing energy of our coach, Miss Barton, and the 
unflagging enthusiasm of every one, not only players but spectators, 
athletics this fall have been a great success, as we predicted at the be- 
ginning of the year. 

The following program was carried out : 

Oct. 25. Track meet, won by Sigma. 

Oct. 25-Nov. 29. Tennis Tournament, won by Mu. 

Nov. 1. Basketball, first teams, won by Sigma. 

Nov. 8. Basketball, junior teams, won by Mu. 

Nov. 22. Basketball, junior teams, won by Sigma. 

Nov. 29. Basketball, junior teams, won by Mu. 

Nov. 29. Tennis finals, won by Mu. 

Dec. 4. Captain ball, midgets, won by Mu. 

Dec. 6. Basketball, first teams, won by Mu. 

As is seen, the Sigmas won the Track Meet, but the Mus made a 
clean sweep in Tennis, and the score of points in Basketball is 9 to 6 
in favor of the Mu. 

The program for January is : 

Jan. 10. Basketball, junior teams. 
Jan. 15. Captain ball, midget teams. 
Jan. 17. Volley ball, first teams. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumna? Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs - L McK - pittin S er . Raleigh. 

I- Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - - - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 
Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



Misses Harriet and Josephine Bowen, in Raleigh for the Teachers' 
Assembly, were guests of the School the last of November. Miss Har- 
riet Bowen, after having had charge of the Girls' Canning Club work 
in Orange County, at Chapel Hill, the past summer, is again teaching 
in the Chapel Hill schools. Miss Josephine Bowen has a private 
music class at Lincolnton, where she has been for a number of years, 
having taught at Fassifern before Miss Shipp moved her school to 
Hendersonville. 

Another valued visitor at the Assembly was Miss Chelian H. Pix- 
ley, for the past eight years Director of Music at Fassifern, Hender- 
sonville. Miss Pixley was called from St. Mary's to Fassifern when 
Miss Shipp established the school, after having been a member of the 
St. Mary's Music Faculty for a number of years. She is associated in 
the minds of St. Mary's folks with her aunt, Miss Emergene Schutt, 
who taught Piano here and was one of her teachers, and who since 
leaving St. Mary's has been a teacher of Piano at Winthrop College, 
and with Miss Charlotte Hull, teacher of Violin here, who has been 
for some years Professor of Violin at Sweetbriar College. 

It has been a decided pleasure of late to welcome back several of 
last year's class for only too brief visits. Helen Peoples was here for 
"The Birth of a Nation," Elizabeth Carrison came up for the Dra- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 129 

matic Club play, in which she has been starring for several years back, 
Anniebelle King, Sadie Vinson, and Mattie Moye Adams have all 
dropped in on their travels "between visits." 



With the Class of 1914 



Laura P. Clark, '14. 

There is not much news to tell now, but we are looking for many in- 
teresting accounts after the Christmas holidays. However, we have 
j been able to gain some news from the three from whom we heard noth- 
ing last time. Hoppe has been fortunate in being able to say she has 
spent most of her time since Commencement taking lovely trips. Her 
latest has been one which lasted five weeks and which took in Canada 
to Vancouver, from where she came south through San Francisco, San 
Diego, etc., to Mexico', and then home through Colorado. 

Grace Crews, who has been in training as a nurse since July, 1914, 
has been at the Episcopal Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital since the 
last summer, but expected to go on the 28th of December back to the 
Children's Hospital. Both of these hospitals are in Washington, D. C. 

Melba McCullers spent the summer at ISTarragansett Pier, coming 
home in October, where she is spending the winter. 



130 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ALUMNAE MARRIAGES 



BRINE-WAUGH. On Wednesday, November 24, at Vancouver, B. C, Miss 
Anna Mathews Waugh, formerly of Buena Vista, Va., and Mr. Harry Fred- 
erick Brine. 

WALKER-CLEATON. On Saturday, November 27, at Portsmouth, Va., Miss 
Carrie Cleaton and Mr. Russell Walker, both of Portsmouth. 

CHALMERS-SEAMON. On Monday, December 6, at Washington, D. C, 
Miss Isabelle Gordon Seamon, formerly of Chihuahua, Mexico, and Dr. Henry 
Coleman Chalmers. At home, Red House, Charlotte County, Va. 

CLEMENTS-DAVIS. On Wednesday, December 8, at Henderson, N. C, Miss 
Eleanor Florence Davis and Mr. Richard Erskine Clements, both of Hender- 
son, N. C. 

BOWERS-HILL. On Monday, December 20, at Lexington, N. C, Miss Louise 
Hill and Mr. John C. Bower, both of Lexington. 

GATTIS-HOLLOWAY. On Saturday, December 25, at Enfield, N. C, Miss 
Sarah Vernon Holloway and Mr. Elmo Heathcliff Gattis, both of Enfield. 

LONG-DURKEE. On Wednesday, December 29, at Griflm, Ga., Miss Eflie 
Louise Durkee and Mr. Alexander Campbell Long, Jr. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 




Miss D. 
end of 'he 

S. M. (point. ng to a copy of the Mona Lisa). — "Say, who pinned 
donna up over my bed?" 



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Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
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'It's worth the difference" 



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"Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



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j Exclusive 

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THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

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Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
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THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 




\rafs is very confidential, Dorothy." 
"Yes, love; I shall be very careful to whom I tell it." — Ex. 



Why Is 

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the 

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Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
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Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 

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i 

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1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

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S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 




/Jie]*oo1ei£L/£f)hop a 




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Mr. C. (despairingly). — "Some of us never do." 



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HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Lafayette 



A Cafe which invites the patronagre of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
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Advertisements 


HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOEE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

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Phone 123 

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All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


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RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 


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REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

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Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



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Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



**& \?^i^f^~ -:•.•£': *S"*_ SSI 

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Fire Insurance and Investments 



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Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, O. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Adveetisements 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-W 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrirc 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 


Calnmet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSF 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayettevllle St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Payetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH. N C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures; 
Frames, Novelties 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cabdwell & O'Kelly, Pbopeietoes 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIAL' 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



When the donkey saw the zebra 

He began to wag his tail. 
"Well, I never!" said the donkey, 
"There's a mule that's been in jail." — Ex. 



Norfolk Southern Railroac 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va, 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. < 



.-..■*• 







fcaleigf), JEL C. 




4flti»4Kamter dumber 

Jf efcruw?, 1916 



SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1916 



St. Mary's 



February 5— -Inter-Class Parties. 8 :00-9 :00 p. m. 

Sophomore-Senior — Muse Room. 

Freshman- Junior — Parlor. 
February 12— Valentine Party. Parlor. 8 :00-9 :00. 
February 19— Colonial Ball. Parlor. 8:00-9:00. 
February 26— Parlor Entertainment. 8:00-9:00. 
March 4— University of North Carolina Glee Club. 

Auditorium. 8 :15 p. m. 
March 8— Ash Wednesday. Holy Day. 
March 20 — First Inter-Society Debate. 

Alpha Eho-Sigma Lambda. 8 :00. 
March 27 — Second Inter-Society Debate, 

Alpha Rho-Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
April 3 — Third Inter-Society Debate. 

Sigma Lambda-Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
April 9— Passion Sunday. Bishop's Annual Visitation. 
April 21 — Good Friday. Holy Day. 
April 23— -Easter Day. 

April 24— Easter Monday. Easter Egg Hunt. 7 :00 p. m. 
April 29 — "Junior-Senior Banquet." Muse Room. 8:15 p.m. 
May 6— Fifth Annual "School Party." Parlor. 8 :15 p, m. 
May 12 — Alumnae Day. 74th Anniversary of the opening of St. 

Mary's. 
May 13 — Annual Chorus Recital. 
May. 16-18 — Senior Examinations. 
May 18-20 — Final Examinations. 
May 20-22 — Commencement Season. 



5 :00 p. m. 



EDWARDS a BROUGHTON PRIHT1NS CO.. RALEIOH. N. C 



I The St. Mary's Muse 

MID-WINTER NUMBER 

Vol. XX. February, 1916. No. 5 

The Call 



Annie S. Cameron. 

A call to me comes in the evening wind 

From mountain and hill and plain, 

'Neath the tinted skies 

Where the red sun dies, 

And the stars creep forth again. 

Down through the ages of by-gone days 
Unto the years to be, 
It is ringing still 
Over vale, and hill, 
Over the world to me. 

And my heart leaps up with an answering cry 
Born of this call of old, 
And with wild desire 
My heart is on fire, 
Under the skies of gold. 

Oh! for a voice to carry it on, 

To send it forth again, 

In words of flame 

This message that came, 

Over the world to men. 

To see and be silent! Hear and be dumb! 
Barren of words and weak! 
Yet to know and to feel 
Life's throbbing appeal — 
Ah, but for a voice to speak! 



132 The St. Maky's Muse. 



A Fancy 



(Suggested by Keats's Poems.) 
Doloees Holt. 

The moonlight flooded the glen and lit the dark waters of the 
brook as it made its way — now laughing and gurgling, now sighing 
and dreaming — on and on to the broad deep river beyond. The 
stars smiled down and the winds caressed the cheeks of the tall 
young man, who stood spellbound before the beauty of the night. 
He breathed in the pure air, threw out his arms, and laughed softly 
with the pure joy of living. At this moment, like the spirit of night, I 
an exquisite Grecian-clad Naiad stepped from the shadow of a giant 
pine and danced, lightly, joyously, and with the utmost abandon, 
across the glen to the very banks of the brook where she stood laugh- 
ing a moment at her reflection in the moonlit waters. Keats caught 
his breath. "Is it only a wonderful dream?" he half sighed. No, 
surely he was awake. But who could this beautiful creature be who 
danced to the song of the brook, interpreting so perfectly the beauty, 
the joy, the weirdness of the night? 

Softly he crept nearer and nearer until she saw him and, poised 
half in the air, beckoned him to her. "I am the soul of Beauty, Joy, 
and the Night," she said, and her wonderful eyes rested for a moment 
on his. Keats felt himself sinking to the ground, but instantly her 
arms bore him up, and the exquisite voice continued : "Thou wor- 
shiper of Beauty, behold in me her very soul ! I appear to< thee, 
for thou art the only one of my worshipers who is noble and pure 
enough to see me, but the penalty, best beloved, is death ! Thou hast 
reached thy goal and hast beheld the spirit that dwells in all things 
beautiful and joyful and now shall I claim thee for my own! 
Come, my Adonais and dance with me, for tonight will I unravel all 
the mysteries of Beauty, Joy and Truth to thee and then my young, 
my beautiful Adonais, shalt thou fade, droop and die. Fear not 
death, best beloved, for thou shalt dwell forever with me, the Spirit 
whom thou hast worshiped and loved so long." The musical voice 
ceased and the young poet floated away with the spirit to the world 



The St. Maey's Muse. 133 



f mystery. What the soul of Beauty, Joy and the Night imparted 
> him, no mortal has ever known for the secret was locked in his 

©art. 

****** * * * 

Day by day the poet seemed to fade, like a proud lily that after 
;s brief reign on earth droops its proud head and dies — but only 
) awaken to its everlasting reign in the land of immortal flowers. 
lo Keats bowed his head and half sadly, half joyfully, gave up his 
lmost fulfilled place among the first of English poets. 

It was on a beautiful moonlight night six months after the spirit 
ad first appeared to the young poet that she again came. Keats 
m dreaming, his pale face calm and still against the pillow, when 
uddenly he was awakened by the sound of soft music. With a cry 
£ joy the dying poet stretched his arms toward the vision. She 
imiled down at him, "Come, long sought" she cried. 

In a moment all was dark and still in the room, the moon had gone 
lehind a cloud and the soul of Keats was once more a portion of the 
oveliness he had made yet more lovely. 



The Successful Doctor 



Elizabeth Corbitt. 

She was only twenty-one but she told herself that she was truly 
i hundred ! She was tired and weary and her head was throbbing 
vith all the jarring and grinding of the train. Her brain just would 
lot stop working ; it insisted on reviewing again and again her whole 
last life. She had a great horror for it all. She had never been 
lappy for there was always a! burden too heavy to bear. She had 
>een to college two years ; but she had been called home at her 
nother's death to take charge of things. After that, "I swallowed 
;oo much dust, I guess, for the doctor said I had germs," she 
groaned. She had been ill some time before the doctors could dis- 
sever that she must go west. Then followed the wretched, almost 
jnded journey over the continent. Oh! would the train never stop! 



134 The St. Mary's Muse. 



If 

At last, morning came and the train stopped with a jolt, and t 
journey was over. 

Out in Colorado the Big Doctor had built his hospital. T | 
doctor — big, gruff but tender hearted — was working out a cure f 
a dreadful disease, and his patients were those which had been giv 
up as almost hopeless by other sanitariums in the West. He h; 
been very successful ; but, on losing a recent case he had lost all fait 
Suddenly his life seemed empty and not worth while. He was abo 
to give up. He needed something to restore his faith in God ai|cs 
mankind. This Big Doctor was after all only a Big Discouragi 
Boy, hungry for a woman's love and care — though he never, nev 
dreamed that was his need. On some days his sense of failure w; 
by far keener than at other times. It was on one such gloomy dc 
that feeling that only work would help him, he rushed in his autom 
bile to the hospital. 

Through the halls the white robed nurses were passing silent, 
and swiftly. The worst case yet received had just arrived. Tl 
doctors sadly looked at the pitiful little girl, her white face, with i 
pathetic eyes, her head covered by bright curls, and turned awa 
almost in tears. They felt as if they could do nothing and thei 
consultation was ending with anxious headshakings, when they sa^ 
a huge car drive up with the Big Doctor in it. 

"Yes, I've come for the most hopeless case. I want to do some 
thing big right now ! Where is he ?" he said. 

They led him into the little room of the girl patient from the Easl 

"Here is the worst case," the physician said, "but it happens t 
be a lady." 

The doctor frowned, for he had never treated women. Then, whei 
he saw her, his heart leaped with joy. Here was the girl, th< 
Littlest Lady who had been haunting him; and who was to fill th< 
big empty place in his heart ! He would save her or die ! 

First came weeks of illness. Then the Littlest Lady got strong 
enough to let a little spark of life creep into her eyes. One da} 
they opened wide to see what was happening. Everything seemea 
dead ; no one seemed to care whether she lived or died. Yes ! She 
was looking into the eyes of the Big Doctor. She looked at him 



1 



The St. Mary's Muse. 135 



d gave a glad little sigh and turned over to dream of this wonder- 
L man who was performing a miracle just for her. She was, 
High, not the only dreamer. The Big Doctor knew that life had 

[jst begun for him as well. 

\\A month later they were riding and it was twilight. She was 

;»11 again and bubbling over with laughter, chatting like a school 

trl. Then came a moment of seriousness. 

I; "You see I want to do something good and make others happy, 

i! you have made me. I want to stay in your hospital and be a 
irse. I could do good if I tried, don't you think ?" 

: "Do you really want to do one good deed, little girl ?" he asked. 
She hesitated and then said, "Yes." 

1 "Well, lean over here, my Littlest Lady." 



Cupid's Dart 



Frances Geitner. 

A song is in the air, 
The very skies are fair, 

Where bides "Dan." 
All sadness flees the heart 
When pierced by the dart 

Of his clan. 

Yes, it's useless to withstand 
An arrow from the hand 

Of Dan Cupid; 
So you might as well admit 
That your heart is sorely hit, 

Else you're stupid. 

Is he, then, a warrior brave 
Or, in truth, a common knave? 

That's the question. 
That his darts don't always hit- 
Oh, that isn't true one bit; 

Mere suggestion. 



136 The St. Mary's Muse. 



So your smiles to frowns must change — 
And be sure you're out of range 

Of his dart, 
Else he'll draw it from his quiver, 
And, alas, it soon shall shiver 

Through your heart! 



Trje Schoolroom ClocK Gives His Views on Strides 
and Strikers 



Laura Beatty. 

"I believe," said the clock in the schoolroom to himself, "that 
have the best place in the whole School to observe the girls. I se< 
them in the morning and afternoon, during school and again a 
night in Study Hall. They are very interesting, which I never ex 
pected them to be, when I was bought for a girls' boarding school 
Why! I just love it here, although some of the girls do not. 

"There goes the Study Hall bell. I like this time for I can stud} 
the girls while they study their lessons. There's that little girl with 
the light hair and old fashioned ways. She is always the first one 
here; I believe she is afraid she will get left sometime. I thought 
she never did anything wrong, but I heard the English teacher tell 
her this morning that she knew better than to talk after the bell had 
rung. 

"I do wish that girl with the black hair and eyes would keep 
still. She is forever turning around and talking to the girl behind 
her. I reckon she likes to turn around because she sits on the front 
seat and can't see anyone. I belive the girl behind her with the light 
hair was just reported. Well, no wonder, because she is forever 
talking about Eavie. She seems to be quite crazy about her, but I 
think Ravie is an awfully queer name for a girl, don't you ? 

"Why on earth doesn't that girl take her seat ? She is always 
jumping up and down after everyone else is quiet. I believe she 
does it on purpose because she knows it gives me a headache. 

"Whew! I agree with Hattie, it certainly is stuffv in here, I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 137 



*■ 



guess you wonder how I came to know her name. Well, I couldn't 
very well help it with that girl in the second row yelling it at the 
top of her lungs the minute the bell rings. Oh ! I know lots about 
the girls ; I've learned more names. There's Katherine and Mar- 
garet and Elizabeth. Speaking of Elizabeth I always thought she 
was very constant until I heard the girls talking about her the other 
day. It seems that she has a desperate strike on a girl named 
Plelen. The girls all said she was fickle, and at first I believed they 
were old gossips, but what do you think I saw with my own eyes 
the other day ? Well, I saw Elizabeth run up to Helen and give 
her a note. Her face was the color of the middy tie she wore. 

"I have been thinking lately, and I have decided that maybe I 
have a strike too, but when I see her my face doesn't turn the color 
that Elizabeth's does, so I am not quite sure. However, I have one 
' symptom that generally indicates a strike. That is, my heart begins 
1 to beat awfully fast, and it is all I can do to keep from running 
'< faster. The girl's wouldn't mind that, but I am afraid that if I 
began to run fast, the principal would say I was out of order and 
take me away. Just think ! Then I wouldn't see my strike any 
more! Oh, that reminds me, I have never described her to you. 
Well, she is not too tall and is slender. Her hair is a beautiful 
reddish brown, and her eyes are large and gray. They are beautiful 
eyes, so much expression in them. To make a long description short 
she is beautiful in every respect. I have never seen the girl yet that 
could surpass her. There is one thing though — she is not particu- 
larly crazy about studying, though I don't know that I should call 
that a fault. I do detest a bookworm. I never was quite sure 
whether I had a strike on her or not. Oh, no, I am not going to 
tell you her name. You can guess that for yourself. Why if I did 
you'd tease both of us nearly to death. One day, when there was 
only about one second more of Study Hall, she seemed to be weary 
and turning around in her seat, she looked me square in the face, 
and then I must confess I struck. 



138 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Trje Erjd of a Day at St. Mary's 



Julia Bryan. 

Nine-thirty ! St. Mary's is wrapped in a studious quiet when 
suddenly a stacatto ringing of electric bells announces study over. 
A slight murmur heard below stairs increases to a chorus of laughter 
and chatter as one hundred and fifty girls surge up the steps. 
Messages are called back and forth and doors close temporarily while 
kimonos and boudoir caps are donned. 

The murmur, which has been momentarily subdued, gradually 
increases as doors are heard to swing open and the young people trip 
into the halls. They flit by in twos and threes on their way to a 
feast, perhaps, or if nothing better affords itself, even to an humble 
box of candy. 

Now they are gathered in little chatting knots. Glimpses into 
various rooms show them sitting tailor fashion on the beds and 
always laughing — always bubbling with the spirit of untroubled 
youth. Quite a gay company they are as they chatter and "have 
fun." In the hall where a piano sounds merrily the latest ragtime 
"hit," couples dance and spectators occupy convenient trunks. 

When the merriment is at its height the lights flash three times. 
Five minutes to get into curl papers and scurry into bed. Such a 
chatter as fills the buildings. Pink, blue, green, lavender — all colors 
flash by the doors. Sounds of laughter, giggles and shrieks are 
heard. Last flash ! A final chorus of goodnight messages. Doors 
slam, lights flash off and the air is filled with a noise like a covey 
of birds settling to rest. All the buildings are in darkness. Some- 
where a door slams. Perhaps whispers are exchanged for a few min- 
utes — then absolute quiet. 

Outside the moon looks down on a majestic old grove with its 
group of buildings all dark and quiet, looking like a little city resting. 
St. Mary's is asleep. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 139 



SCHOOL NEWS 



January 14 — "Miss Katie's" Birthday 

On Friday afternoon, January 14th, Miss Elizabeth Lay, in the 
absence of her mother who was still in New Hampshire, acted as 
hostess at the Rectory to a small party of Miss Katie's Faculty 
friends in honor of her birthday. 

Though the absence of Mrs. Lay was deeply regretted the party 
was a charming affair. The refreshments consisted of Lady Balti- 
more cake, chocolate with whipped cream, cakes and candy, all made 
by the young hostess, were greatly enjoyed. 

Miss Katie cut the cake which was brightly lighted with the cor- 
rect number of candles for the years and the extra one on which 
to grow in the hearts of all of us and continue her useful work here 
at St. Mary's. 

January 17 — Miss Katherine Smith's Tea 

On Monday afternoon, January 17th, a number of St. Mary's girls 
had the pleasure of attending a large tea given by Miss Katherine 
Clark Smith, last year of St. Mary's, given at her home on Wil- 
mington street in honor of Miss Elizabeth Gold, of Wilson, Miss 
Jean Smith, of Baltimore, both former St. Mary's girls, and two 
other guests. 

Among those invited from St. Mary's were Katherine Stewart, 
Charlotte Howard, Nettie Daniels, Sarah Borden, Jacque Smith, 
Elizabeth Corbitt, the two Hattie Copelands, Gertrude Merrimon 
and Margaret Gold. 

January 19 — Lee's Birthday 

On Wednesday, January 19th, the usual Inter-society Meeting 
was held in honor of Lee's Birthday. The meeting was held in 
the parlor at the Lunch Period, and after the singing of "Tenting 
Tonight" Dr. Lay made a short, interesting talk on General Lee's 
character, pointing out the high ideal that his life had set for each 
and all. The meeting closed with the singing of "Dixie." 



140 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Jannary 22 — Rev. Mr. Phillips's Address 

On Thursday morning, January 20th, a short address was made 
in the chapel by the Rev. Henry Phillips, Chaplain of the University 
of the South, Sewanee. Dr. Phillips who was formerly in charge 
of the well known Mill Work La Grange, Ga., was in Raleigh for 
the Conference of Mill Workers, which was held at Christ Church, 
January 18-20. 

Dr. Phillips impressed the point that the way to accomplish the 
big things in life is to begin with the little duties that lie nearest 
us, to begin with the "small, near end of things." He assured his 
hearers that every big thing has a, little end and that this little end 
is often the most important part of the whole. The address was 
very interesting and helpful, and we hope to hear Dr. Phillips again. 

January 22 — Dr. Brewster's Talk 

Another of those in Raleigh for the Conference of Mill Workers 
was Dr. Mary Brewster, who has charge of the hospital in connection 
with the Training School at La Grange. She was with us for the 
"Thursday Talk" on the 22d, and spoke of the great work that is 
being done among the mill people and of the training given kinder- 
garten teachers and nurses at the Settlement. She described many 
interesting phases of the work and urged upon us the need for trained 
women and girls. The talk was full of interest and was greatly 
enjoyed. 

January 24 — Basketball Game 

On Monday, January 24th, the first basketball game of the new 
term was played in the Gymnasium between the Junior teams of 
Sigma and Mu. A good number of girls gathered to watch the game 
and their cheers were very enthusiastic. There was some very good 
playing on both sides and the two forwards, Mary Hoke and Lillias 
Shepherd, distinguished themselves. The final score was 20 to 1 15 
in favor of the Mus. 

January 29 — "Statistics" 

On Saturday night, January 29th, great excitement was caused 
by the taking of "statistics." The whole procedure had been kept 
so quiet that the news came as a. great surprise, and very exciting 



The St. Mary's Muse. 141 

indeed was the scene in the School Room. The first returns were read 
at nine o'clock and the necessary second ballots were then taken. 
The final list as posted next morning was as follows : 

Statistics, 1915-1916. 

Most Popular Annabelle Converse 

Most Influential Mary Floyd 

Best Dancer Margaret Jones 

Most Athletic Annie Brinley 

Most Fascinating Sarah Rawlings 

Prettiest i Katharine Drane 

Handsomest Louise Arbogast 

Best All-round Alvie Latham 

Best Student Annie Cameron 

Most Musical Sarah Rawlings 

Neatest Helen Brigham 

Most Wide-awake Alvie Latham 

Most Courteous Frances Geitner 

Most Practical Fannie Stallings 

Cutest Annabelle Converse 

Most Optimistic Frances Tillotson 

Most Ambitious Annie Cameron 

Most Sentimental Ruby Bartholomew 

Most Lovable Frances Cheatham 

Most Enthusiastic Nancy Woolford 

January 31— The "Fuller Sisters'" Concert 

On the evening of Monday, the 31st, the third of the Peace-St. 
Mary's Concerts of 1915-16, was given in the St. Mary's Auditorium. 
The artists were the widely known Misses Fuller in a program of 
old English Folk Songs. The unique concert was a delight to all. 
The Auditorium was full and the audience thoroughly appreciative. 

The Ealeigh Times said of the concert: 

The Fuller sisters were like a fresh breath from Old England itself as they 
swept on the stage at St. Mary's auditorium Monday night. In their quaint 
costumes of brocaded silk, with billowing hoopskirts, tight-fitting basques, and 
hair drawn low over the ears, they presented a charming picture. There was 
stately Miss Dorothy, more or less dignified; charming Miss Rosalind, all 
freshness and life temperament, and sweet; dainty Miss Cynthia, her Irish 
harp, from which she drew beautiful strains of music as accompaniment to the 
songs the sisters sang. 

The program was made up of English and Scottish folk songs, most of which 
have been rescued by the Fuller sisters from many of the hidden corners of 



142 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Old England, and they sang them with a freshness and charm that was de- 
lightful to listen to. The very untrained quality and natural sweetness of 
their voices fitted the old folk ballads and children's action songs perfectly. 
Coming from Dorset, England, they sang many of the old songs and entered 
into a number of the singing games that they had loved in their old home. 
The audience was captured more and more by the charm of them, and they 
responded with a number of encores, an especially clever one being a barn- 
yard imitation. 

The songs were grouped into children's action songs, songs of battles long 
ago, romances, songs of happy lovers, songs of home and country, and the 
singer's farewell. 

The entertainment was one of the Peace-St. Mary's concert series, and was 
one of the most charming and unique concerts that has been given in the 
city. Its delightful freshness will not soon be forgotten by those who heard 
the old songs. 

February 1 — Captain Ball Game 

On February 1st there was a very interesting game of Captain Ball 
in the gymnasium between the Sigma, and the Mu Midgets. The 
score at the end of the first half was 14 to 1 in favor of the Mus. 
But in the second half the Sigmas proved their metal and brought 
their score up to 14 points, making the score at the end of the second 
half 17-15 still in favor of the Mus. The chief feature of the game 
was the good playing of Mary Wilson for the Mus and that of Boella 
Bobbins for the Sigmas. 

N. P. W. 
February 5 — The Inter-class Parties 

The Sophomokes to the Seniors. 

The Sophomore Party to the Seniors in the Muse Boom on the 
evening of February 5th was a great success. Katharine Drane, 
the Sophomore President, welcomed the guests at the door and pre- 
sented each with a Valentine place-card. The room was tastefully 
decorated in red hearts, including a 1916 design of them on the 
wall. The game also was Hearts, and it was much enjoyed. Mary 
Floyd, the Senior President, received the souvenir of the evening, 
a box of candy hearts. After the serving of delicious refreshments 
the guests departed, feeling that the Sophomores were delightful 
hostesses. In addition to the Seniors a number of the Faculty were 
also present as guests of the Class. 

K. W. B. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 143 

The Freshmen to the Juniors. 

On February 5th, the Freshmen gave a party to their sister class, 
the Juniors. The invitations, written on children's paper, warned 
the guests that they were to come clad as little girls or boys. And 
such an array of infants there was ! Some were attended by faithful 
nurses who kept their naughty fingers out of mischief, some came 
in groups, and some little ladies were escorted about by little gentle- 
men. 

Though at first the children were a little bashful the ice was soon 
broken. Some one suggested games, and then there was a clamor. 
First they attempted "Little Sallie Waters," but so few knew that 
they had to resort to "Farmer in the Dell," which soon proved to be 
very popular. Again and again they went through with it. The 
monotony was broken by "London Bridge is Burning Down," but 
they soon returned to "The Farmer in the Dell." 

Shortly after nine o'clock several Freshmen disappeared, and soon 
the refreshments were served. They consisted of ice cream, lady 
fingers and old-fashioned stick candy. Every one found them delici- 
ous, especially after the strenuous games. 

The remainder of the evening was spent in general conversation 
and dancing. At nine-thirty, the tired but happy guests and hostesses 
departed, all declaring they had had "a perfectly gorgeous time." 

D. H. 
February 12 — Valentine Party to the School 

St. Valentine's day was celebrated at St. Mary's on Saturday 
night, February 12th, by a delightful party given to the School under 
the asupices of the Senior Class, The Muse Boom was gay with 
hearts and Valentine decorations ; the victrola made the music ; and 
in the room delicious sandwishes, cakes, candy and ice cream were 
sold. In the adjoining hall games were played at several tables. 
The most popular game of the evening proved to be the archery con- 
test. A tiny heart on a big one was the bull's eye, and the prize 
for hitting this with the arrow was a box of candy. Many were 
fascinated by the shooting and showed varied degrees of skill. Miss 
Thomas finally won the box of candy. 

All the guests proclaimed the party a great success and a most 
delightful and enjoyable one. E. B. 



144 The St. Mary's Muse. 

February 14 — Volley Ball Game 

The first game of Volley Ball between the Sigmas and the Mus 
was played Monday afternoon, February 14th, in the Gym. The 
game was very exciting and very interesting. The good playing of 
Mary Mullins (Sigma) and Anne Brinley (Mil) was especially no- 
ticed. At the end of the first half the score was 11 to 5 in favor of 
the Mus, and at the end of the second half the score was still in 
favor of the Mus, being 19-14. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Waddell (captain) Holmes (captain) 

Mullins Brinley 

Robinson Dodd 

Woolford Lay 

Converse Paul, C. 

Yates Burke 

Hughes Collins (first half) 

Latham (second half) 

February 14 — Miss Thomas's Valentine Party 

Miss Thomas delightfully entertained the Faculty at a Valentine 
Party on Monday afternoon, February 14th. The guests were re- 
ceived from four-thirty to six, and were welcomed at the door by 
Miss Thomas, Miss Sutton and Mile. Rudnicka. The room was taste- 
fully decorated to suit the occasion. Hearts and arrows were on the 
wall, and the red shaded lights with many candles shed a warm 
glow throughout the room. Violets and other flowers were effectively 
arranged in various places. At a side table Miss Katie served the 
coffee, while other delicious refreshments of creamed chicken, grape- 
fruit salad and mints were served by Fannie Stallings and Katharine 
Bourne of the Senior Class. The whole evening was thoroughly 
enjoyed by all who attended, for Miss Thomas, as always, proved 
a. most delightful and gracious hostess. K. W. B. 

February 14 — The Cotillion Club Dance 

The Cotillion Club, the youngest of the student social organiza- 
tions, composed of the dancing girls who "lead," gave its first cotillion 
in the Parlor on the afternoon of St. Valentine's Day. Attractive 



The St. Mary's Muse. 145 

white cards trimmed with red were arranged for twenty dances, 
and all were thoroughly enjoyed. Katharine Drane was at the piano 
and Nina Burke and Margaret Springs served punch. 
The members and their guests were as follows : 

Estelle Ravenel and "Miss" Flora Denham. 

Annie Robinson and "Miss" Nancy Woolford. 

Laura Beatty and "Miss" Annabelle Converse. 

Helen Brigham and "Miss" Sara Borden. 

Margaret Jones and "Miss" Alice Latham. 

Jane Norman and "Miss" Lillian Riddick. 

Anne Brinley and "Miss" Eleanor Relyea. 

Sara Bacon and "Miss" Nellie Dodd. 

Katherine Arbogast and "Miss" Nettie Daniels. 

Louise Arbogast and "Miss" Hattie Copeland. 

Janet Fairley and "Miss" Josephine Myers. 

Sarah Rawlings and "Miss" Mamie Holt. 

Constance Kent and "Miss" Catherine Gilmer. 

Sue Northrop and "Miss" Katherine Elliott. 

Stags: Mae Tredwell, Lucile Anderson, and Minerva Stockton. 

February 15 — Expression Pupils' Recital 

On Tuesday afternoon, February 15th, Miss Davis's Expression 
Pupils gave a very entertaining recital in the Auditorium, followed 
by a one-act play. All the numbers on the program were interesting 
and were well done, especially "The Sociable Seamstress," by Velma 
Jutkins. The play, "Our Aunt From California," proved very 
amusing. The clever acting of Ruby Bartholomew deserves special 
mention. The popularity that these recitals have won was shown 
by the large attendance and the enthusiastic applause. 



Scbool Notes 



Miss Georgia Wilkins, of Columbus, Ga., a St. Mary's girl of a 
number of years ago, was the guest of the School, for a few days after 
the holidays, meeting old friends, making new ones, and taking great 
interest in noting the improvements. She was on her way to New 
York City for the winter. 

It is a great pleasure to have back Nellie Dodd, of Atlanta, and 



146 The St. Mast's Muse. 



Mary Bleakly, of Augusta, Ga., last years girls, who did not get 
back for the Fall Term, and to welcome Virginia Staten, of Char- 
lotte. 

Mrs. Lay's return to the school on January 2 2d, gave us all much 
pleasure. She was called to ISTew Hampshire just before the holidays 
by the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Balch. It is good to know 
that Mrs. Balch is steadily improving, though she will not be able 
to visit the Rectory this winter as she has done in a number of past 
years. 

Word has just reached her friends at St. Mary's of the sudden 
death, last October, at her home in Tampa, Fla., of Miss Hariette 
Lanier, S.M.S. 1911-12. Miss Lamer is remembered at St. Mary's 
especially on account of her talent in art. 

Among the numerous visitors in town for the Farrar Concert 
was Mrs. Dan Parrott, of Kinston, who, as Alice Leigh Hines, '10, 
was a prominent figure in St. Mary's life. This was her first visit to 
her Alma Mater since her marriage to Dr. Parrott last June. 

Thursday evening, January 22th, the "Thursday Night Talk" 
was given by Mrs. Jane McKimmon, head of the Girls' Canning 
Club work in the State. She took dinner with the Rector and after- 
ward spoke on "Home Economics." 

Among the month's visitors have been Rev. Dr. and Mrs. R. B. 
Drane, of Edenton; Dr. Charles O'H. Laughinghouse, of Greenville; 
Mrs. E. B. Wright, of Boardman; Misses Elizabeth and Virginia 
Copeland, of Kinston; Miss Mary Lamb, of Henderson, etc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley G. Roe, of Maryland, old friends of Mr. 
Cruikshank, spent Sunday, February 6th, with Mr. and Mrs. Cruik- 
shank at the School on their way to Florida. Their home is at 
Sudlersville, which is also the home town of Laura Beatty. 

Among the many Valentine parties Monday afternoon was the 
one given by Helen Weakley and Jane DeLoatch, in honor of the 
Seniors. The decorations were of hearts and cupids. Delightful 
refreshments were served in three courses. Every one enjoyed it, 
as it proved to be one of the nicest parties of the season. 

F. R. G. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 147 

Mile. Rudnicka and Mr. Stone are taking muck interest in the 
Raleigh Branch of the Alliance Francaise, which has lately been 
organized. The Raleigh Times said of the recent visit of M. Dela- 
marre, on January 29th: 

Monsieur Louis Delamarre, of New York, the Secretary General of the 
Alliance Frangaise in the United States and Canada, was in Raleigh Friday 
for a conference with that branch of the organization which has been recently 
formed here. Monsieur Delamarre addressed the meeting in the afternoon, 
his subject being the "French Vaudeville," which he treated in a masterly 
manner, not without humor, beginning with an account of its inception and 
growth to the present day. The entire lecture was in French, and was lis- 
tened to with eager interest from start to finish. All who heard it (some 
thirty -five or forty in number) went away with a feeling of keen interest in 
the subject and much impressed by the charm of Monsieur Delamarre's per- 
sonality, so typical of the country which he represents. 

The speaker was introduced by Mrs. W. E. Shipp, the president of the 
Alliance in Raleigh; and after the discourse, expressions of appreciation were 
made by Mrs. Shipp and Madamoisselle Rudnicka of St. Mary's School. 

Miss Eliza Pool was hostess to the meeting on yesterday afternoon, and 
afterwards Monsieur Delamarre was entertained at St. Mary's School by 
Mile. Rudnicka and Dr. and Mrs. George W. Lay. 

Her many friends of 1913-'14 will be much interested in the follow- 
ing announcement, made in the Savannah papers : 

Col. and Mrs. William L. Grayson announce the engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Lynne, to Lieutenant Leo Charles Mueller, of the Coast Guard cutter 
"Yamacraw." 



The St. Mary's Muse 

Subscription Price * ' One Dollar. 

Single Copies - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumns, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hott Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 



Katharine Wimberlt Bourne 
Fannie Marie 



hberlt Bourne, '16 1 -r>, • „ «■„_„ . 

Stallings, '16 ) Buslne3S Managers 



EDITORIAL 



Isn't It Foolisb? 

"Thank fortune the examinations are over ! ISTow we can settle 
down. "Yes, I think that is the way we all feel and we start upon 
the new term with a sigh of relief. But as for "settling down" I 
am afraid the meaning of that is siunmed up in the joyful exclama- 
tion, "Xow that exams, are over we can stop working and rest 
awhile!" 

Isn't it funny how we keep on fooling ourselves ? We blunder 
along and make big mistakes and get ourselves into all sorts of trouble 
and then the day of reckoning comes and we denounce ourselves as 
"crazy" and "idiotic" and determine never to be so foolish again. 
And then when the danger is all nicely passed, we go right back and 
do the same things over again and then wonder why we get into 
trouble. 

Just before examinations you can hear exclamations on all sides 
such as "Why in the world didn't I study this thing!" "If I only 
had a month I could learn something." "Sure thing, next time I'm 
o-oina: to study!" And then when the hurrv and fuss are over, we 



The St. Mary's Muse. 149 



are so tired and we want to rest ! And the May Exams, are such a 
long way off ; such vague shadowy things. Why should we worry ? 

Isn't it funny that we never learn any better, that we never realize 
that this putting off from day to day is the very thing that makes 
examinations such a "bug bear" and necessitates the horrors of a 
"cram." But we never do, and I suppose we never will. We keep 
on our way and instead of taking our work easily, bit by bit, we 
insist on crowding it all into one short week. Well, so it is ! But 
isn't it foolish ? 



The Debates 



With the mid-year comes the mid-term election of the Literary 
Society officers and active preparations for the inter-society debates. 
The elections resulted in few changes. The officers of Epsilon Alpha 
Pi cannot succeed themselves, so Bena Harding takes Helen Wright's 
place as President there, Eleanor Relyea continuing as President 
of Sigma Lambda, and Frances Geitner of Alpha Rho. 

The dates for the debates have been arranged and they will be 
held on the evenings of the second, third and fourth Mondays in 
Lent, March 20, March 27, and April 3. This will be the fourteenth 
year of the inter-society debates and the third series between the three 
societies. Alpha Rho won both of its debates in 1914, Epsilon Alpha 
Pi won both in 1915. It would be strange if we were not all much 
interested in the question of which society will be the winner in 1916. 



With the Rector 

Dr. Lay attended the Convention of Mill Workers which was held 
at Christ Church, January 18th to 22d and on the following Sunday 
brought to our minds the great need for such work. The text of the 
sermon was "But if any provide not for his own, and especially for 
those of his own house, he hath denied the faith and is worse than 
an infidel." He pointed out that the social work in the South was 
the especial duty of us Southerners, that each of us had a responsi- 



150 The St. Mary's Muse. 



bility and that to each of us came a call of some sort. He urged 
the need of training and spoke of the great lack of trained workers. 
From January 23d to the 26th, Dr. Lay attended the North Caro- 
lina Conference for Social Service which met in Charlotte. The 
subject of the meeting was "The Welfare of the Child." 



: 



The Commencement Marshals 

The selection of the Commencement Marshals by the Literary 
Societies is always a matter of prime interest. The elections were 
held this year on February 15th. The Epsilon Alpha Pi had the 
selection of the Chief Marshal this year, and their choice fell on 
Alice Latham, '17, of Plymouth, the Junior Class President. The 
other marshals chosen are Elizabeth Corbitt, of Henderson, and 
Martha Wright Boardman, for Epsilon Alpha Pi ; Katharine 
Drane, '18, of Edenton, the Sophomore Class President, and Sara 
Bacon, of Savannah, for Sigma Lambda ; and jSTellie Rose, '17, of 
Henderson, and Estelle Ravenel, of Valdosta, Ga., for Alpha Rho. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Crtjikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorakt President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorart Vice-Presidents - / Mra " L McK - P^ger- Raleigh. 

v Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



Baptisms in the Chapel 

January 16th: Lucy Evelyn Owen. At the Evening Service 
on Sunday, January 16th, the Rector baptized little Lucy Evelyn 
Owen, aged three months, the heir-apparent of Mr. and Mrs. R. Blinn 
Owen. Miss Dowd, Mrs. Sells (as proxy for the absent aunt of 
Mr. Owen after whom the baby was named), and Judge Hoke, were 
the sponsors. This was the first baptism of the present school year 
in the Chapel. 

January 18th : Maria Drane. At a special service on Tuesday 
afternoon, January 18th, the Rev. R. B. Drane, of Edenton, bap- 
tized his little granddaughter, Maria, second daughter of his son, 
Mr. Brent Drane, who, with his family, is spending this winter in 
Raleigh. Katharine Drane and her mother (as proxy for her younger 
daughter, Marian) acted as godmothers. As the daughter of "Flor- 
ence Thomas" this baby would have a special interest for St. Mary's ; 
and, as both the Dranes and the Thomases have been among the 
staunchest friends of St. Mary's in recent years it seemed especially 
appropriate that the baptism should be in the Chapel. 



152 The St. Mast's Muse. 



0LUMN0E M0RRI0GES 

KING-BATTLE. On Tuesday, February 1st, at Rocky Mount, N. C, Mr. 
William Johnston King and Miss Sallie Haywood Battle, both of Rocky Mount. 

CLARKSON-MITCHBLL. On Monday, January 31st, at Greenville, S. 0., 
Mr. Robert Barnwell Clarkson, of Eastover, S. C, and Miss Mary Gibbes 
Mitchell, of Greenville. 

YATES-ROBERTS. On Wednesday, February 16th, at Raleigh, N. C., Mr. 
K. Waylon Yates and Miss Lucretia Lydia Roberts, both of Raleigh. 

PARDEE-HAUGHTON. On Wednesday, February 23d, at Charlotte, N. C., 
Mr. John Grove Pardee and Miss Jane Hawkins Haughton, both of Charlotte. 



0LUMN0E MUSE 

The next number of the Muse will be the special "School Life 
Number/ 7 which will be ready March 1, and the Alumnae 1ST umber, 
which has been long delayed, will follow March 10th. 



0N L-E-G 

Noiv ON loved sweet MLE, 

And quite B9 was Fate, 
BIf he did with NRG 

SA 2 AYS. 

He flew with EZ XTC, 

Nor NE did XL. 
A B caused him 1 day, ah. me! 

2 DV8. He fell! 

They gave 2 ON ODV 

And XS OP8. 
His brow grew IC, 4, U C, 

Y then it was 2 late. 

"0, ON," MLE did say, 

"No more an NTT, 
I NY even grim DK, 

Your MT FEG." 

Louis B. Capeon, in the Saturday Evening Post. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
i readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
1 them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Dr. L. (in Bible class) — "Miss M., if Jeremiah, Elijah, and Amos were living 
now, what would you call them in terms of today?" 
R. M. (hesitatingly) — "I — I think I'd call them good fortune-tellers." 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Go. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 



'It's worth the difference" 



The Tyrec Studio 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 







m CMMBB 




Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 


« 

a 

7 


& 


nrvRENCH 


> 


Ten per cent off to College Girls 

ftfje Jf astern Fayet S 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 


. (si 


j Exclusive 

§ Millinery 






RALETIGH M.C 




ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 


D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 


HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



Miss U. comes in late to dinner and stops by Miss Thomas' table. 
S. W. — "Is she reporting to Miss Thomas?" 

Heard in Biology class: "Now, girls, we'll skip over flowers and turn to 
grasshoppers. — Ex. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYUN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Oyer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 


H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. 0. Phone 113 


~Z7~ 


W^fJEZrZrJS/^ 





"I'm sorry to have to do this," said Johnny, as he smeared jam over the 
cat's face, "but you know I can't have suspicion turned on me. — Ex. 

Mr. S. (in Civil Government class) — "If the President dies, what happens?" 
A. B. — "He's buried." 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


Hafapette 

A Cafe which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 


Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 






T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 



RICH JEWELRY 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 

HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 

W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing - 



V. R. — "Wait a minute, Mr. Stone, there goes the bell." 

Some one in the class — "That's only the half-hour bell." 

Mr. S. — "Well, you know we have quite a number of belles in this class." 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



0, 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



ners and Banquets a Specialty 



Illy & W/nne Jewelr/Co. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



fflil, Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Watson picture and art co. 

cture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

JMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, O. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-T\ 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrir 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephon 


Calnmet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TRANSI 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH. N C. 
Colleg-e Pennants, Pillows, Pictured 
Frames, Novelties 


Ltdles'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell, & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIAL 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE'', 



Mr. S. (in History) — "Now, can any of you tell me an American towi 
modeled on the old English cities?" 
L. R. (eagerly)— "City Point!" 



Norfolk Southern Railroai 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va, 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 
Raleigh, N. < 




Cite 

&aletg|), J|. <t. 



g>cfjool life dumber 

iWartj), 1916 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

SCHOOL LIFE NUMBER 



Vol. XX. March, 191G. No. 6. 



"Undoubtedly, there is a spirit, distinctive, characteristic, which we 
• may call the 'St. Mary's Spirit.' Let us take care that we do not lose- 
that characteristic which has distinguished the St, Mary's girl from the 
beginning. Let us always remember the qualities for which St. Mary's 
has been representative — culture, refinement, and, above all, the highest 
type of Southern womanhood." 1ST. B. L. 1911. 



Alma Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be, 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name. 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a. lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. Hodgsox. 1905. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Ai,ma Mater 1 

Through the Year at St. Mary's: 

The First Week 3 

The State Fair 7 

Serenades 7 

Hallowe'en 9 

All Saints' — Founders' Day 13 

Basket Ball 14 

The "Christmas Tree" 17 

Examinations 19 

The "Colonial Ball" 21 

Lent 23 

The "Muse Pictures" 23 

The Debates 24 

Easter 27 

The "School Party" 29 

Class Day 31 

Commencement 33 

Every-uay Sketches : 

Saturday Evening 38 

Sunday Morning 39 

Monday Morning 40 

Getting the Mail 41 

Unit-ing 45 

The Chapel Line 49 

Those Dear St. Mary's Girls 50 

St. Mary's Down in Dixie 51 

St. Mary's — My Arrival and My Departure 52 

Farewell, St. Mary's 54 

St. Mary's Hymn 55 

When School Days at Last Have Been Ended 56 

The Souvenir Numbers of the Muse: An Editoriat 57 

Advertisements 59-64 



The St. Mary's Muse 



THROUGH THE YE0R AT ST. MARY'S 

I. Month by Month — September 



The First Weel^ of School 

The melancholy days have come, the saddest of the year, 

Of wailing maids, and missing checks, and text-books dry and drear; 

Heaped in the narrow passages the scattered trunks lie spread, 

And the wrapping-papers rustle wherever you may tread; 

The picnics and the rides are gone, the golf-sticks put away. 

And Mr. C. makes schedules out all through the gloomy day. 

The teachers want certificates from the school you were in last, 
And recall to you the old exam, in which you have not passed; 
They talk about the courses, years, the terms and hours required, 
And dash the soaring hopes that have to entrance high aspired, 
And with music and electives this truth they have impressed: 
The course may be expanded, but it cannot be compressed. 

The Seniors feel the dignity their new position bears, 

And think 'tis reprehensible that youngsters put on airs, 

E'en in these very early days they debate about the Muse 

And the "ads" they must collect, and the rings that they shall choose, 

And presidents and officers speedy meetings do not shirk, 

For societies and clubs are all preparing for their work. 

The Juniors are elated with their senior year in view, 

The Freshman o'er her algebra feels just a trifle blue, 

The Sophomores endeavor to "double" all they can, 

And many a puzzled maiden the catalogue doth scan, 

While the older girls are telling wondrous stories to the new, 

Of what they are expected in meditation-hour to do. 

But when the rules have all been read and the conflicts all arranged, 
And pianos go, and classes meet, you find there's little changed, 
And when the lumps have melted in the strangers' breasts that swell, 
Soon the new girls, like the old girls, come to love St. Mary's well! 

E. E. Checkley. 1904. 

The Solitary Weeper 

(AFTER WORDSWORTH.) 

Behold her, single in the gloom, 

Yon solitary, homesick lass, 
Sighing and sobbing by herself — 

Stop here or gently pass. 
Alone she now bemoans her lot, 
Forsaken in this dreadful spot. 
Ah, listen! for the air around 
Is rendered dismal by the sound. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Will no one tell me why she weeps? 

Perhaps the plaintive wailings rise 
F-om memories of her happy home 

That spring before her eyes; 
Or does she sit and meditate 
How dire and awful is the fate 
Of her who needs must wisdom seek 
And go down town but once a week? 

No place as this in all the world 

Seems quite so God-forsaken, 
And at the thought her cringing form 

By choking sobs is shaken. 
No sweeter thing was ever heard 
Than her dear mother's parting word; 
But she's two hundred miles away, 
And this is just the second day. 

Whate'er the cause, the maiden wept 

As if her grief would have no ending. 
'Twas up to me to comfort her, 

So o'er the damsel bending, 
Although not very good at it, 
I tried to cheer her up a bit — 
"Ah, well, this week's always the worst; 
We all felt just that way at first." 

Nell Battle Lewis. 1910. 



A Dreamer at St. Mary's 



IN THE SCHOOLROOM. 



She sits at her desk with an open book before her. The day is 
bright and sunshiny, but not so, she ; her eyes are seeing so far-away, 
and on her lips is a dreamily mournful half smile. Her thoughts wan- 
der on from the front door of her home into mother's sweet room 
where — the bell! such a harsh, jarring, terrifying, clanging bell! 

She is pushed, crowded, elbowed, punched through a crowd of girls 
down a long passage-way, and finally reaches dry land in the shape of a 
chair under the very nose of some teacher. 

Tier neighbor begins to recite. A dim realization, gradually assum- 
ing immense proportions, creeps into her mind, — she does not belong 



The St. Mary's Muse 



there. After rushing into several Senior and Junior classes, she finally 
discovers the right room, and with a sigh of relief opens the door just 
as her class is being dismissed. 

Back again to the school-room she is jostled and hustled until she 
does not know whether she is standing up or sitting down. After col- 
lecting her thoughts sufficiently to know that she is doing the latter, 
she begins to rejoice in the quiet of the study-hall, when with a rush 
all the home-sickness comes back to her, — and there are three long 
months before Christmas holidays ! What did the girls at home do 
last night? Sister went to a ball, she knew, but that was for the older 
set. Her own friends, perhaps, went out rowing. Could she not see 
them now with the glorious moon mystically lighting up the little white 
boats and glistening on the wet oars as they came out of the water ? 
Yes, there go Connie and Tom up the river where her boat used to meet 
theirs every night. For an instant she almost thinks she is with Jamie 
in the bateau, drift — that bell again ! 

From now on she has not time to think any more until she gratefully 
journeys 

IN THE LAND OF NOD. 

It is such a peculiar place, so quiet, so still, and yet with a confused 
rumble in the air overhead, and it all seems to come out of a big, black 
cloud, called "Where-to-go." In front is a forest of little trees named 
Duties, which begin to grow as soon as she looks at them. Looking to 
the left end, she sees a large sign-board marked, "Do not take time to 
read this, but go in to your classes at 10:30; go to A Latin, B Science, 
M History, D English, 1ST French and P German, all at the same time. 
You have not time to stop. Go on forever, and keep on going." 

She stands gazing at this, reading it over and over, until something 
catches her elbow, and shrieks, "What's your name?" "Where are yon 
from ?" "How many brothers and sisters have you ?" "How old are 
you?" "When did you come?" "How do you like it?" "How many 
lessons ?" "Hard course ?" She scarcely has time to ask a breathless 
"What?" when a more imposing something with "Senior" printed on 
its forehead grasps an inch of her sleeve, and in a stentorian squeak de- 
mands, "Can I do anything for you?" "I want to go home," is all the 
answer she can give. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 



"Well, replies the Thing-named-Senior, "I never have tried, but I 
suppose I could take you there and back, before the next bell rings. I 
can do most anything. Come on." 

In an instant she and the Thing-named-Senior stand before her 
mother's door. She throws open the door and rushes toward her mother. 
Midway her guide grabs her, and squeaks hurriedly, "Can't stop, 
come on." 

She is hauled on past her own room, past the dining-room, and when 
she gets to the parlor and is just about to sit down on her favorite divan, 
her guide again angrily shrieks, "Can't stop, come on, half a minute 
before the bell !" Back out of the front door they race together, on 
down the street to Connie's house. She is just about to speak to her 
friend when the Thing-named-Senior squeaks, "Come on, can't stop." 

On, on to the river, and somehow it is moonlight there. Jamie is 
waiting at the landing in the bateau for her, and she is just about to 
step into it, when the Thing-named-Senior gives her sleeve a desperate 
twitch, and with a last farewell "Can't stop, come — ," disappears, and 
there is in the distance a faint sound of a bell which comes nearer, 
nearer, NEARER. Sadie M. Jenkins. 1904. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



October 

Two Serenades 

The night was fair in its glory — 

Ah! that was long ago — 
And beneath a maiden's window 

A youth sang soft and low. 
He played his guitar gently, 

The music could scarce be heard, 
But the maiden who listened above him 

Caught every soft-breathed word. 

The serenade — it was Schubert's — 

Ah, that was long ago — 
And a red rose fell from the window 

To the singer who stood below, 
Who strummed then a wild, glad scherzo; 

Its strains showed his pure delight — ■ 
A perfect harmony reigned there — 

Music, love, and a star-lit night. 



The campus was dark with shadows, 

The night was — a short while ago — 
There stood 'neath a schoolgirl's window 

Six youths with their cigarettes aglow. 
They whispered with laugh and cajolery 

Before they began to sing; 
With tenors and basses so hearty 

They made the whole welkin ring. 

The serenade — was it Schubert's? — ■ 

On that night but a short while ago, 
When no red rose fell from the window 

To the singers who stood below. 
Ah! no, 'twas no such sweet melody 

Broke the silence of night divine; 
They sang of a goat named Hiram 

That ate shirts from mother's clothes line. 

Patsey Harry Smith. 1912 



After the pair 

(AFTER TENNYSON.) 

Broke, broke, broke! 

That's the state of the case with me ; 
And I would that I my coin had spent 

Not quite so lavishly. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Oh, 'tis well for the fakir to fake, 

And pocket the coins with a grin; 
Oh, 'tis well for the showman to boast 

And rope all the credulous in. 

But the pleasant ice cream man 

Has most of the pelf, I ween, 
And it's oh for the sight of my hard-earned cash 

One glimpse of the lost "long green." 

Broke, broke, broke! 

I moan in deep despair. 
But 'tis only what one might expect 

Prom a day at the "Great State Pair." 

Nell Battle Lewis. 1910. 



"The Great State pair" 

"State Fair Day" — that precious day on which we have the privilege 
of wandering out to the Fair Grounds (a very dignified wandering 
and well chaperoned) and spending an afternoon in being educated by 
the exhibits, agricultural and otherwise, watching the fakirs and patron- 
izing the "great side-shows," with an occasional glimpse at the races or 
the balloon ascension or the aeroplane flight ; coming home at five laden 
with "squedimks" and balloons and red candy and toy dogs and such 
like treasures for those of our less fortunte sisters as seemingly lack the 
faculty of enjoying such delightful hilarity — that great day is over. 

As we look back at it, it is not so very different from other State Fair 
Days. Perhaps mindful of that familiar little verse, 

There was a young lady named May — 
Who was perhaps just a bit gay; 

She went to the Fair 

And flirted while there, 
The train took her home the next day. 

we are on our usual good behavior, for there are no evil consequences 
of our visit. AVe have a very good time and see many old friends. 
Why even the "trained fleas" are there. 

Our chief authority on the subject, "Ducky," whose unbiased appre- 



The St. Mary's Muse 



ciation is never tempered with regret of past pleasures, says, in rehears- 
ing all her wonderful experiences: 

"Honey, I seen so much I jest don't know whar to begin, but there was one 
Ithing I'll tell you 'bout — 'Old Mammy Jane' — she knit with her elbows — yes, 
darlin', her elbows. They said as how she was an ol' witch and got her arms 
burnt off some way and now when she says 'Howdy do' to anybody it'll bring 
'em good luck. Anyhow, I seen her crochet with her elbows, myself. Sugar, 
she stuck her needles in them little places where the bone used to be and knit 
better'n I could. 

"Then I seen an old nigger do the 'rag-time dance.' He was all spotted up — 
a black spot here and a white one there, all over his face, and when he danced 
he kicked up his heels to his nose — honest, honey — no, I didn't see him hit his 

jmose, but he come mighty nigh doing it. He sho' did dance lively. 

"A little farther down they had a show with the ugliest little woman in it. 
She was just about so high and fat — ugh! She was a sight, and her jaw stuck 
out and her nose come down 'till they most meet. When I come out the man 

i axed me to give all the people standing 'round my opinion of what I thought of 
the show, and so I stood up and told 'em it was truly fine — it was only ten cents, 
but it was certainly worth a quarter. Then they all hollered and laughed and 
a man asked me if I had ever seen a 'snake eater.' I told him, 'Lord-a-massey, 
no,' and he said 'You come on, then.' So he took me up to where a man was 
sitting in a big tin pan and he was all a-growling and snakes crawling all over 
him, and his teeth — . Sugar, you never seen such teeth; they was that long and 
all pointed — and he bit into the snakes, going 'g-r-r-r.' I said, 'Master, help 

1 me — lemme git out of here.' 

"And next thing I went up to see the oscrades — yes'm, you know them 

' things — you git feathers out of 'em. Yes'm, I knew it was something like that — 

; 'oscrades' — I can't say it like you do, so let's call 'em birds — the man he called 

; 'em. birds, and, honey, he said they was so strong they could knock a horse down 
with one wing and then he went and got on one and rode him up and down 

; jest like a horse. 

"Oh, but, darlin' — the funniest thing I ever seen in all my life. Sugar, it was 
them trained hoppergrasses and crickets! Honey, it beat the world — they drug 
little wagons round like they was working for their living, and I 'bout died 
laughing. The man axed if I ain't ever seen any before. I told him, 'Honey, 

; I've seen many things, but I ain't never seen a trained hoppergrass like that 
before' — oh! yes, and fleas, too — trained fleas. I was that tickled he let me stay 
in for another round. Darlin', it was worth a lot. No'm, I can't tell you any 
more, 'cause if I don't clean up I'll git into trouble, but, Sugar, you jest ought to 
have seen them crickets — you missed a sight." Mary C. Shuford. 1911. 



Hallowe'en 

Hallowe'en ! There comes the thought of witches and elves and bril- 
liant autumn leaves and pumpkin lanterns, grinning at the thought of 
their own ugliness, and apples, very red. That is the time when those 



10 



The St. Maky's Muse 




The Day After "Hallowe'en" ok After the "Colonial B. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 

of us who are still children enough to believe in fairies are glad of the 
belief. It is good to think that somewhere under the clear, crisp stars 
the witches are a-riding, and that somewhere in the moonlit woods the 
gay elves dance. 

The afternoon before Hallowe'en is a very busy one. Everywhere 
girls sew or crimp paper or paint busily, or do some other of the thousand 
and one things that must be done before the costume can be finished. 
And then, when the dressing-up begins, what a hurrying and scurrying 
and a little fussing too, on the side. For it is provoking when you — 
a would-be "pirate bold" — find that your room-mate has very carelessly 
used your " whiskers" as a fringe for her Indian costume. But when 
the "big bell" rings things straighten themselves out somehow and a 
very motley throng crowd into the schoolroom to form in line for the 
"Grand March." Everybody is laughing and whispering and wonder- 
ing "who in the world is that?" 

Ah ! The first note of the grand march sounds ; the "little children" 
giggle and scamper ahead, and the procession starts. It circles round 
and round the parlor with slow and solemn tread, while the Jack-O'- 
Lanterns blink from among the leaves. A very strange procession it 
is — ghosts and witches and clowns and nuns and gypsies, and many 
other strange and fanciful characters compose it. Then the lights are 
turned on, and the dancing begins. To be sure there is quite a little 
jostling and treading on toes, but who cares % And so the fun goes on. 
* # * -* * * * 

Half-past nine ! A discordant bell, a groan from many throats, and 
the Indian whose war paint is slightly smeared puts an arm around 
the little girl with disheveled hair, whose sash is awry, and they go 
slowly upstairs ; and the convict kisses the witch good-night. 

And so it ends. Xell Battle Lewis. 1910. 



Hallowe'en 
11:00 A. M. 
She's just a plain St. Mary's girl, 

A dainty little maid, 
Who hates to get the fatal "slip" 
And loves a serenade. 



1 2 The St. Mary's Muse 

8:30 P. M. 
But now she is a powdered dame 

With gems and rare old lace, 
Whose sweeping train is managed 

With dexterity and grace. 

Or now she is a fearful "spook," 

Who moves in solemn gloom; 
And now an old and wrinkled witch, 

A-riding on a broom. 

With clumping sabots now she comes, 

A Dutch girl "just too cute"; 
Nor does she fear the Indian brave 

That's in such hot pursuit. 

She turns now to the happy days 

Of childhood, free from care; 
A little girl, with flowing curls, 

She hugs her Teddy Bear. 

Now quite demure she "tells her beads," 

And counts them one by one; 
Absorbed in meditation deep, 

A sweet and pious nun. 

She new appears a Puritan, 

In simplest fashion dressed; 
And now, with clanking spurs, she comes 

Straight from the "wild, wild West." 

And now a sporty college chap 

With trousers rolled just right, 
And now a little "nigger gal" 

With "pig-tails" plaited tight. 

10: 00 P. M. 
Oh, yes, she can be all these things, 

But at the stroke of ten 
You'll see, if you're observant, 
Just the same sweet girl again. 

Nell Battle Lewis. 1910. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



November. 

All Saints' Day at St. Mary's 

"Hm — - — , 7:30! Another half-hour to sleep, thank fortune." And 

■ suiting the action to the word, the slumberer turns over, and knows 
practically nothing more until breakfast time. For one's early morn- 

I ing thoughts are, if not vague and indefinite, at least anything but keen. 
What a strange mixture of the week today seems ; this holy day, of 

; All Saints. Half the subdued quiet of Sunday, and yet the drowsy, 

, day-after-a-frolic feeling still lingers in the air. 

Last night was Hallowe'en and in proof of this, girls in gay attire 
flock out into the Autumn sunshine in merry groups ; and laughing, 
chattering, and swinging kodaks, gather to have their pictures taken ; 
paper dolls, witches, Indians, cadets, ghosts, stately ladies and gentle- 
men, all mingle together. Other girls are seen strolling idly around 
the grove, enjoying the nothing-is-hanging-over-me feeling of a holiday. 
Still others are seen hurrying busily back and forth from chapel, filling 
vases, or looking for "Miss Katie" to ask directions of her; plainly 
bespeaking the Altar Guild. 

Then the bell rings for the eleven o'clock service, and the girls assem- 
ble, form and march toward the chapel. They pass the covered-way, 
and the notes of the organ swell out on the air; the choir takes up the 
words of the hymn and gradually down to the end of the line girl after 
girl joins in the triumphant song: 

Hark, the sound of holy voices, 

Chanting at the crystal sea, 
Alleluia, alleluia, 

Alleluia, Lord, to Thee: 
Multitude which none can number, 

Like the stars in glory stands, 
Clothed in white apparel, holding 

Palms of victory in their hands. 

The last girl has passed on, over the threshold of the chapel and into 
the holy quiet within. 

The crown over the altar and the lighted candles burn with a white 
light ; the bunches of chrysanthemums filling the chancel form soft 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



masses of color ; and now the silence and stillness grows in intensity, 
until it seems as if the solemn hush pervading the chapel could be felt, 
by a congregation made one, by the words of the Bishop: "I believe 
in the communion of saints" — 

At length the organ sounds the recessional and one by one the chapel 
is deserted, and the music fades into the words 

Oh, blest communion, fellowship divine, 
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine; 
Yet all are one in Thee, for all are Thine. 

Alleluia! 

drift and linger, then die away at last, and are succeeded by quiet for a 
minute, but only for a minute, for a jolly babel breaks out as soon as 
the girls pass the silence bounds. 

Assembly over, they disperse into groups, wander out on the grass 
and fall into a discussion of last night's events. Snatches of sentences 
are caught by the passer-by : "Didn't she look simply dear ?" and "I 
never would have known who she was" ; "Oh how funny, I knew her 
voice right away !" Well, I had the time of my life bobbing for apples, 
but it certainly was disastrous to my water-color complexion." "Surely, 
hun, you don't indulge — " The ringing of the lunch bell just then 
proves an interruption as well as a welcome sound. 

Margaret Strange Broadeoot. 1011. 



Basket Ball 

For days before the great event, one hears at lunch period songs and 
yells issuing from the different class rooms where Athletic meetings are 
being held and on this fated day itself, enthusiasm and excitement reign 
supreme. Even the laziest, most languid, unenthusiastic girls in School 
do not escape the infection. We see one displaying a blue arm band 
while another appears with a huge red bow pinned to her sleeve. 

And now at half past two the two associations are massing to march 
to the field. Out on the court some of the Faculty and a few nonparti- 
sans have gathered. Suddenly in the distance appears a flash of color, 
flowing ties and glowing armbands, a swaying mass of crimson and 
triumphant voices singing. The Sigmas are coming on the run. Hardly 



The St. Mart's Muse 



15 




Games in the "Gym. 




The East Tennis Courts. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 

have thej' reached the court than around the Chapel swings a long 
line swaying in rhythm to their chanting. Everywhere blue, — blue 
ties, blue armbands, blue hats, blue stockings, — and everywhere strong 
triumphant voices ringing determination, shouting defiance. The Sigma 
cheer leader is rallying her forces to cheer, the Mus are gathering for an 
answering yell. Back and forth fly yells and songs, and taunts and 
choruses of defiance until the referee's whistle sounds and the two 
teams run to their positions. Again that shrill whistle striking chill 
terror to qaking hearts and the ball goes up in the center. A tense frac- 
tion of a second and the Blues have it. Down the court it goes flying 
to the goal. Jump, Red guard ! Break it up ! Ah, she has it. Back it 
goes again to the center where it is again whirled to the Blue side only to 
be caught and sent spinning to the Bed goal. Back and forth it goes. 
Now it is in the basket ; now it is almost in. Each side holds its breath, 
tense with excitement. The whistle sounds loudly. Some one has 
made a line foul. A forward takes the ball and steps back for a free 
throw. Everyone holds her breath, one conlcl hear a pin fall. She 
takes slow steady aim. The ball slips from her hand and falls into the 
basket. A roar of triumph shakes one side of the court, broken in upon 
by the shrill whistle calling time on the first half. And now the two 
sides rally for more cheering, those who are ahead elated with the vision 
of victory, the others determined not to appear discouraged. Behind 
their sturdy supporters the teams are resting, wrapped in their sweaters 
and surrounded by enthusiastic groups of admiring friends. Again the 
whistle calls them to position and the game is on. The side lines are 
tenser now, the game is more vital, they are playing in more deadly 
earnest. Fewer goals are made but in one basket the ball falls oftener 
and the whistle calls time on a score of eight to six. 

One side of the court seems to have gone mad, screaming and crying 
and hugging each other while the other puts on a brave face and takes 
defeat like a sportsman. 

Slowly the crowd streams away to where ice-cream is being sold, red 
ties and blue mingled together, the defeated bent on treating their vic- 
tors. And each side is determined to win next time, the victors to main- 
tain their record and the conquered to wipe out their defeat. 

Anxie S. Cameron. 1915. 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



December 



Trje Christmas Tree 

The excitement began at dinner. You will not soon forget the big 
Christmas bells hanging from the lights, the tiny Christinas trees shim- 
mering and sparkling on each table, the sigh of joy that greeted the 
fried oysters, and the merry talk and laughter. But that is over now. 
The big School Room clock ticks monotonously. Cruel monster to 
drag along at that slow pace when a hundred hearts are pounding in a 
hundred ears, when a hundred pairs of eyes gaze longingly, beseechingly 
at its face, and excitement like a charge of electricity fairly vibrates in 
'the room. How can you even pretend to study with tomorrow staring 
:you in the face and tonight in the shape of a big Christinas tree calling 
you, calling you to the gym. All afternoon girls have been working 
there, gaily and steadily, twisting crepe paper, twining cedar, sorting 
Jout candles and hanging wreaths. All day long a big hamper has stood 
| in the office to receive "knocks'' and now its contents lie in gay heaps 
at the foot of the tree. A few girls are still there taking a last glance 
iat the bright candy bags, straightening the candles or stepping back to 
I admire it all. 

In study hall the situation has become intolerable. The slow hands 

i have crept around to three minutes, two minutes, one minute, — There ! 

1 Eight o'clock: A sudden tap of the bell, the tension snaps. A hundred 

gay voices, laughing, singing, shouting, chattering all at once, a rush 

and a scramble for the door and the procession is off to the gym. But 

■) it is a gym no longer. No wonder that the first to reach the threshold 

■ stand agape, unmindful of blocking the way until pushed forward by the 

i impatient ones behind. No, it is not the gym. It is a realm of fairy- 

I land, the abode for Santa Claus and all his elves. In the middle of the 

i room stands the big pine tree, the dim recesses of its misty boughs 

I twinkling and shimmering with a hundred tiny candles. At its foot 

are heaped the "knocks" and the candy bags, mountains of color. From 

the ceiling overhead, to the ends of the room wind streamers of red crepe 

paper, while wreaths adorn the windows and the big cedar rope is looped 

along the walls on the window ledges. Flickering in the gentle night 

2 



18 



The St. Mary's Muse 



wind, the white candles shed their soft mellow light over all. Hark ! In 
the distance the sound of clear voices ringing. A hush falls over the 
babel of the room. Nearer and nearer they come till in at the side door, 
dressed in white and each bearing a candle come the girls singing, sing- 
sing. Clearly and reverently the fresh voices rise through the hushed 
stillness. "Holy Night, Silent Night. 1 ' Carol follows carol, Christ- 
mas hymn and merry Yuletide song. Everybody joins in until again 
there falls a hush and through the midst of the merry crowd comes Santa 
Claus himself, the jolly old rogue, accompanied by four elves. Then 
the lights are switched on and the fun begins. What laughter and clap- 
ping there is as Santa Claus reads out the ''knocks" and the gay pile at 
the foot of the tree is distributed. 

Over in the corner the servants are looking on with shining eyes, 
awaiting with eager expectation the moment when their presents are to 
be given out, for they too have their part in the Christinas Tree. At 
this jolly celebration no one is forgotten. 

Everywhere is joy and merriment, and that night when you go to bed 
you are thankful for Christmas, thankful for tomorrow, thankful for the 
home to which you are going and away down in your heart, though you 
may not realize it just then, you are thankful that you are corning back 
to St. Mary's after the holidays. Annte g< Camekon> 1915- 



"I brought the Christmas season when I came, 
And filled St. Mary's full of joy and mirth; 
I covered all the grove with whitest snow, 
And soon the maidens glad did homeward go 
To keep the time of peace, good-will on earth." 



The St. Mary's Muse 1!) 



January 

Examinations 

A feeling of gloom is in the air. This morning as the girls file slowly, 
relunctantly, out of Chapel one can not help thinking of the proverhial 
"Lamb to the Slaughter." jSTow it is almost time for the "English 



•s 



exam." In the office girls are scrambling for pencils. Their conversa- 
tion drifts out to us while we are passing. 

"Did Milton write 'To a Daisy' ?" 

"]STo ! You crazy ! But, tell me, did she say Carlyle's work was inade- 
quate' ?" 

Hark ! What is that ? The bell ! It strikes chill terror to the quaking 
hearts. Slowly the girls are gathering in the School Room, giving last 
frantic glances at their notebooks at the door. And now the papers are 
being given out. Happy the one who glances at the questions and can 
give a sigh of satisfaction and relief and begin to write. Unfortunate 
one who has not studied and does not know ! The clock ticks on relent- 
lessly and her mind remains a blank. 

Out in the grove the lucky few who have no exams today laugh and 
talk and feel that after all, exams are not so bad. 

In all sorts of odd corners girls are studying for the next exam. 

"Who came after Henry VIII ?" 

"Oh, I don't know. Let me see, the area of a circle is equal to the 
base — . Oh, goodness, I can't learn Geometry." 

The English Exam is over now. Girls drift out in twos and threes 
and talk it all over. Then comes History and French. One exam fol- 
lows another and by degrees the atmosphere lightens and brightens. 

Finally the last one has been stood and you heave a great sigh of re- 
lief. You are quite sure you are going to study harder next term and 
although you have to admit that the exams were not as bad as you 
imagined, still you are very glad to settle down again into the daily 

routine - Annie S. Cameron. 1915. 



20 


The St. Mary's Muse 






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The St. Mary's Musk 21 



pebruary 

The Colonial Ball 

Who said there was no such thing as magic % I defy him: Let him 
come with me into the parlor on the night of February 22d and see for 
himself. Surely this is the good year 19 — A. D., but we find ourselves 
in the midst of the 18th century. Everywhere are curtesying ladies 
with flowered panier and powdered curl, with dimple and with beauty 
spot, and a big fan to blush behind. And everywhere are young gallant-; 
in knee breeches, silverbuckles, powdered queue and high stock. If this 
is not magic, what is? "Ah" you say, "But you have not seen behind 
the scenes. You have not witnessed the mad search for bloomers, the 
frantic crimping and basting of crepe paper, the raid upon talcum pow- 
der, and the scramble for pasteboard and tinfoil." ISTo matter, I still 
maintain it is magic. The magic of forgetting ourselves, the magic of 
being someone else. So let us laugh and dance and bow and curtsey 
and be our grandmothers and grandfathers, just for tonight. 

What a gayly mottled throng it is. There goes an English officer, 
splendid in his red regimentals, and here an American patriot in his buff 
and blue. Strange guests have found their way to the ball. Two 
pirates pass us, knives in their belts, red handkerchiefs at their throats, 
rough beards and fierce eyes, glorying in their own ugliness. Here is a 
staunch backwoodsman with his cartridge belt and hatchet and over 
there an Indian Chief is dancing with a beauty worthy of his majesty's 
court. 

At the other end of the room the prosaic ones who refused to be their 
grandmothers look on rather wistfully and wish that they had not been 
so literal minded. 

Starting with the Virginia Reel, figure follows figure, melting at 
last into the waltz and two-step. What light feet, what light hearts, 
what merry laughter ! 

All too soon comes the dreaded sound, the harsh clang of the nine- 
thirty bell and, as with Cinderella at the stroke of twelve, the spell is 
broken, the magic dispelled. Out of the romance and glamor of "Yes- 
terday" we come, to climb weary flights of steps, to go to bed to dream 
of shoe buckles and powder and crepe paper and lords and ladies of the 
olden times. Ajwie S. Cameron. 1915. 



9-7 



The St. Maky's Muse 




And I'll see dear old St. Mary's, 
And the Chapel in the light, 

As the golden glory floods the sky, 
And the sun sinks out of sight. 

Girls pouring from the doorways 

In one continuous stream, 
Gay as the bridge to Asgard, 

Will come into my dream; 
And like the pious Arab, 

When called to prayer at night, 
I'll join the throng at Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 



The organ's solemn pealing — ■ 

"Dear Lord, abide with me, 
For fast doth fall the eventide," 

Will often comfort me, 
While visions of St. Mary's 

Will come to me at night, 
And I'll see the Chapel in the glow 

As the sun sinks out of sight. . . . 

Anne Archbell. 1905. 



The St. Mary's Muse 'l'-\ 



March 



Lent 

Ash Wednesday: and Lent has started. Down in the class-rooms the 
Sunday School classes are gathering to get their mite-boxes. The girls 
laugh and talk as they fold the pasteboard into shape. "What are you 
going to give up ?" "Butter," says one ; "candy," another ; while a 
third declares grandly, "I'm not going toi be late at Study Hall a single 
time. See if I am!" The days slip by quickly. On Wednesday and 
Friday evenings the girls in hats and coats may be seen going to Chapel. 
There is no dancing at night but a merry group still gathers in the par- 
lor to laugh and talk and sing. 

On the whole, the days are very pleasant; but there are tragic mo- 
ments, as when ice cream appears on Wednesday (an unheard of thing) 
and you have given up dessert. In the dormitories you may hear such 
conversations as "I'll make up your bed and pull down the window for 
ten cents a week." "Thank you, but I guess I'll do it myself. I'm 
going to stop being lazy this Lent." Or out in the hall — "What have 
you got ? Not a box ! Well, I declare, this is the limit. That's the 
third box on this hall since Lent started and I'm not eating between 
meals. It's just the 'Irony of Fate.' " 

There is to be a ball game and the girls look at the passing crowds 

wistfully. "Never mind," they say, "We'll go after Easter." Indeed 

Easter is the "great event" now. Everyone is looking forward to it 

and longing for it to come. But each girl realizes on that morning as 

she enters the Chapel bright with flowers and joins in the joyous Easter 

anthem that this glorious day would not be so bright and beautiful had 

there been no quiet days of Lent. . „ ~ . n . 

1 J Annie Sutton Cameron. 1914. 



The Battle Cry 

A crowd of girlies hurry 

Through the streets at fearful pace; 
A res'lute gleam is in each eye, 

A set look on each face. 

And to the wondering shopper 
That may chance to pass them by 

There rises from the hurrying throng 
This grim, determined cry: 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



"We'll pass straight by dear Cally's, 

His luscious fruits we'll spurn, 
And if he speaks of 'Love's Delight,' 

The shoulder cold we'll turn. 

"Not the joys of chicken salad, 

Not the last 'Best Seller's' fame, 
Not the charms of Brantley's sherry 

Can our worthy ardor tame. 

"Not the most delicious package 

Of the sweets that Royster hath 
Can serve to turn our feet aside 

From duty's rugged path. 

"And we'll pass the tempting 'Fashion' 

Without e'en a fleeting look, 
For we're on our way to Tyree's 

To have our pictures took." 

• $ $ £ 4 * * 

Now as in the dusk of evening, 

Home the girlies wend their way, 
The shopper hears, in passing them, 

The tired damsels say: 

"Oh, we've shown such wild school spirit, 

It would satisfy e'en Crook, 
For we've spent the day at Tyree's, 

But we've had our pictures took." 

Nell Battle Lewis. 1911. 

The Debate 

What a buzz of conversation ! An Auditorium full of excited girls all 
talking at once ! Full did I say ? jSTo, that is not true, the whole middle 
section is almost empty. The reason is simple. It is the inter-society 
debate and only a few "sit on the fence" tonight. All day the excite- 
ment has run high. The debaters themselves have been surrounded by 
eager groups with the vital question, "How do you feel ?" "Goodness, 
you're not going to be scared ?" "Don't forget I'm counting on you." 
The office has been crowded with an eager knot who are buying "colors" 
and everywhere the bright bits of ribbon flutter defiantly, pinned over 
loyal hearts. All afternoon a little group of girls has been busy decora- 
ting the stage— pinning up big pennants and banners with many a pause 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 

■ for a rapturous hug and the fevered exclamation "We've just got to win !" 
And now this preparation is over, the time has come and the opposite 
sides of the Auditorium are packed with loyal partisans each confi- 
dent of victory. 

Suddenly the talking stops. All eyes are fastened on the stage where 

; a girl in a black gown enters, followed by four girls in white dresses — ■ 
the debaters. A wave of enthusiasm sweeps over the audience and the 
girl in the black gown waits patiently for it to subside. Now she is 
speaking; she states the query and then "The first on the Affirmative, 

Miss " and a girl rises from the right hand table and 

steps to the front of the stage amid a storm of applause. "Madam 
President, honorable judges, fellow students" — There is a slight quiver 
in her voice, her face is rather pale but there is about her an air of 
"do or die" determination which is impressive. Clearly and logically 
she develops her argument. At last she has finished. The right hand 
side of the audience seems to have gone wild. With flushed faces and 
shining eyes they clap as though they never intended to stop. Then 
the first on the negative ; the affirmative, and, the negative again. Clear 
girlish voices filled with earnestness and conviction, fine young faces 
fired with enthusiasm and determination; the same wild clapping; and 
then comes the rebuttal. At last it is over. The girl in the black 
gown rises quietly. "Let us sing 'Alma Mater,' " she says and the whole 
audience rises to its feet as one person. 

From a piano hidden somewhere behind the scenery come the strains 
so well known and so well loved, and sing — how the girls are singing. 
Their voices shake with emotion and the building rings with their song 
"St. Mary's, wherever thy daughters may be." Their voices rise 
clear and eager. During the last verse a girl is seen to leave the 
audience. In her hand she bears three envelopes — the judges' decision. 
In a moment she appears on the stage and giving them to the girl in 
the gown, quickly retires. The girl holds them in her hand ; she is 
looking at them. Slowly the last strains of the song die away. There 
is a tense stillness, a stillness that can be felt. Then a clear voice break- 
ing the silence: "The judges have decided in favor of the Negative." 
One dazed instant ; a quick intake of breath and then — Has everyone 
gone mad ? Pandemonium breaks loose ! Screams, screams that rend the 



!>() 



The St. Mary's Muse 



air, laughing and weeping, everywhere girls locked in each other's arms 
and more than all a mad rush for the stage — a regular whirlwind of 
shouting, screaming, laughing, crying girls. The scenery reels and 
totters before this irresistible tidal wave of triumph. At the first word 
the defeated debaters had hurried across to congratulate the winners ; 
but they are not together long for this wild mob bursts upon the stage 
to grab them and revolve round and round, fighting for a place next to 
them, every one talking at once, laughing and weeping and here and 
there a few with tears of joy rolling down their cheeks too excited or too 
hoarse to scream any more, meeting their friends in a silent embrace 
of pure rapture. Long as it seems it lasts only a few minutes. There 
is a general movement towards the door and amid the laughter and 
tears and joyful shouts of their companions the debaters are borne away 
in triumph and the crowd disperses to celebrate the victory by "mid- 
night feasts" or similar forms of hilarity. 

Annie S. Cameron. 1915. 



She took her place before good Father Time, 
'Mid tears and smiles, and all in pretty rhyme, 
Began a tale of maidens, ah! so wise: 

'Oh, Father, had you seen those maidens there. 
Studying from early morn till midnight late, 
Lost in the pages of some monstrous books, 
Their faces bearing wise and knowing looks. 
You'd wondered what the cause; 'twas the Debate. 




The St. Mary's Muse 27 



April 



Easter 

The sun has risen. Long yellow rays slant over tender green grass 
and tip with gold the feathery young leaves of the grove. It is early 
morning and the glad earth in her young green and early flowers wel- 
comes again the Glorious Resurrection. Out in the grove the birds are 
singing as though mad with joy, and through the beautiful morning sun- 
light down the path to the Chapel come the girls two and two dressed 
\ in simple white. The morning light itself is reflected in these bright 
young faces and all the joy of the rejoicing world seems filling their 
hearts as the fresh voices rise clearly, triumphantly, through the hushed 
perfumed stillness of the Chapel. 

"At the Lamb's high feast we sing — " Everywhere we are surrounded 
by flowers, by flowers and light. The Chancel windows cast long rays 
of purple and scarlet which tinge the white Altar Cloth with color, and 
creeping farther touch the bowed heads at the Altar rail. And as we 
kneel there in that place made holy by the prayers of all those who have 
gone before us, we feel a deeper realization of that bond between us, the 
bond of fellowship and of brotherhood, the close bond of love. 

At last the Service is over. 

"Christ is risen! Christ is risen! 
He hath burst His bonds in twain — " 

Out into the sunshine again come the girls singing joyously. 

There follows the eleven o'clock Service and Evening Prayer. All 
the services are beautiful, all joyful and triumphant, but the spirit of 
them all seems embodied in that fellowship of the early morning, that 
coming together through the fresh still Easter Dawn to meet the Risen 
Lord. Annie S. Cameron. 1915. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse 



Easter Egg Hunt 

The Chapel line is certainly in a hurry tonight. The girls fairly 
tumble up the steps in their haste to get through into assembly, and 
wait with tense eagerness to be excused. A stranger might ask the 
cause of such excitement — a stranger, but no one who had been at St. 
Mary's on Easter Monday night and had attended the big egg hunt in 
the grove. At last the bell is tapped and what a rush and scramble for 
the door. They dash down the steps and out under the trees where big 
Japanese lanterns nod a cheery invitation. Such hurrying and scurry- 
ing, such talking and laughing with every now and then shouts of tri- 
umph as some new hiding place is discovered. a How many have yon, 
Mary?" "Seven, and mercy! here's one, two, three,- — four more. That's 
eleven ! What you bet I get the prize ?" "Well goodness, I haven't 
found but one, I don't see where you get them from." Red, yellow, 
pink, white, and purple eggs — there seems to be no end to them ! After 
a while however the discoveries become fewer and farther between and 
at last the big bell is rung for the searching to stop. Everybody hur- 
ries to Main Building steps where the eggs are counted. One girl has 
twenty-one so amid much laughter and joking she is presented with the 
prize- — a big white rabbit. Then laughing and talking and eating her 
candy eggs, everybody hurries to join the "Mail line" which is quickly 
being formed in front of East Rock. 



J^t**%Jt)L4k 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 

May 



The School Party 

For the past week there has been a Class meeting almost every day 
1 the lunch period and all sorts of plans have been whispered about, to 
ay nothing of the secret cutting and basting and crimping of crepe 
■paper. 

j And now on the night of the School Party all the classes in costume 
.lire gathered in the School Koom awaiting the moment when the parlor 
loors shall be thrown open to them. The parlor itself has been trans- 
formed into a bewildering maze of color. From the lights at the ends 
fcf the room wind paper streamers, green and white, purple and violet, 
iicarlet and gray, black and orange, and pink and blue. All the class 
olors lead to the places where the classes are to sit. 

\ At last the doors are thrown open and the march begins. The 
1'Preps" in the lead, dressed in white aprons and blue sunbonnets with 
oink bows. The Freshmen follow in black and orange caps, and then 
the Sophomores in purple and violet paper dresses, to be followed in 
hirn by the Juniors in green frills and white flounces. Last of all come 
,;he Seniors in their red caps and gowns carrying diplomas, and gather 
around the piano. 

At this party the Seniors are hostesses and now they are singing a 
song of welcome to the Faculty and girls. As the applause dies away 
the little sunbonneted Preps rise to sing their Class Song. They are 
followed by the Freshman, the Sopomores and the Juniors, each Presi- 
dent speaking a few words for her class. At last it comes the Seniors' 
turn and they too sing their Class Song followed by other songs and 
toasts. Songs about those whom we love and admire and comic songs 
'about things around School. Toasts to the Faculty and the whole 
School and a few words from the Rector, Miss Katie and Miss Thomas 
iare spoken. Finally the President of the Senior Class steps forward. 
She is going to present the gift of the student body to the School. 

The rector accepts it and again the room is filled with applause. Dur- 
ing the commotion several girls are seen to slip away through the side 
door. More songs are sung. The Juniors glance at the piano and 
imagine how they will feel standing there next year. The Sophomores, 



The St. Mary's jYIuse 




Class Day, 1915. The Procession froii "East Rock." 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



he Freshman and even the "little Preps" cast wistful glances at the 
■Seniors. And the Seniors themselves ? They are not so happy as the 
hthers may think. To them this seems the beginning of the end. They 
1 ook with envy upon the lucky ones who will have more School Parties 
lb attend. How gladly would they exchange jnaces with them tonight. 

And now the girls who slipped away are soming back with plates of 
ce cream and little cakes. Conversation and laughter begin in earnest 
ind a jolly time they all have until suddenly a chord is struck on the 
oiano. All spring to their feet for it is "Alma Mater." 

"St. Mary's, whever thy daughters may be — " 

Fresh voices filled with a new love and reverence, happy voices tinged 
row with the sorrow of coming partings. Slowly the last note dies 
away. There is a hush and a pause. Tears are in many eyes, every- 
one is loath to go. And then the light flashes. Slowly, reluctantly the 
marls drift out of the parlor and the School Party is over. 

Annie S. Cameron. 1915. 



Class Day 

The Muse Room is indeed a scene of confusion. Everywhere heaps 
of daises, balls of twine and merry groups of girls. The Juniors have 
been up since five o'clock and under their hands the long daisy chain is 
striding foot by foot towards completion. That was before breakfast 
and now it is nearly half past ten and the arrangements in the grove are 
almost completed. A last touch is given to. the green arch built over the 
main walk and two or three girls drag out two or three more cushions 
land benches. Some one hurries by with an armful of flowers. She is 
ion her way to the studio where great preparations are being made for the 
'Art Exhibit which is to take place in the afternoon. 

From the distance comes the faint sound of singing. The Seniors 
are practicing over for the last time their various class songs. And now 
it is almost eleven o'clock. Visitors are beginning to drift into the 
grove, — mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, relatives and friends — until the 
benches are overflowing and the grove is bright with happy faces. 



29 



The St. Mary's Muse 




Class Day, 1915. The Seniors with the Daisy Chain. 



flK^" W'? s'kP^P^^' * 









Class Day. 1915. The Procession of the Lower Classes Around "West Rock." 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Suddenly the sunny calm of the May morning is broken by clear 
fresh voices singing: 

"In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees, 
Where the sunlight lies — " 

Around the corner of West Rock winds a long line, white clad. The 
Preps come first, then the Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors. The 
long line parts and down the center, led by the Chief Marshal, and bear- 
ing the daisy chain, come the Seniors. Down the midst of the long line 
they march and to the platform to the semi-circle of chairs awaiting 
them. The other classes file by, still singing, and take their places. Then 
a hush falls over the grove. The President of the Senior Class is speak- 
ing. She is welcoming the many guests. As the applause dies away 
the Preps rise to sing their class song. They are followed by the Fresh- 
men, the Sophomores and the Juniors. Finally comes the Senior Class 
Song. Then the class roll is called and the Seniors one by one answer 
"Present" for the last time at a class gathering. The History and the 
Prophecy follow and the "Last Will and Testament," calling forth peals 
of laughter at its ridiculous bequests. Another hush falls over the 
grove. A girl has stepped forward, the Business Manager of the Muse. 
She is going to present the annual and no one but the Seniors know to 
whom it is dedicated. There is a moment of tense listening and then 
what a storm of applause. Evidently the choice of the Senior Class 
is the choice of the School as well. Suddenly a chord is struck on the 
piano. All spring to their feet, at the sound of "Alma Mater." Slowly 
the last note dies away. There is a moment's pause, a moment's hush 
and then — the President steps down from the platform and Class Day 
exercises are over. Annie g> Camekox . 1915> 

Commencement 

At last it is over, the Salutatory, the Class Essay, the Commence- 
ment Address, the honors and promotions, and the Valedictory all are 
over and the long line is wending its way to Chapel. At the door the 
Chief Marshal turns and divides the line, the Juniors at the head, the 
Preps at the foot, and down this avenue of girls come the Choir, the 
Trustees, and lastly the Seniors led by the Chief Marshal. "Ten 
3 




Commencement. 1915. The Student Procession, Headed by the Marshals. 

"We're the happiest girls in all the realm of schooldom, 
We feel as though we'd triumphed over fate, 

We've reached a goal we've ever sought, 

A day of which we've ever thought, 

That wondrous day on which we graduate. 

And so it's all come true as in a story, 

Commencement morning with its golden sun 

Has risen upon our sight in all its glory. 
For us there'll never be such other one. 

And yet we say with heartfelt sigh 

For the happy days of the years gone by: 

Good-bye, School, we're through, 

Dear School, where we have met, 
We say gcod-bye to you 

With very real regret. 
Our day of jubilation 
Is full of fascination, 

But we'll e'er to you be true; 
Good-bye, School, 

Good-bye, School, we're through. 

From "Goocl-bye, School, We're Through" (a song of Graduation Day, 
after "Good-bye. Girls," from "Chin Chin") 






The St. Mary's Muse 35 



Thousand Times Ten Thousand" the clear voices ring out triumphantly 
— everybody is singing. 

Prayers, lessons and Psalms follow each other. To others it may 
seem the usual Commencement Service, but not to that little group for 
whom this celebration is being held, that group in whose lives this marks 
the first crisis. If you are one of that group it is very different. You 
kneel, and sit, and stand as in a dream. You go forward when your 
name is called. The Bishop is speaking to yon, he is handing you some- 
thing, your diploma. Pour years of work for this. Did you ever 
Imagine you could be so miserable? Four years, and it seems only a 

i moment. You would give anything to go over it again. But there is 
an indescribable thrill as it touches your hand, this bit of paper that 
means so much to you. Then follow a few words by the Bishop and you 
are back again in your seat. 

A prayer, the final benediction, and then the organ peals forth "Jeru- 

: salem, High Tower." The line is filing out again. A sudden terror 

■ seizes you. You want to catch the flying moments and hold them fast. 
Through the numbing pain that you are suffering flashes the thought 

I that this is the last time you will march out of St. Mary's Chapel, "a 
girl." You would give anything to turn back, to be a Freshman, a 
Prep, but the line moves on and you are out again in the dazzling sun- 
shine, on around the path to join the long semicircle that stretches from 
West to East Pock. Slowly the Clergy and Trustees file past and there 
falls a sudden silence. The Chief Marshal steps forward. There is a 

i moment's pause, a moment's hush, and then — she raises her hand and 
your life at St. Mary's is ended. Aknie s< Qamebon. 1915. 




I 



36 The St. Mary's Muse 



Hail, St. Mary's 

In a grove of stately oak trees, 

Where the sunlight lies, 
Stands St. Mary's true and noble, 

'Neath the southern skies. 

Par and wide, oh sound her praises, 

Chorus full and free, 
Hail, St. Mary's, Alma Mater, 

Hail, all hail to thee! 

Well we love the little chapel, 

Ever hold it dear; 
Hear the echoes of the music, 

Rising soft and clear. 
Far and wide, etc. 

There the ivy and the roses 

Climb the old stone wall, 
There the sweet, enticing bird-notes 

Sound their magic call. 
Far and wide, etc. 

And the bonds of friendship strengthen 

As her beauties charm, 
We draw close to Alma Mater, 
Trust her guiding arm. 
Far and wide, etc. 

After Makgaret Mason Young. 1898. 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 

EVERY DAY SKETCHES 



Saturday Evening 

Choir practice is over at last and the girls in pretty dresses troop 
into study hall for assembly. A few "harmonize" softly on the melody 
of the last hymn. After assembly, over in East Rock, and far out the 
door the line extends, waiting for mail. It is a jolly, good-natured 
line tonight. Some sing; others beat time on the backs of the unfor- 
tunates who happen to be in front of them ; others make would-be witty 
remarks about those who pass them, coming from the office. 

A girl with a worried look pushes through the crowd with a mur- 
mured "Beg pardon, but I must get to " 

But it's: 

"Oh ! No you don't ! We're on to your tricks and you don't pass 
us." 

"Well, it's past my understanding why you should object," 

The crowd emits a groan of anguish and the disturber of the peace 
subsides. 

From the parlor comes the sound of "rag-time." They are dancing 
over there. 

"Oh ! Pink ! give me the third ?" 

"Got it ! Sorry, but I can't help being popular. The fourth ?" 

"Good!" 

It is a very pretty sight. They all dance well. You notice one 

couple that dance especially so. Another couple are trying a new step 

1 with tolerable success, and considerable laughter. Over in one corner 

i stands a bright-eyed girl who is evidently a favorite, for the "Preps" 

• surrounding her are squabbling for dances with her. 

Somebody suggests a figure, and the crowd falls in with alacrity. 

By the door, the "Lady of the rTight" bustles busily, searching for 
■ some lass for whom the inevitable Saturday night "suitor" waits ; while 
: the timid-looking suitor sits gingerly on a bench in the school-room and 
toys with his hat. 

In the school-room there is a busy murmur of conversation, broken 
sometimes by light laughter. There are a number of boys and girls in 






38 



The St. Mary's Muse 




Tile St. Mary's Musk 39 



the room, each couple seated at a separate desk and obviously oblivious 
of the presence of the others. But at the clang of the ''big bell" the 
f suitors" reluctantly depart, 

Sunday Morning 

The little maples by tbe path, rustle their red-gold leaves and grow 
more brilliant in the soft sunshine of Indian Summer, and the pillars 
of the big porch gleam white against the dull red of Main Building. 

A group of girls are lounging idly on the broad steps. Some one 
murmurs the opening lines of tbe collect for the day, and the crowd 
takes it up, chanting in sing-song fashion, then relapses into its former 
tranquility. They watch the girls scattered over the grove or the squir- 
rel that works busily, or survey with tranquil satisfaction their own 
carefully manicured nails, and drowsy in the warm sunshine rest silent, 
idly content. 

Off somewhere a whistle sounds, a window is raised, a head is thrust 
out, and, 

"Hello! In a minute," and the window bangs shut again. 

A girl comes out of East Rock, her arms full of yellow chrysanthe- 
mums. The crowd hums, "Here comes the bride," and laughs. Some 
one jumps up from the steps, and leaving the crowd lazily protesting at 
the disturbance, runs down to the girl with the flowers, throws an arm 
around her shoulders, and they go over to chapel together. 

Over at the chapel people are busy. Chapel is the heart of the 
place. They are dressing the altar with chrysanthemums. The or- 
ganist is playing the Processional over softly, and two girls are collect- 
ing the hymnals. Miss Katie is there. 

******* 

The evening service, the sweetest service of all, is ending. The Re- 
cessional is "The Son of God goes forth to war," and everybody sings. 
After supper people drift into the parlor, and into the schoolroom 
to write letters. Out on the porch the moonlight is very bright and 
the stars are crisp and clear. In the parlor some one with a very sweet 
voice is singing the "Song of the Soul," and you sit in the shadow of a 
column with your arms around your best friend and think, and don't 
say much. 



40 The St. Mary's Muse 

After a time some one comes out and suggests ghost stories in the 
parlor with the lights out, and you go in. 

Pretty soon you find that you and the crowd around are the only 
ones that are left in the parlor. So the crowd rises slowly, yawns, and 
disperses. 

Monday Morning 

Monday morning ! In the alcove by Miss Thomas's door, the crowd 
of girls wait their turn, chatting in subdued voices. The floor is 
strewn with scraps of yellow permit blanks. Over in one corner some 
one is writing out a permission, using a friend's back as a prop. 
The office door opens, the girl comes out, radiant, and dances down 
the hall ; then another emerges, and disappears with a tearful look. 

Out in front of the Main Building the "Preps" are collecting, wait- 
ing for the chaperone to take them "down-town." 

In twos and threes the other girls come; leave their permissions with 
the "Lady of the Day" who sits sewing in the corner of the big, sunny 
porch, and with a swish of skirts, and clink of silver bags, hurry down- 
town to "Cally's" and ice cream. 

Scattered about the grove are the other girls — some "uniting," some 
working busily over books or papers, others merely lounging idly, 
watching the departing crowds. 

A clatter of hoofs, and the horses for the Riding Club appear. Then 
girls come out of different buildings in varied riding attire, and the 
loungers in the grove settle themselves for another hour to watch the 
mounting. But at last they are off, and the solitary Senior on the 
steps of the Art Building turns again to her Current History; and the 
red-headed wood-pecker flies back to his drumming on a tree from 
which the horses in passing had frightened him. 



Just Any Winter Morning 

"Oh the bell, bell, bell, 
Hear it clang and crash and roar, 
What a horror does outpour 
On the bosom of the palpitating air." 

We will have to apologize to Poe. but this is exactly the way the rising 
;ell sounds when its never failing peals disturb the blissful dreams of 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 



I the St. Mary's girls at the "absolutely unearthly" hour of seven. The 

i catalogue does not know how wrong it is when it states in flaring letters 

that the girls rise at seven o'clock, and have breakfast at seventy thirty. 

It never occurs to any one to get up when the rising bell rings. Then 

you just yell to your roommate, "Wake up! The bell's rung and it's 

j your morning to pull down the window," and soon a sleepy voice cries 

;' "It's not, you know I put it down yesterday — oh why did you wake me 

j up ?" Then you both turn over for just one more nap, and quiet reigns 

i at St. Mary's for about a quarter of an hour longer. Then sleepy 

heads are popped out of doors with cries of "What time is it ?" "How 

| long since the bell rang?" "Oh, I'm so sleepy I can't get up." From 

then until seven-thirty the St. Mary's girl works harder than any other 

time, trying to do in ten minutes what it takes an hour at home to do. 

There are mad cries of "Please give me the shoe-buttoner." "O dear — 

what am I going to do? There is not a single hairpin in this room." 

"Oh, there goes the bell. Please button my dress." "I don't know 

} where my hair ribbon is." "Oh I know I'm not going to get there, and 

I've been late twice this week already." 

A mad rush for the dining room follows the ringing of the bell, and 
I then the doors are closed, shutting out those who were just too sleepy to 
i get up. Julia Washington Allex. 1913. 



Getting the Mail 

"Why does Miss T- — insist on making us stay in here all this time, 
just because some cue made a little noise ?" whispers some one in the back 
of the schoolroom, at assembly from chapel. How can she have the 
heart to make us wait in here, when she sees our looks of longing and 
anxiety only "to get our mail ?" Soon, however, the "spirit moves her," 
and she taps the bell. My ! Such a hustle to get there first ! Anyone 
in the way between Main Building and East Rock doesn't have to be told 
to move aside. 

"I wish those girls wouldn't push through the line to see if they have 
any mail. Why don't they get in line and go around ?" 

"That's what I say, Katherine ; think of the time they'd save. And 
all those toes that are stepped on would be spared ! It frets me no lit- 
tle," murmurs Janie, as she settles back against the wall. 



42 



The St. Maey's Muse 




The Dramatic Club in "The Adventure of Lady Ursula." 




The Chorus Class on the Auditorium Steps. 



The St. Maby's Muse 43 



"Oh, you Tudger' ! I don't think it's fair to save places! She cer- 
tainly ought to run for herself," whispers Xellie in a lower tone to the 
girl in front of her. 

How slowly the line moves ! It seems as if I'll never get to the win- 
dow. "What ?" mumbles Sallie, "Do you mean to say I haven't any 
mail today, either ; I guess everybody has forgotten me. I didn't ex- 
pect to hear from home, as there's no one there except mother and 
father. They never write me unless somebody gets married or dies ; 
and there's not much danger of their 'retying the knot' !" And Sallie 
slowly makes her way out of East Rock. 

"What's the matter up there? Everybody buying stamps? Well, I 
might have known it. I'll declare! I have three whole letters; and 
I've been waiting back yonder all this time ! But here I am at last. 
177, Miss Sutton, please." Elizabeth Anderson Tarey. 1913. 



The Usual Occurrence at Lunch Period 
Oh, dear ! How inuch more time have we before the bell ? I'll de- 
clare we certainly ought to have more than fifteen minutes at this lunch 
period. I never know whether I'm coming or going, for I'm always in 
such a hurry and rush. How some people find time to stroll around 
the grove now is beyond me But I know they must be the unfortu- 
nate ones who never get any mail! Isn't it just too provoking? The 
mail never gets here in the morning before chapel time any more, and 
there is always such a mob over at the office at lunch that I never can 
get mine. And then, too, I never have time to read all my numer- 
ous ( ?) letters in just fifteen minutes ! The bell always rings for class 
when I'm in the most thrilling part. 

And I always have something "most important" to tell some one at 
this time, and I never can find them, of course. By the time I chase 
a girl all over this place, and go from Miss Shattuck's dormitory to 
Senior Hall searching for her, why I have entirely forgotten what I had 
to tell her. Oh yes ! I forgot that permission ! I knew I had some- 
thing on my mind. I forgot to file my permission to go out this after- 
noon, and now I'm afraid it's too late. However, I'll be brave and try. 
Where is a pencil ? Dear me ! I never can find a thing when I get in 
a hurry. For mercy's sake, somebody lend me a pencil ! 



44 



The St. Mary's Muse 




The St. Mary's Muse 45 



And I did want to find time to glance over my lesson before class. 
Of course I'll get a question in the part I haven't looked at: Guess 
I'd better study a little. Goodness gracious! ! Yon can't mean that's 
the bell already ! Here I have been sitting down talking away so fast 
that I haven't done a single one of the many things that I was just 
obliged to do. And I don't even know where my book is ! I simply 
must find it, as I went to class yesterday without it and got reported. 
I see now where I get late today. "To get late" or "to go to class with- 
out a book," that is the question ! ! 

Mary Brown Buteee. 1.913. 



"Unit-ing" 

(AFTER KEATS.) 

Oh, what can ail thee, little maid 
Alone and slowly sauntering? 

Thou has a most unhappy look, 
Poor little thing! 

Ah, what can ail thee, little maid? 

So wistful and so woe-begone? 
A better time will surely come, 

Unhappy one! 

I heard this morn a dreadful thing. 

The Rector said in study hall 
That beauty without exercise — 

No go at all. 

The "L. P." also had her say: 

That exercise henceforth would be 

(As idle moments here abound) 
Compulsory. 

So, though I much prefer to read 
In some sequestered, quiet nook, 

Avowals of undying love 
In some sweet book; 

Or rather to the grill room go, 
And with my friends select and few 

There with much merriment prepare 
A candy stew. 



46 



The St. Maky's Muse 




C**,".._'- 



•.-.>■*:.- 



The Walking Cxtjb ox the East Campus. 



The St. Mary's Muse 47 



Yet must I face the cutting wind 
This bitter cold December day, 

And here, though almost frozen — pace 
The hours away. 



So this is why I wander here 

With faltering steps and many sighs, 
Because nine "units" I must check 

Of exercise. Neix battle Lewis. 1910. 



A May Afternoon 

The grove is silent and the tall trees seem to be waiting for some 
one to come and wake them. They do not wait in vain, for a bell is 
ringing and out of all the buildings come pouring many girls. Now 
the trees are awake, and with the rustling of their leaves they call to 
the girls to come and sit beneath their shade. 

"Oh, Margaret, please bring me my sewing when you come out, as I 
have to write now." 

"Oh, all right, Mary, I have to go to gym. first, but then we can sew 
until time to dress for dinner." 

Many girls drift into the grove and settle down to finish embroider- 
ing the things they are making for their friends who are to graduate 
in a few weeks. Soon a crowd gathers on the benches under an old 
oak and at once some one suggests singing. And as their needles fly 
they sing, "In the Evening by the Moonlight," or "Mobile Bay" and 
many others ; but they come back again to these first two because Sarah 
and Julia can sing such good tenor. 

"Oh, I can sing fine tenor to 'O You Beautiful Doll,' " and so Cather- 
ine starts the tune and the rest take it up until toward the end Sarah 
comes in with her tenor. 

"Oh, girls, let me tell you something grand," cries Elizabeth as she 
rushes breathlessly up to the group, "Brother is here and he is coming 
out to see me." 

"Please give him our best, oh ! somebody please go and see who has 
any express. I see the wagon coming into the grove." 

"I have finished my scalloping," says Bessie, "and so I'll go and if 
any of you get boxes or candy, I'll take them and eat them all by 
myself." 



48 The St. Mary's Muse 



"Oil, that's agreeable to us if you will only go and see if we've got 
any." 

And off she goes toward East Rock. 

"Oh, Julia," she yells from the door after a minute, "you have 
some candy, and please come and get it." 

And Julia runs — no she flies, to the office and emerges a few minutes 
later with a big box of candy. 

"Oh, hurry, don't walk so slow, Julia, for we are about to die for 
some Suets.' " 

Then comes quiet for awhile as the girls eat and sew. 

The big bell is ringing and some of the girls reluctantly rise and tread 
their weary way to detention and after they have gone the rest settle 
down to really sew, but soon the crowd starts thinning, for some must 
go and dress and write before dinner. JSTow the five-thirty bell rings 
and the last reluctant one leaves to dress for dinner. 

The old trees do not have time to go to sleep again as in a few min- 
utes girls start coming out from all of the buildings in white and light 
colors and they stroll slowly around the grove. Some go into East 
Rock to see if the afternoon mail is up. And others, as they walk are 
looking at the glorious sunset. Some one starts singing: 

"The sun is sinking fast 
The daylight dies." 

But now the dinner bell rings and the girls go toward Clement 
Hall. 

Again the trees are still and a gentle breeze stirs the leaves and 
again all is quiet and the old trees that have watched over young girls 
for almost a century stand quiet as sentinels. 

Caroline Clarke Jokes. 1913 



The St. Mary's Muse 



41.) 



The Line as Seen by the Chapel OaK 

Have you ever seen that Chapel Line at St. Mary's? I have watched 
it for many, many years, and the thing that strikes me most is the effect 
that the months and certain days have on the expression of that line's 
faces. September is a horrible month for the poor Chapel Line's faces. 
They are all swollen and sometimes they are really bedewed with tears. 
But in November the tears are cleared away and the line is wreathed 
with smiles, and when 'December comes that line fairly radiates with 
happiness — now isn't that queer ? 

On Sundays the line appears most dressed up. It is both gloved and 
hatted. It carries itself with the greatest of dignity and is even led by 
the Minister himself. 

It has always been hard for me to decide whether that line appeals to 
me more on that early Easter morning when it is all clad in white and 
seems so joyous and jubilant, or whether it is dearer to me on that glad, 
sad Commencement Day, when part of it leaves me forever — perhaps it is 
then. Such choking thoughts rise up in my limbs — to think that some of 
the dear faces that are passing, that I have seen daily for so many years, 
I may never see again. 

And so it is — that line with time goes on forever: each year taking 
away old faces from my sight yet quickly adding new ones which do not 
always take the places of those gone before. 

Alice Co tin Latham. 1916. 




50 The St. Mary's Muse 



A Little Song 

(Tune: Uncle Ned.) 

I will sing a little song, 

Which shall not be very long, 
All about the sweet St. Maryites; 

Some sober, and some gay, 

Some with nothing much to say, 
And some prepared to set the world to rights! 

Chorus: 

those dear St. Mary's girls, 

With their graces and their curls, 
How delectable, detestable they are! 

Their dresses and their hats, 

And their funny little spats! 
You will hardly find their equal near or far! 

Ah, they study very hard, 

And they work and toil and plod, 
Each ready for the teacher's beck and call; 

But some there are who state — 

('Tis a wonder to relate) — 
There's a girl or two who studies not at all! 

Chorus. 

There's a college, I would say, 

Not a half a mile away, 
That educates entrancing little boys; 

And when life seems rather dry, 

And the time goes crawling by — 
On Saturdays they serve as charming toys! 

Chorus. 

Now of course it's understood 

That these girls are very good, 
But the teachers just occasionally find 

To restrict a litte bit, 

In detention hall to sit, 
Are attentions they consider very kind. 

Chorus. 

If you take them all and all, 

From the Dorms to Senior Hall, 
And weigh them in the balance carefully, 

You really might do worse — 

To be very short and terse — 
They absolutely suit me to a tee! 



Chorus. 
After "Chaw Shi." 1913 



The St. Mary's Muse 51 



St. Mary's Down in Dixie 

(tune: dixie.) 

Down in the South in the land of cotton, 
Dear old school not a bit forgotten, 

Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 
For St. Mary's dear we'll never fear, 
The thought of her brings only cheer, 

Hooray, hooray! hooray for dear 
St. Mary's! 

St. Mary's, yes, great place for schoolin', 
Where you work and play and do some foolin' 
Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 

Chorus. 

E. A. P.'s or Sigma Lambda's, 
Alpha Rho's or Namby-Pamba's 

Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 

Chorus. 

We're sometimes Sigma's, sometimes Mus's, 
Whatever we are you'll please excuse us, 
Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 

Chorus. 



52 The St. Mary's Muse 



ST. MARY'S— MY ARRIVAL fJND MY DEPARTURE 



There are two ways of looking at everything, I've been told, and 
though J believe there are many exceptions to this rule, I think it is 
true of the ways in which I've looked at St. Mary's: that is, the way I 
looked at it on the night of my arrival three years ago, and the way I 
looked at it to-day, when for the last time as a school-girl, I drove out 
of the Grove. 

Long ago, as we rolled up Ilillsboro Street, I stretched my neck out 
of the carriage window and stared into the mysterious blackness, which 
a distant flood of light from all the windows of St. Mary's seemed to 
make more oppressive. I thought I was going to suffocate as we came 
closer and closer, and the full glare of light was worse than the dark- 
ness. All too soon the carriage came to a stand-still in front of the 
Main Building and I grew rather choky and huddled against my 
father. Countless heads bobbed out of the windows and a myriad of 
eyes were turned upon us. As we went up the steps I saw, through the 
mass of heads in the windows to the right, a room full of girls, dancing 
in bewildering haste. Just then several couples left off and rushed out 
on the porch, and I was hugged breathlessly, dashed through an in- 
troduction, to some thirty girls and told to "come on and see how grand 
the room looks." 

Vaguely I felt my father kissing me, but before I could secure him 
he had disappeared, so I moved on between my muslin-clad, chattering 
room-mates-to-be, feeling very dusty and curious. "Isn't is simply 
great? and we've got more Turkish trophies — look out! you're sitting 
on the cake." 

T immediately left off sitting on the cake, which, by the way, was 
secluded under a mound of pillows; and tried to look entirely at home 
and to discover the charms of the perfectly bare room. I thought 
maybe they were joking, but I'd been told whatever happened, never to 
be "fresh," so I simply said, "Yes, it's lovely," and wondered to myself 
why all the furniture should be in a clump in the middle of the floor, 
and how we were to sleep on bare mattresses. This latter fear was 
soon allayed, for one of my roommates began : "You see, we didn't 
have time to make up beds after we did all the rest," (the "rest" con- 



The St. Mary's Muse 53 



sisted in opening the trunks and rooting out the cake) "so we might as 
well do it now, then we can go dance. Here, kid, take these sheets ; 
don't guess jour trunks will get up to-night." I grasped the bed linen 
thrown at me and approached the bed pointed out. This was a hor- 
rible ordeal! I'd meant to practice bed-making before leaving home, 
but somehow I'd forgotten to. I hoped my ignorance was not being- 
laid bare before these girls and under cover of the continuous conver- 
sation that they kept up I trotted from one side of that bed to the other, 
trying to pull the sheet smooth. I thought I was progressing neatly 
when I heard a snicker behind me followed by convulsive giggles. 
Then I was pushed aside and told to cut the cake, I'd find a shoe-horn 
on the dresser. I seemed to take to shoe-horning cake less awkwardly, 
and by the time the others had finished my bed, I had two nice chunks 
ready for them. I was very grateful to them for making my bed and 
overcome with admiration at the rapidity with which they had accom- 
plished it. Later on my gratitude and admiration sunk very low, for 
"Pie-beds," it is needless to say to those who've had experience, 
deserve neither. But my room-mates didn't seem to resent any lack 
of thanks in the least. Late into the night my meditations as to how 
long it would be before I could leave this big, bare place and be home 
again were interrupted by spasmodic chuckles and shrieks from the 
other beds. 

And that was three years ago ! Three years is quite a long time 
but everything looked so different this morning, it doesn't seem as if it 
could have been the same place. Perhaps it was because long ago I 
saw it at night and to-day in the morning, sunshine. Put I hardly 
think so. It was not the sunlight or the flowers that made the place so 
lovely. I can't tell exactly what it was. But as I stood on the carriage 
step, clinging in a lasting good-bye to those same room-mates who had 
shown themselves such expert makers of Pie-beds that first night, all of 
us suffering a mutual case of suffocation, I forgot all about the joy of 
going home and of being free. I just wanteel to stumble up those old 
Main Building steps, late to roll-call, and once more to accomplish the 
feat of plunging in the schoolroom, just as my name was called. I 
would have endured the agony of not getting any mail, and delightedly 
have gotten into line for chapel and progressed funereally out again. 



54 The St. Mary's Muse 



Walking hour seemed a pleasure; I would willingly have walked 
round and round thai grove until I was dizzy. 

And oh ! for the joy of dancing once more on the parlor floor — to be 
once more a man ! 

If I might again brave Miss ■ and rush spasmodically up and 

down East Rock Hall in order to get the ice out of the cooler for lemon- 
ade or some such refreshment ! 

Once more to be awaked by the dulcet tones of "A's and M's" in a 
well-meant serenade ! 

In drowning, it is said a man's whole life flashes before his eyes. So 
at leaving did the life at St. Mary's whirl before me, and I looked with 
envy on those younger ones who would return to do as I was wont to 
do. 

But Raleigh hackmen are not given to indulging sentiment, so I was 
forced to wrench myself from my room-mates and with a last desperate 
good-bye to the crowd of girls, every one of whom I had been thrown 
with in one way or another, I was gone from St. Mary's. 

Helen Steaxge. 1907. 

farewell, St. Mary's 

There have been times in the past, we know, 
When we eagerly longed for that happy day 

Toward which all our toils and labors go, 
When with home-turned faces we could say, 
"Farewell, St. Mary's!" 

But now as the day draws swiftly near 

There comes another feeling, too. 
Somehow everything seems more dear 

When it's being taken away from you — 
"Farewell, St. Mary's!" 

St. Mary's! What volumes in that one name! 

It has been our very life in the past, 
To many more it will be the same — ■ 

But — our final parting has come at last! 
"Farewell, St. Mary's!" 

We are leaving the days of our school life behind — 

Yes, with all their hearty endeavor. 
Before us untrodden our life-path winds, 

As we say, perhaps forever — 

"Farewell, St. Mary's!" M. R. DuBose. 1905. 



Tile St. Mary's Muse 55 



St. Mary's riyrnn 

(Music by R. Blinn Owen. 1913.) 

Come one and all, your voices lend; 

In radiant tones our hymn we raise 
To Alma Mater's glory, spend 

Our every effort for her praise. 
With glowing hearts we view these walls, 

To them our girlhood mem'ries cling; 
You campus green and well-loved halls, 

To you our grateful hymn we sing. 

Hail, hail, contant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 

We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 

Dear Alma Mater, praise we bring 

For friendships nurtured at your side; 
No dearer, sweeter ties will cling 

To any hearts than here abide. 
Inspired by you our thoughts enfold 

A larger aim. In all you've seemed 
To guide our steps, our lives to mould 

To nobler things we had not dreamed. 

Hail, hail, constant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 
We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 



56 The St. Mary's Muse 



When School Days at Last Have Been Ended 
(after kiplixg.) 

When school days at last have been ended, 

And the big world we take as our stage; 
When the Book of Life's open before ns, 

And we tremblingly turn the first page, 
We shall pause for a while in the turning — 

Drift back for a moment in dreams, 
Till the light of our love for St. Mary's 

Surrounds us with soft shining beams. 

We shall see all our days there transfigured, 

Recalled in our vision serene. 
The whole as a precious fabric, 

With friendship and love for its sheen; 
The dream pictures, books, and our lessons 

As values not trivial nor small, 
But the bonds of our faith in St. Mary's — 

The force that had strength above all. 

As onward we go in the future — 

Awake from our dream of the past — 
We will carry St. Mary's traditions 

Wherever our lot may be cast; 
And no one shall falter, shall waver, 

But bravely walking afar 
We shall guide our course by her teachings 

As the mariner follows the star. 

The Annual Muse. 1912. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price ,,,,,,.,, One Dollar. 

Single Copies - Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 
in the interest of the students and Alumna?, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mary A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberly Bourne, '16 \ n , ,•_„„ M „ 
Fannie Marie Stallings, '16 ) Busln ess Managers 



THE SOUVENIR MUSES 



This "School Life N umber" is the second of two souvenir numbers of 
the monthly Muse, which have been planned and in course of prepara- 
tion for several years. The first of these numbers — the "Tenth Anni- 
versary Number," appeared last May. 

The "Anniversary Number" was intended to remind those interested 
of the passing of the tenth milestone since the Muse was reestablished in 
September, 1904, and to recall some of the more typical of the contribu- 
tions that had been published in the Muse during those ten years by re- 
publishing them. The ''School Life Number" is an attempt to collect 
together for the first time descriptions of some of the life and occasions of 
interest at St. Mary's which recur from year to year in such way as to be 
of continuous interest to St. Mary's girls of all years. Nell Battle 
Lewis, '11, the Editor-in-Chief and chief spirit of the Muse in her Senior 
year, was the originator of the idea, and her "Every Day Sketches" were 
a feature of the 1910-'ll Muse. To Annie Sutton Cameron, this year's 
Editor, it has fallen to write the necessary sketches to make the account 
of the year reasonably complete, and they are one further evidence of the 



58 The St. Mary's Muse 

devoted service which has characterized her four years at St. Mary's. 
The two Muses combined are a further ''souvenir" in recalling espe- 
cially those whose writings have served to make the Muse what it has 
been. "Margaret DuBose," "Helen Strange," "Helen Liddell," "Serena 
Bailey," 1 "Ida Rogerson and Mary Shuford," "Virginia Pickel," "Trma 
Deaton," "Margaret Broadfoot," "Xell Lewis," "Patsy Smith," and 
"Annie Cameron," have not been alone in their aid to the Muse, and 
many of those who have taken less conspicuous parts are worthy of equal 
recognition ; but the work of all who have worked is worthy of recollec- 
tion, and it is a pleasure to remind them and all others interested that 
they are not forgotten and are still to be a help and stimulus to their 
younger sisters who are working in the present and those who shall work 
in the future. E. C. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 

I readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 

principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 

' them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 

I it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



The Eighteenth Volume of the 

ANNUAL MUSE 

will be ready May 22, 1916. 

$3 the copy. 
Subscriptions are invited. 



The Dobbin-Ferratl Go. 

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Advertisements 



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THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 
are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views. 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

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Ask the Girls 



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Advertisements 



Ctationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

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Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything upto date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 







THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumna'- Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A f ate which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining' place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 


HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phcnes 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone P23 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Kevs. Bicvcle Supplies. 
• 
Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 


PESCUD'S BOOK STOKE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


HOTEL GIERSCH 
RALEIGH. X. C. 


W. E. BOWEB 
Shoe Repairing: 



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at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
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& Co. 

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WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 



Company 



Steel Die ami Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 






Advertise m en ts 



THE YARBOROUGH 

Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



tinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



lolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



28 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



1 WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

i 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

(RIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Wat«*r Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 0. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills . 

PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 
California Fruit Store, 111 Fayctteville St.. Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 

Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 

HATES & HALL— STUDIO 



The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-W ear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 

MISCES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY J_ 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALRTGH. N C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 

EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KIXSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va, 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. C. 







t jfWarp'* ffluxt 

fcaletfif), Jfc C. 



Spring Jlumber 

iSlpril, 1916 



SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1916 



Thursday, March 23 
Thursday, March 30 
Thursday, April 6 
Sunday, April 9 
Thursday, April 13 
Monday, April 10 



Sunday, 
Friday, 
Sunday, 
Monday, 



April 16 
April 21 
April 23 
April 24 



Saturday, April 29 
Monday, May 1 
Wednesday, May 3 

Saturday, May 6 



Monday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 

Monday, 



May 8 

May 11 

May 12 

May 13 

May 15 

May 16-18 

May 18-20 

May 20-22 



ApriMJTay 

Pupils' Organ Recital. Chapel. 5:00 p.m. 

Ce ASLl e . c T2^ iano - Miss Martha Wri ^- 

C "hap C eT S^ofpV* ^^^ MiSS H6len Wright - 

An t?o U n al VSSS^k^ BiSh ° P ' and Rite of Confirma- 
tion. cnapel. 5:00 p.m. 

Certificate Recital in Elocution. Miss Jane Norman 
Auditorium. 8:00 pm 

In J e o" ft Society Shakespearian Contest. Auditorium. 
i . ov p.m. 

Palm Sunday. 

Good Friday. Holy Day. 

Easter Day. 

Easter Monday. Easter Egg Hunt. Grove. 7:00 p.m. 

Junior-Senior "Banquet." Muse Room. 8:00 p.m. 

Shakesperian Festival. 8:15 p.m. 

Certificate Recital" in Voice. Miss Martha Wright 
Auditorium. 8:30 p.m. 8 l ' 

Fifth Annual "School Party." Parlor. 8:00 p.m. 

Diploma Recital in Piano. Miss Mary Flovd Audi 

torium. 8:30 p.m. 

Certificate Recital in Elocution. Miss Lois Push 

Auditorium. 8:15 p.m. 8fll 

A St m Mlir?'s y " ?4th Anniversar y of the Opening of 
Annual Chorus RecitaL Auditorium. 8:30 p.m. 

Diploma Recital in Piano. Miss Helen Wright Audi- 
torium. 8:30 p.m. s ' AUQ1 
Senior Examinations. 

Final Examinations. 

Commencement Season. 



EDWARDS a BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH. N. C 



The St. Mary's Muse 

SPRING NUMBER 



April, 1916 No.-G-^ 



Spring 



Annie Sutton Cameron, '16. 

Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again! 
With the earth awaking gladly, 
And the birds rejoicing madly, 

In the day-dawn after night. 
Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again — and Light! 

Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again! 
With its wonders and its thrill 
Over meadow, vale and hill, 

With its vigor and its strife. 
Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again — and Life. 

Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again! 
And the orchards breathe perfume, 
Meadows faint with clover bloom, 

As the blue sky laughs above. 
Spring, Spring, Spring! 

Spring again — and Love! 



Fate 

Edith Blodgett. 

Hang it ! Why were people always pairing unmarried young men 
off? 

Jack Travis sighed despairingly as he snapped the Pullman cur- 
tain down full length and settled hack lazily into the green plush 
chair. He was a good-looking young man, as young men go ; lean of 



154 The St. Mary's Muse. 



frame, broad-shouldered and tanned with outdoor living ; a strong, d 
termined face lit up with a pair of deeply shaded brown eyes pc 
sessing the very merriest of twinkles, and a straight mouth, surpr} 
ing one with its almost girlish dimple at the corner. So really pc 
turbed he was at this moment that an ominous frown had darkenc 
his eyes, still more ominous, indeed, for his match-making aunt, t 
ward whom every movement of the speeding train was bringing hir. 
Really, you know, this was getting to be too much of a good thins, 
this having house parties twice a year with the sole purpose of ma 
ing Jack fall sincerely in love. And the girls she chose ! Aunt Rul 
certainly had a fondness for either these heavily eye-glassed, terrii 
cally literary maidens, or sweet gushing girls without a grain of sens 
iSTow, the kind of girl that any sane young man would want to man 
would most surely possess blue eyes — as deep blue in color as tt 
sky at night, with lashes violet-black. For instance, that pair of ey( 
up at the other end of the car would exactly fit the description. ]STo | 
they seemed to laugh like summer seas, now they deepened into viole 
and when the lashes lowered and hid them from sight one wondere 
frantically how they would look at the next glimpse. Just at thi 
critical moment the owner of these eyes became uncomfortably awai 
of the young man who stared so fixedly at her. She shifted her mag; 
zine and became intensely interested in the joke column, readin 
them all over seriously and with true student-like concentration 
Then, this failing, she turned her chair about, leaving to Jack th 
view of an unsatisfying blue broadcloth back and a very pink ear, 

The pinkness of this last-named feature was some consolation t 
Jack, and for a long time the only consolation granted him. Occf 
sionally, when the color faded, he took great pleasure in calling it u 
again by a suggestive cough. 

In certain situations men's minds attain astonishing rapidity, an 
now Jack's worked like lightning. As the train drew nearer an 
nearer his destination, he found himself thoroughly in love with hi 
little blue-eyed train companion ; and he also found the thought of th 
approaching house party at Hampton, with its "love battle," exceed 
ingly distasteful to him. He was frowning again and generally look 
ing very cross, indeed, when he suddenly looked down toward th 
other end of the car, and, although the little lady's back was stil 
toward him, her face looked right up to him, her blue eyes dancin; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 155 



tnd mouth dimpling in amused laughter. He only caught a glimpse, 
towever, for the laughter changed to indignant surprise, and the face 
lisappeared. It took some minutes for the young man to realize that 
t had been a mirror. And this was after the girl had made a hurried 
•etreat, bag and baggage, from that section of the train. 

Jack waited for her to come back. They passed Hampton, and 
;till he waited, but the blue eyes did not appear again. So Jack left 
ill to the fates and got off the train at the next stop. 

******** 

His aunt met him at the door. "She is darling! absolutely dar- 
ing! Come in this minute and meet her, and, for goodness' sake, 
lon't look so cross !" He was ushered hurriedly across the big, 
jhadowy living room. He heard his aunt murmur some name, and 
le looked — down into the blue eyes of that face in the mirror. 



The Secret 



Axine Hughes. 

The wild March wind 

Is over the hills, 

Chasing the clouds from the sky. 

What is he shouting 

O'er lowlands and hills? 

Hush, now, and listen — 'tis "Daffodils," 

That joyous, triumphant, glad cry. 

The daffodils 

Give warning of Spring; 

Of buds that will soon peep out; 

Of blue birds and red 

Coming caroling. 

You ask the subject of all they sing? 

I'll whisper. Don't spread it about. 

This secret deep 

Is not a known thing 

Save to birds and each small cloud. 

I will let you in 

To this secret ring: 

Their secret — -'tis Spring! 'tis gladsome Spring! 

Alas! now I've said it aloud. 



156 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Noyes, the Out-of-Doors Poet 



Katharine W. Bourne, '16. 

Have you ever gone to sleep on a dark, drizzly night, to be awal 

ened in the morning by the call of the first bluebird? The sw(| 

music of that song, the balmy southern breeze, the bursting of t 

first tiny apple bud, all have the irresistible call of spring. It is tl 

same with the poetry of Alfred Noyes. His is the poetry of spriil 

time which has the power over man to make him remember, and I 

make him forget. Noyes expresses this call, and the influence it hj 

over all people, in his "Barrel Organ" when he says, "Come down 

Kew in lilac time, in lilac time ; it isn't far from London" ; he said 

for all people — everywhere. Just stop in your busy working Lond 

life, in the city as the sun sinks low, and you can find yourself 

Kew, in the dreamy, magic Kew of springtime. Who can igno 

that call ? The proud lady in her carriage, the beggar on the stred 

alike hear it ; and they, with "the wheeling song remember, all tl 

wheeling world forget" ; and their thoughts alike wander back for 

moment, 

"Through the meadows of the sunset 
To the land where the dead dreams go." 

In his poetry Noyes has pictured three kinds of outdoor scene 
which, though sometimes separate, are more often blended. They a: 
the light cherry-blossom scenes of Japan, the deep woodland scen( 
of Old England, and the magic enchanted scenes of Fairyland, 
all his poetry is that touch of nature which adds life and beauty to 

In Japan, "The cherry trees are seas of bloom, and soft perfunn 
and sweet perfume." Lightly and lovely he paints those picture; 
Over the purple cherry tops you see the blue pagoda tops, and abo^ 1 
these rises the outline of the snow-peak against the silvery sky. H 
more constant use of the Japanese beauty, however, is to put th 
purple glow, the cherry-blossom touch, into the other out-of-doo 
scenes. 

Being a true Englishman, he loves to go back into the deep wooc 
land dells of old England. Into the stately Sherwood forest he place 



The St. Mary's Muse. 157 

gain Robin Hood, with his merry men. The bugle notes sound 

irough the leaves, and through the shady glens ; across the glades of 

3rn the robber band meets again at the old trysting tree. Other 

limpses of this forest appear many times in other poems. 

Best of all, however, he loves his wonderful fairyland. Come into 

The Forest of Wild Thyme" and join the children in their search 

:>r Peterkin, and you will find fairyland in all its charm. It is 

vilight, a purple haze hangs softly over the woods, and the bluebells 

ing sweetly through the enchanted glades, as with the tiny fairies 

ou go on the journey. What a dreamer ISToyes is, that he can see 

lings again as a little child, and go with them into that wonderful 

airyland : 

"Oh, grownups cannot understand, 
And grownups never will, 
How short's the way to fairyland 

i Across the purple hill; 

And yet at just a child's command 
The world's an Eden still." 

But he understood ; and, as you go through the violet glades and 
limb the purple perfumed hill, you understand in part. In those 
r oods lives Little Boy Blue, and you almost hear his golden horn, 
'here the Spider invites you into his queer cobwebby parlor, and you 
?e the Sparrow who killed Cock Robin. Among all these wonderful 
lings his Fairy is the most beautiful: 

"Men upon earth 
Bring us to birth 

Gently at even and morn; 
When as brother and brother 
They greet one another 

And smile — then a fairy is born." 

How, but with such fairies, could you pass over a broad blue bridge 
P forget-me-nots into the realms of Noyes' wonderful Fairyland ? 
In all of his descriptions we find the same wonderful imagination : 

"And God sighed in the sunset, 
And the sea grew quieter than the hills." 

He finds the place where the rich light mellows away in the west, 
ad he hears the laugh of morn. 



158 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Is it a wonder, then, that with such a store of charm he can dr 
all men unto him ? It is for this reason that they say he plays uj. 
a lyre, the lyre which charmed in olden days even the wild creatu 
of the ancient forest. So, again, we pause as Noyes, our out-of-do 
poet, plays lightly upon his lyre, and sends forth sweet music 
nature and human things. 



The Seasons 



Annie S. Cameron, '16. 

Wake, Field, and wake, Forest! 
For Spring is returning. 
Put on your green robes 
And appear at the dance; 
Our champion, the sun, 
The cold snow is burning; 
It melts from before him 
At each ardent glance. 

Wake, Field, and wake, Forest! 
For Summer is coming. 
Oh, darken your green leaves 
And put forth your shade. 
The wild bee has come — 
List his musical humming 
As he flits o'er the flowers 
Of meadow and glade. 

Rest, Field, and rest, Forest! 
For Autumn is calling. 
Oh, doff your gay robes 
And prepare for your sleep. 
Swift from your branches 
The bright leaves are falling; 
Soon they'll be wrapt 
In a white winding-sheet. 

Sleep, Field, and sleep, Forest! 
'Till Spring shall release you 
From Winter's cold bonds 
And his chill, icy chain, 
When, with gay flowers blooming 
And sweet song-birds singing, 
You in your beauty 
Shall dance once again. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 159 



An Old Valentine 



Aline Hughes. 

It was a rainy, dismal day, the thirteenth of February, and Ruth 
ras in despair as to her costume for the Valentine Masquerade. 
Anally she decided to appeal to her grandmother for an idea. 

Mrs. Peyton, seated by her window, had been gazing out on the 
tare February landscape, and had sent her thoughts far away into 
he bygone days, so that Ruth's knock had to be repeated several times 
►efore it was heard. However, when grandmother discovered the 
ause of Ruth's distress she was all attention. After thinking for 
everal minutes she said, "Run up into the attic, dear, and far back 
mder the eaves you will find an old wooden chest. Here is the key 
o it, and down in the very bottom you will find a square box with a 
ed heart on it. If you will bring this to me, Ruthie, I think I can 
telp you. Be sure to lock up the chest !" 

Ruth ran off quickly and presently came back into the room, care- 
ully holding a large, white cardboard box, on the top of which a red 
leart was painted. Mrs. Peyton opened the box and tenderly lifted 
everal layers of white tissue paper, which sent out a soft sweet per- 
ume into the room. As she lifted the last sheet she disclosed a large 
>ld-fashioned valentine, on which were fat doves, forget-me-nots, 
lansies and Cupids in profusion. 

After Ruth had exclaimed enthusiastically over this, her grand- 
nother drew from the box a little old-fashioned dress of purple and 
jold, made to represent a pansy. 

"My dear," she said, "this dress looks very queer to you now, but 
. must tell you its story and why I love it." She smoothed the dress 
of tly and smiled to herself, then began the story. 

"You see, my dear, your grandfather and I were sweethearts, even 
vhen we were merely children ; and as we grew up there was a tacit 
mderstanding between our families that some time in the future we 
vould marry. 

"When I was eighteen, and he only two years older, James was 
offered a splendid position in the west which required his immedi- 



160 The St. Mary's Muse. 



' 



ately leaving home. He wanted me to marry him then, and when 
refused he left me in a temper, and caught the night coach th 
started him on his western journey. Child, I discovered very soc 
that my heart had gone with him, and I grew more and more wretch* 
as the months passed and I received no word from him. I was t( 
proud to give in first and write to him. 

"And then, dear child, came that great calamity, the war betwef 
the North and South. My father and brothers, as loyal North Car 
linians, soon left my mother and me at home, with a few old servant 
while they went to join the ranks, and the report was brought to n 
that James had come back to join General Lee's army, though li 
never wrote me a word. 

"It was on one thirteenth of February, while my father was 
home on a short visit, that several of my young friends and I planne; 
a small dance to cheer up our own spirits and those of the few so 
diers then at home on furlough. And it was while we were eating on' 
very meager dinner that a courier rode up to the house with a not 
for me — from James ! In this note he said that he had just reco^ 
ered from a severe wound and that during his sickness he had realize 
that he was in the wrong about our quarrel. He said that he woul 
try to be at our little valentine dance, and at the last he asked me t 
be heartsease to him by forgiving him everything. With the no1 
was this valentine, and, my dear, perhaps you can imagine how ver; 
happy they both made me, although I fully realized that I, not he 
had been in the wrong. 

"Out of my very scanty wardrobe my mother and I managed t 
make this dress into the likeness of a pansy, because of his referenc 
to one in his note. That night I saw him, dearest, and pledged mysel 
to be his wife, and never, through all our years together, did I eve 
regret that pledge." 

There was silence in the room for a while, and then Ruth, kissin 
Mrs. Peyton's cheek, softly whispered, "Thank you, grandmother 
for the story and for a lovely idea." She slipped away leaving he 
grandmother to thoughts of the strong but gentle partner who had no 
left her even now, but had "only passed on before." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 161 



The Coming of Spring 



Henrietta Morgan, '18. 

A radiant gleam upon the hills, 
A gleam that pierces through the mist, 

Which sorrowing Nature notes with thrills 
And stops to hold her breath and list. 

To hear the soft footsteps of Spring — 
The princess and the maiden fair 

That traces, with her light steps, rings 
Of magic 'mid the earth and air. 

The sheltering arms of flowers upspring, 
The tiny arms, both green and stout, 

That clasp the heads that wish to fling 
And dance and flitter round about. 

Those slender heads of white and gold 
Will grow and rise and strengthen fast 

To height and beauty yet untold, 
And seek the children's arms at last. 

So thus the princess works her charm, 
Forth wandering over hill and heath — 

The hills and plains and valleys warmed 
By fragrance of her smile and breath. 

The princess is a priestess, too, 
As shown by all her magic arts, 

And brings, as each day dawns anew, 
New living hope to human hearts. 



The Little Red House 



Edith Blodgett. 



I have a passion for red houses — not your great, ugly city houses, 
daubed with red, because, perhaps, it is a lasting color; nor yet neat, 
uninteresting edifices of red brick, lining an equally uninteresting 
concrete sidewalk, but for the little cuddly, aged red wooden houses, 



162 The St. Mary's Muse. 



neatly finished with white shutters and window .casements and pe 
mitting admittance by glistening brass knockers. 

I have one in mind now — just fitting my description: a little s> 
back from a white dusty country road, on a slope of dandelion-dotte 
grass. The little path leading up to the house is unbordered, seen 
ing to save all the radiance of flowers for the sides of the house an 
the garden itself. A lilac bush, profuse with its nodding fragrai' 
blossoms, guards the worn doorstep; and you must always stop \ 
pick a branch. It is none of your city bushes placed for ornamei' 
and display of a well-paid gardener's ability, but a genuine counti 
bush laden with fragrance and beauty and promise of more blossonl 
for every one you pick. 

Once inside the door of my little red house you are still more a 
sured of its country bounty. The long, low-ceiled dining-room, wit 
its ample cupboards gleaming with blue china, its strong yellov 
painted chairs and broad table, and last, but surely not least, its su 
prisingly enormous fireplace. Though its old brick bottom is no 
hollowed out with patient bearing of heavy burdens and its worj 
hearth a little uneven and shaky, the fireplace still bravely support 
huge logs, and roars with big, honest blazes on wintry eves. 

The rest of the house is unimportant in my eyes compared to thij 
room. One might describe the tiny room at the back, quaint witJ 
its old-fashioned spinnet and yellowed etchings, and with its Ion 
glass door leading to the sunny garden ; but my imagination leap] 
beyond the other rooms, perhaps to the view of the long shadow-lace 
hills from the tiny paned windows in front, or to the prim paths o 
the drowsy garden. 

This little house of my reveries is unchanged from the first day 
knew it, and waits, now, away back in the New England hills, fd 
my ever new enthusiasm. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 161 



Monday Morning at St. Mary's 



Emma Badham, '17. 

"Oh ! there is that old rising bell again ; really it must be ringing 
m hour too soon." These thoughts are in the sleepy mind of every 
St. Mary's girl when she wakes up on Monday morning, the best of 
ill mornings. Then there is a general scuffle to get dressed, and after- 
wards can be seen girls from all directions, some tying on their ties, 
)thers holding up hair which seems to be escaping from at least three 
lairpins. After the usual muffins and toast have held their attention 
for a very few minutes, the girls make one dart for the mail line, 
although some, having given up all hopes of getting near to the win- 
low, take one "unit" around the grove. Then to the mail box they 
£0, often coming away with a blank look upon their faces until they 
neet an everlasting treasurer and with a smiling face and willing 
nanner give up a dollar or two without a whimper. Those who have 
noney enough left— and in some way there are plenty who seem to 
?et it — come forth dressed in the height of fashion to go "shoppin'." 
But, alas ! there are others less lucky than these, who file into the 
English Room just as the little bell taps at ten o'clock a welcoming 
;o the disappointed. 

A lull in the noise and bustle now calms everything except an occa- 
sional ragtime piece on a Victrola or piano or some romping about by 
",he younger children. After about an hour of this halfway quiet- 
aess the exciting or, at least, noisy time comes. At twelve-thirty 
sharp there can be seen a long line of girls get off the street car and 
3ome up the front "walk, as if to say, "What a grand time we did 
have ! Saw lots of people we know, and are going to be so good next 
tveek that Miss Thomas will let us go again." 



164 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS 






February 17 — St. Cecelia Concert 

The St. Cecelia Club, composed of Raleigh women music-lovers, 
which Mr. R. Blinn Owen is director, gave its annual recital in t 
St. Mary's Auditorium on the night of Thursday, February I7t 
The audience was large and enthusiastic and the concert was ve 
much enjoyed. 

The program was made up entirely of American music, which mat 
it a particular pleasure to those who are interested in the promotion 
a national music. The opening number was delightful and the viol 
selections of Miss Abbott were thoroughly enjoyed. Mrs. Owen sai 
with her usual charm of manner. Of the last group the "Louisiai 
Lullaby" was particularly enjoyed by the audience, and the "Slave 
Dream," an adaptation of Longfellow's poem of that name, made 
very dramatic ending. 

The program was as follows : 

I've Been Roaming Marschal-Loepe 

Morning Victor Harris 

Incidental Solo — Mrs. Palmer Jerman 
A Milk Toast Reginald Spier 

Swing Song Ethel Barns 

Chant Negre A. Walter Kramer 

From a Wigwam Cecil Burleigh 

To the Warrior Cecil Burleigh 

Miss Muriel Abbott 

The Charm of Spring Robert Coningsby Clark 

Sweetheart, Sigh No More Charles Fonteyn Manney 

Mrs. R. Blinn Owen 
Violin Obligato — Miss Abbott 

The Bee Godard-Shelley 

Louisiana Lullaby Fay Foster 

Bouna Notte Ethelbert Nevin 

The Slave's Dream (Choral Ballad) Harry A. Matthews 

Incidental Solo — Mrs. B. Moore Parker 

Orchestral Accompaniment 
Miss Muriel Abbott, 1st Violin Dr. Geo. Summet, Jr., Cello 

Miss Jerger, 2d Violin Miss Phillips, Accompanist 



- 






- 



■:: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 165 



February 19— Mrs. Sutton's Talk 

The Good Shepherd Branch of the Girls' Friendly Society, under 
the leadership of Mrs. Louis V. Sutton, whom St. Mary's knew as 
("Canty Venable," is much interested in the establishment of a Girls' 
Lodge in Raleigh. It was a pleasure to have Mrs. Sutton at St. 
Mary's on Saturday evening, the 19th, and to hear her in the School 
Room. She made a short but very interesting talk, in which she 
spoke of the work that is being done by the Society, and especially 
emphasized the great need for the Lodge. The Chapel offering on the 
following Sunday was devoted to the cause. 

Mrs. Sutton, who is a daughter of former President Venable of the 
University of North Carolina, was recognized as having much talent 
in art in her St. Mary's days in 1902-'04, and a number of her draw- 
ings are preserved in early numbers of the Muse. 

February 19— The Colonial Ball 

It seemed as if the ladies and gentlemen of former days had 
stepped down from their picture-frames on the evening of Saturday, 
February 19th, when the procession of beautiful colonial dames and 
handsome young gallants, led by Jo Wilson and Alice Latham, 
marched proudly into the old parlor. 

After the grand march, in which the little flag favors were distrib- 
uted, the couples formed for many figures and dances. Among them 
the old-fashioned Virginia reel was danced with as much grace and 
gallantry as in the colonial days. When the bright intricacies of the 
figures had been traced out and the whirling of the reel was over, 
simple refreshments of orange ice and cake were served. 

All too soon the prosaic lights flashed and, like Cinderella at the 
tjtroke of twelve, the festivities of the evening came to an end. 

V. C. A. 'IT. 
February 22 — Father Harrison's Address 

The Rev. McVeigh Harrison, of the Order of the Holy Cross, con- 
ducted a two-weeks mission at Christ Church, from February 19th to 
March 6th, in connection with the nation-wide preaching mission. 
Many at St. Mary's were able to hear him at the services at Christ 
Church and were greatly helped by the mission. 



166 The St. Maky's Muse. 

We were fortunate at St. Mary's in having Father Harrison with 
us at the Chapel service on Tuesday, February 22d, when he made a 
brief talk on the Incarnation. His message of the life and immor- 
tality brought into the world by the birth of Christ was indeed beau- 
tiful. 

Father Harrison's special work is at St. Andrew's, at Sewanee, 
Tenn., where the Order of the Holy Cross conducts a school for moun- 
tain boys. 

February 22 — Washington's Birthday Celebration 

The annual joint meeting of the three Literary Societies in honor 
of Washington's Birthday was held in the parlor on the afternoon of 
February 2 2d, with Frances Geitner, President of Alpha Rho, pre- 
siding. 

The meeting opened with the singing of "Washington," after which 
Frances Waters read a short sketch of Washington's life, and Jose- 
phine Myers read his Speech on Being Made Commander-in-Chief. 
"Carolina" was heartily sung. Then Frances Hillman read "The 
Battle of Trenton," and Elmyra Jenkins gave an interesting account 
of "Why Washington Was Great." 

The program closed with the singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

The day was observed by a half holiday, which was introduced by 
the meeting. R. H. H. '16. 

February 26 — Parlor Entertainment 

On Saturday evening, February 26, in the Parlor, a very ingenious 
entertainment for the benefit of the Muse was given under the active 
management of Josephine Wilson, who had previously "won fame" 
through her "Ragtime Band." The girls and the Faculty greatly 
enjoyed the Gipsy Chorus, in which Lois Pugh, Frances Geitner, 
Violet Bray, Frances Hillman, and Ruby Bartholomew were fea- 
tured, and "Miss Outasighta's" voice, sweet and strong, had a pleas- 
ant reminder of Frances Tillotson, while the master of ceremonies 
herself afforded a large part of the enjoyment of the program. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 167 

March 3— Miss Crandall's Talk 

During the first week of March, Miss JNT. A. Crandall, R.JNT., of the 
Nursing and Health Department of Columbia University, was in 
Raleigh, under the auspices of some of the city civic organizations, 
giving practical lectures along her special line. It was our pleasure to 
have her at St. Mary's on the morning of Friday, March 3d, when 
she spoke briefly of the origin of nursing, its development, the work 
in hospitals and social work, and emphasized the opportunity for 
service which the profession affords young women. It was a pleasure 
and a stimulus to hear her. 

March 4 — University Glee Club 

On Saturday evening, March 4th, the Carolina Glee Club gave a 
delightful concert in the St. Mary's Auditorium. The concert was 
very enjoyable from beginning to end, and the Glee Club, the 
Orchestra, the Mandolin Club, and the soloists each gave much 
pleasure, and did the University credit. 

Particularly enjoyed by the audience were the novelties of the pro- 
gram: Mr. Simmons' yodeling, Mr. Long's accordion playing, and 
Mr. Wimberley's juggling. 

The visits of the Chapel Hill organizations are always bright spots 
in the St. Mary's year, and this was no exception. 

March 6 — Miss Abbott's Faculty Kecital 

It is the general opinion of those who know that St. Mary's has had 
no greater artist on her Faculty than Miss Muriel Abbott has shown 
herself to be the past three years here. She is a master of the violin 
and her audiences are always enthusiastic. 

Miss Abbott's recital on Monday evening, March 6th, was up to 
her usual standard and was thoroughly enjoyed. Mr. James Bonner 
sang his songs well and Mr. Owen was the usual satisfactory accom- 
panist. 

The following was the program : 

I 

Symphonie Espagnole Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante 

Rondo 



168 The St. Mary's Muse. 

II 

(a) Sing Me a Song of a Land That is Gone Homer 

(&) June Quilter 

Mr. James Bonner 

III 
Caprice XXIV Paganini-Kreisler 

IV 

Slavonic Dance No. 1, G Minor Dvorak-Kreisler 

Viennese Popular Song Kreisler 



Miss Muriel Abbott, Violinist 

Mr. James Bonner, Baritone 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen, Accompanist 

March 16 — Music Pupils' Recital 

Music pupils' recitals are held regularly in the Auditorium on 
every other Thursday afternoon during the session, and that of March 
16th was unusually entertaining. The program consisted of violin, 
piano, and vocal selections, and each of those who took part did her 
part well. 

Frances Tillotson excelled in her two vocal selections — Salter's 
"Her Love Song" and Foster's "The King." Martha Wright's ren- 
dition of d' Albert's "Allemand Gavotte and Musette" was very much 
enjoyed; and Mildred Jerger, Frances Sears, and Helen Snyder 
played very effectively Papini's "Ballata," a very pretty violin trio, 
in which they were accompanied by Helen Wright. 

March 17 — Physical Training Exhibition 

On Friday afternoon, March 17th, the Annual Exhibition of the 
Physical Training Department was held in the gymnasium. It was 
decidedly the best that has been held and reflected great credit on the 
excellence of Miss Barton's work and on the work of each participant. 

The program opened with the Plighland Fling, danced by girls 
dressed in tarn o' shanters and Scotch plaids. All of the dancers were 
graceful, but Lilias Shepherd deserves special mention. Next fol- 
lowed the Primary children in a Singing Game and Flower Race, 
both interesting and well done, and then came the dumb-bell drill 
excellently done by a large company. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 169 

The Couple Race of the Sub-Preparatory Department was excit- 
ing, and the Dutch Dance was so popular that it was encored. March- 
ing tactics showed the result of the good training and the Pyramids 
were a unique feature of the program. The ease with which the acro- 
bats placed themselves in all sorts of unheard-of positions called 
forth the heartiest applause. The apparatus exercises were well done 
and were watched with much interest and excitement. 

One of the most effective numbers was the dancing of the ^Esthetic 
Dancing Class. The dances were very pretty and graceful and the 
dancers very attractive. The program closed with an Indian Club 
Drill, well done. 

It was an In-the-School function, and practically all of the 
School were present and fully enjoyed the occasion. 



School Notes 

Many of the girls have been taking advantage of the spring priv- 
ilege of a week-end at home ; a number of others are looking forward 
to similar pleasure in the next few weeks. With a late Easter the 
post-Easter season will be too crowded with good things for any to 
wish to be away during that brief month, and so all that are to go 
feel that they must get off at once, and as only a few can go each week 
it is not as easy as it seems. 

Lucile Anderson, Jaque Smith, and Virginia Williams were at 
home in Wilson on Sunday, the 5th, and Nellie Rose, Frances Cheat- 
ham, and Elizabeth Dorsey went to their homes in Henderson over 
Sunday, the 19th. May Tredwell, who had spent several weeks at 
home in Norfolk on account of sickness, returned on the 21st and 
Frances Geitner got back from Hickory on the 20th. 

On Monday, March 13th, Clara Urie Mardre entertained a party 
of her friends at the Yarborough, where her father and mother, Mr. 
and Mrs. George L. Mardre, of Windsor, were staying a few days 
en route from Florida. Their guests were Misses Emma Badham, 
Frances Cheatham, Elizabeth Corbitt, Katherine Drane, Nellie Rose, 
and Sarah Wood of St. Mary's, and Fannie Gatling and Janie Lyon 
of Meredith College. 



170 The St. Maby's Muse. 



It is always a pleasure to welcome back the old St. Mary's girls, 
and those of us who did not have the pleasure of knowing them in 
their school days are still greatly pleased to make their acquaintance 
and to make them feel at home. Lanie Hales, Elizabeth Gold, and 
Arabelle Thomas have not been away from St. Mary's long enough to 
be embarrassed by being "old girls," and their several visits to the 
School this year have given us much pleasure. 

Mr. Owen, Miss Abbott, and Miss Shull have given several out-of- 
town recitals the past month, with much credit to themselves and to 
St. Mary's. On March 7th Miss Abbott appeared in Henderson under 
the auspices of the Women's Club, assisted by Miss Shull and accom- 
panied by Mr. Owen, and on March 14th they gave a recital in Cary 
for the Cary High School. 

On February 16th the Thursday Talk was given by Dr. D. H. Hill, 
the President of the North Carolina A. and M. College. Dr. Hill 
spoke very interestingly of the important place which the women of 
today are to fill, and his talk was much enjoyed. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, head of the Music Department, and Presi- 
dent of the ISTorth Carolina Music Teachers' Association, attended the 
Annual Convention of the Presidents of the State Music Teachers' 
Associations in Chicago, February 16-21. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price ' One Dollar. 

Single Copies » Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. G. 
in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hott Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

¥?ZTZ^7^TT ' ' 16 } Business Managers 



EDITORIAL 



An Endowment for St. Mary's 

No school for higher education is firmly established on a perma- 
nent foundation in these days until it has a proper endowment. Hence 
the endowment question, from the day that St. Mary's became the 
property of the Church and no longer a private institution, has been 
a question of the keenest and most living interest to all those inter- 
ested in St. Mary's and the work of the School. 

While no public announcement has yet been made, and the plans are 
not yet quite ready for a public announcement, it will be a matter of 
satisfaction to every friend of St. Mary's to know that, following pre- 
liminary meetings of the Executive Committee, the Board of Trus- 
tees in special session on March 17th authorized a campaign for the 
raising of a fund of $250,000— $50,000 for paying off the debt, etc. ; 
$100,000 for buildings and equipment, and $100,000 for an Endow- 
ment Fund. The plans are being worked out and a definite announce- 
ment may be expected at any time. 



172 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The ShaKesperian Celebration 

Perhaps nothing which has happened this year has caused as much 
excitement, interest and enthusiasm as the plan for the Shakespeare 
Tercentenary Celebration. The storm of applause which met the 
proposal spoke well for the success of the plan. The celebration is 
divided into three parts : first, a literary contest among the literary 
societies, then the pageant or festival proper, and, finally, the Shakes- 
pearian play at Commencement ; so that ample opportunity is afforded 
for every person in the school to join in and take an active part. And 
to make it the great success that we wish, every one must join in and 
bring with them all the interest and enthusiasm they possess. 

As the celebration this year is taking the place of the inter- 
society debates, in order not to lose the spirit of contest, the first part 
of the celebration is to be a literary contest among the three societies. 
Here, especially, is where every student should enter in. Heretofore 
the honor of each society rested in the hands of its four debaters, and 
the loyalty of the other members has consisted in wearing their colors 
and joining in applause on the night of the debate. The plan of this 
year's celebration offers every member the opportunity to take an 
active part. All can, and all should, enter individually into the pre- 
liminary contest, and in doing so feel that they are honoring their 
society, regardless of whether the offering is good enough to win out 
in the contest or whether it is even especially good in itself. The 
main thing is for every one to do her best, not merely as an individual 
but as a loyal member who wishes to do all she can for the best 
interest and honor of her society. This is the true test of loyalty, and 
we are looking for a hearty response from every member of each 
literary society. 

Many forces will combine to make the festival a success. Miss Bar- 
ton and her dancing classes, Miss Shull and other members of the 
Music Department, the Primary Department, which is to furnish the 
fairies, and all the others who are to make up the townspeople, digni- 
taries, and Shakespearian players, are all making their plans to join 
in a wonderful whole, and it is with the greatest interest and en- 
thusiasm that every one will be preparing for and awaiting the great 
night. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 173 

The series of celebrations will close with the performance of "As 
You Like It," as the Commencement play, which is the especial 
province of the Dramatic Club. 

We feel it to be a privilege as well as a pleasure to be able to join 
in and have our part in the great Shakespearian Celebration which 
is being observed this year throughout England and America. And 
we intend to join all forces with all the interest, enthusiasm and 
energy at our command to make it the greatest success not only of 
this year but of many years. 



An Apology 

In the February number of the Muse there was published a story 
entitled "The Successful Doctor." It has been brought to our atten- 
tion by the editors of the Winthrop Journal that this story is taken 
almost bodily from a story entitled "The Littlest Lady," by Miss 
Annie ISTorine West, published in the November, 1915, number of the 
Journal. 

It is hardly necessary to say that the editors of the Muse are much 
humiliated by this unfortunate occurrence, and in making proper 
amends wish to express their deepest regrets to the Journal, and to 
Miss West. 



Honor to "Nell Lewis" 

The present editors of the Muse and her old friends at St. Mary's 
join in congratulation to Miss Nell Battle Lewis, now a Junior at 
Smith College, on her election as editor-in-chief of the Smith College 
Monthly, the most prominent of the Smith publications. 

Miss Lewis, who is a daughter of Dr. R. H. Lewis of Raleigh, a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of 
St. Mary's from the time the control of the School passed to the 
Church, graduated from St. Mary's in 1911, and entered Smith in 
September, 1913. 

During her St. Mary's days she contributed to the Muse some of 
the best of the writings published in it, her pointed verse and her 



174 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Everyday Sketches attracting especial attention. She was editor-in- 
chief of the Muse and Chairman of the Muse Club in her graduating 
year, and it is very pleasant to see that her talent is recognized by her 
selection to similar positions in the larger field at Smith. 

It is an interesting coincidence that this honor should come to 
Miss Lewis in the same week in which was published the School Life 
number of the Muse, which is largely a reminder of her. 



The Lenten Services 

Lent is this year very much later than usual, and there is a scant 
month of the session left between Easter and Commencement. Dur- 
ing the Lenten Season, as usual, festivities will be suspended, and 
especial attention will be paid to the Lenten observance. 

The Chapel services will be as in past Lents. The special Lenten 
services will be voluntary and will be at six o'clock on Wednesdays 
and Fridays, consisting of shortened Evening Prayer and brief ad- 
dresses. The Rector will make the addresses, except in the third and 
fourth weeks, when the addresses on March 29th and 31st, April 5th 
and 7th, will be made by the Rev. A. B. Hunter, Principal of St. 
Augustine's School. In Holy AVeek there will be daily services at 
six o'clock, with addresses by the Rector on the events of Holy Week. 

The Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D., the Bishop of the 
Diocese, will make his annual official visit to the School on the fifth 
Sunday in Lent, April 9th, Passion Sunday. As his visitation has 
usually been on Palm Sunday, it will be this year a week earlier than 
usual. The Rite of Confirmation will be administered at the five 
o'clock service. 



Darst-Harden 

The Muse would extend its best wishes to Bishop Theodore C. 
Darst, of East Carolina, who is to be married on Wednesday, April 
26th, to Miss Lauriston Harden, of Wilmington. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 175 

TK|E SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL 

In this year of 1916, when English-speaking people are uniting to 
do honor to our greatest poet — Shakespeare — on the occasion of the 
tercentenary of his death, the literary societies of St. Mary's are 
planning to join in a festival to be our part of the world-wide celebra- 
tion. The festival, with the literary meeting which will precede it, 
will take the place of the annual inter-society debates, which will 
therefore be omitted. 

The literary meeting mentioned will occur on the evening of April 
10th. At that time will be read papers chosen by competition among 
the three societies. Members of the several societies will submit 
essays on subjects relating to Shakespeare and his time, stories with 
their background and setting that of the Elizabethan age, and poems 
on the theme of the Tercentenary. The best of these from each society 
will be submitted in competition, one composition of each kind from 
each society. The best one of each kind will then be chosen to be read 
at the April public meeting, the palm belonging to the successful 
society as well as to the individual winner. 

The festival proper will take place out of doors on the evening of 
May Day. The distinction between a festival and a pageant has been 
put as that between a good show and a good time; our aim, then, is 
that our festival in its intention to reproduce amusements of "the 
merrie reign of Good Queen Bess" will be a general good time for 
all. All in School — from Miss Katie through Susie May Robbing — 
are cooperating and will take part ; all in School are expected to aid 
in the illusion of the representation of a past time by wearing Eliza- 
bethan costumes — costumes which the ingenuity of St. Mary's girls 
can easily create out of such mere nothings as present-day smocks and 
gaily colored cheesecloth. 

The program will consist of the May-pole dance by the girls of the 
Lower Preparatory, a fairy dance by the primary children, songs, 
singing games, group dances, and solo dances of Tudor England ; the 
closing scene of "Midsummer Night's Dream" — that "silliest stuff 
that ever I saw" — performed by the class in Senior English — all 
given for the entertainment of the villagers and high dignitaries of a 



176 The St. Maky's Muse. 



town of the England of Elizabeth and of Shakespeare. The merry- 
making will be under the direction of a major domo or "Lord of 
Misrule/' whose instructions all must carefully heed, even the boy on 
the hobby-horse and the insubordinate jester with his jingling cap 
and bells. 

The grand climax, however, of our Shakespearian celebration will 
be the performance at Commencement under the direction of Miss 
Davis of "As You Like It." E. W. T. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs ' L McK - Ktthiger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The Mcrvimmon-lredell Fund Again 

The all-important decision of the Trustees to undertake at this time 
the raising of the endoiwment which has always been necessary to the 
permanent success of St. Mary's has a decided and special bearing on 
the Alumnae question of the McKimmon-Iredell Fund. It is obvious 
that during the progress of the campaign for the endowment the com- 
bined and undivided effort of each and every one interested in 
St. Mary's must be given to bringing the endowment into successful 
reality. The Alumnae one and all will wish to do their part. 

As a preliminary to the campaign for the endowment, which will 
hardly begin actively before the fall, it is therefore obvious that the 
present Alumnae object must be gotten out of the way. Even before 
the endowment question came up it had been repeatedly pointed out 
that it was high time that the fund should be completed. 

Some have held that it is of chief importance that the Alumnae 
Fund should be closed, and have therefore urged that it be closed this 
May, complete or incomplete. The majority have felt that the fund 
must be completed, even though more time is required ; that nothing 
less than completion is worthy of the Alumnae. The endowment ques- 
tion has at least cleared the situation. All will now see that what is 
to be done must be done now. It should be all, but if only a part, then 
we must be content with a part. The fund should be finally closed at 
this Commencement meeting of the Alumnae. 



178 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Last September the fund stood at $3,500 ; as a result of the partial 
campaign in October and November $750 more was contributed, so 
that the present amount in hand is $4,250. The purpose was to raise 
$6,000 ; a less sum than that is hardly adequate for the purpose in- 
tended. One thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars more is needed 
and should be contributed this spring. But to do it the united effort 
of every alumna is needed. No large gifts can be expected, but even 
the smallest gifts in sufficient numbers will accomplish the purpose. 

There have been many promises of help a little ahead. This is but 
another case of where the giving must be immediate, or the cause will 
fail. A final attempt will be made to reach each Chapter and each 
member of the Alumnae, and all should understand that it is the "last 
call." 

Every old St. Mary's girl approves of the purpose of this fund; 
every St. Mary's girl wishes to do her part to do honor to and show 
appreciation of Mrs. Iredell and Miss McKimmon. This is the time 
and the opportunity. 

The spirit of the old St. Mary's girls should be shown in the re- 
sponse to this final call. What will the response show ? 



Some St. Mary's Girls in their Chosen Fields 

It not only gives much pleasure to their friends to note the success 
of St. Mary's girls in their chosen fields, but that success is a distinct 
encouragement to their younger sisters, who are still in their St. 
Mary's days. 

St. Mary's girls are proverbially good homemakers and mothers ; 
successful teachers who are proud to look back to their St. Mary's 
days and training are many; and the devotion of her daughters to 
the work of the Church at home and in the foreign mission field has 
been widely recognized. We would here call attention to the progress 
of some of the younger alumnae along other lines, as suggested in 
some recent developments. 

In the past year Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain of West Raleigh, 
St. Mary's, '10, has won the highest scholastic honors which have 



The St. Mary's Muse. 179 



come to a St. Mary's girl in recent years. Graduating quite young 
I from St. Mary's, Miss Chamberlain remained out of school a year, 
and then entered Bryn Mawr, where her record from the first was an 
; excellent one, and where she graduated last June with high honors. 
'IHer special work was in physiological chemistry, and so highly was 
| she thought of that on her graduation she was offered a special grad- 
mate scholarship in the University of Pennsylvania, giving her the 
opportunity to pursue her research work and at the same time, in con- 
nection with it, win her Doctor's degree. She entered on this scholar- 
ship only last September, but her continued success is very clearly 
indicated by the publication in the November, 1915, number of The 
Journal of Experimental Zoology, one of the standard scientific mag- 
azines, of the result of some of her experiments in an article entitled 
"An Attempt at Physico-Chemical Explanation of Certain Groups of 
Fluctuating Variation," by Jacques Loeb and Mary Mitchell Cham- 
berlain. Though the subject may mean little to the layman beyond 
the indication that Miss Chamberlain is invading fields of knowledge 
beyond the layman's ken, the fact of the publication and of her col- 
laboration with such an eminent scientist as Professor Loeb, who is 
the head of the department of Biological Research of the Rockefeller 
Institute, are sure indications of the value of the work and of the 
confidence of the authorities in the worker. 

In a more modest field, the success of Miss Louise Evans, a grad- 
uate of the Business Department of St. Mary's in 1904, is attested in 
an article entitled "Little Stories About Interesting People," in the 
January number of the People's Popular Monthly of Des Moines, la. 
The writer says : 

"There are few girls without a profession or business who have earned 
eighteen hundred dollars a year in a small town of about fourteen hundred 
people. This is what Miss M. Louise Evans, of Warrenton, Va., did and can 
do any twelve months when she is physically able. 

"Miss Evans, who is a graduate of a business school, was fitted for a posi- 
tion of bookkeeper and stenographer. Finding no opening for work of this 
kind at home, Miss Evans fitted herself for any opening in any kind of clerical 
work, and this she made known. 

"Opening a clerical office, Miss Evans secured several sets of books to keep, 
went out by the hour or day or week for clerical work, was appointed a notary 
public, secured several kinds of insurance agencies, built up a trade in type- 



180 The St. Mary's Muse. 

writing work, and did no little writing for magazines and newspapers. By a 
strong personality and lots of energy, Miss Evans made good in everything 
she undertook. While none of the sources paid anything large in the way of 
revenue, 'the many irons in the fire' proved lucrative. Miss Evans made 
$1,800 in twelve months in a small town in Northern Virginia." 

One of Miss Evans' "irons" has been the business managership of 
the weekly Fauquier Democrat, which she has conducted quite suc- 
cessfully. 

Any mention of newspaper work must also bring to mind Miss 
Susan Iden, St. Mary's, 1904, who has been for some years social 
editor of the Raleigh Times, and whose social page is a daily feature 
of that paper. 

Attention is called elsewhere in this Muse to the college honors 
conferred on Miss Nell Lewis, '11, by her fellow-students at Smith; 
and in the November Muse, it will be remembered, Miss Glenn told 
of the experiences of Mrs. Madelon Battle Hancock as a Red, Cross 
nurse in Belgium. 



Births 

Goodson. — On Thursday, March 9th, at Lexington, Ky., Georgia Hales Goodson, 

daughter of W. A. and Georgia Hales Goodson. 
Avery. — On Saturday, March 11th, at Morganton, N. C, Isaac Thomas Avery, 

Jr., son of Isaac T. and Margaret DuBose Avery. 
Ceuikshank. — On Friday, March 17th, at Raleigh, N. C, Mary Pride CruiJc- 

shank, daughter of Ernest and Margaret Jones Cruikshank. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 181 



Trje 1917 Anniversaries 

i On May 12, 18^2, the Rev. Dr. Aldert Smedes opened St. Mary's to its first 

pupils. 
( On March 10, 1897, the "Trustees of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C," having 
received a charter from the State, the Board met, organized, and arranged 
to take over the School from Dr. Bennett Smedes. 
On September 1, 1907, the Rev. George W. Lay assumed the Rectorship of the 
School. 

* * * 

In 1917 will therefore occur: 

(1) The 75th Anniversary of the Opening of the School. 

(2) The 20th Anniversary of the Church Ownership of the School. 

(3) The 10th Anniversary of the present Rectorship. 



The Semi-Centennial of the School was celebrated very happily at the Com- 
mencement of 1902. 

The Hundredth Birthday of the Founder was celebrated appropriately on 
April 20, 1910. 

At the Diocesan Convention of 1897 the first report of the Trustees of St. 

Mary's School emphasized the need of a $100,000 Endowment Fund, as a 

prime need of the success of the School under Church management. 
At the annual meeting of the Trustees in 1908 the first report of the present 

Rector emphasized the need of proper endowment as a prime need for the 

permanent success of the School. 






How could the Anniversaries of 1917 be more fittingly celebrated than by 
making this endowment a reality? 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
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Information for this Register is solicited. 



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w ncy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
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Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

RALEIGH 

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Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
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Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBEK 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ g THE ART DEPARTMENT 

infection I k- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 
in these J 5. THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
1 6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 
7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 

Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 



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CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Shakespearian Celebration (Editorial) 3 

The Literary Contest 4 

The Winning Contributions in the Contest 6-24 

To William Shakespeare (Poem) 6 

Annie 8. Cameron, '16. 
The Lowered Mask ( Story ) 7 

Josephine S. Wilson, '16. 
The Tercentenary (Poem) 12 

Annie 8. Cameron, '16. 
Shakespeare in Arms (Essay) 13 

Rena H. Harding, '16. 
Shakespeare's Escape (Poem) 16 

Frances R. Geitner, '16. 
The Theatre in Shakespeare's Time (Essay) 17 

Annie H. Robinson, '11. 
A School Day as Spent by Master Peter Howard 20 

Katharine Drane, 'IS. 

Other Contributions 25-39 

Shakespeare in Arms (Essay) 25 

Edith K. Blodgett, '19. 
The Theatre (Essay) 29 

Eva Peel, '17. 
Excuse Me, Mr. Shakespeare (Poem) 34 

Susan E. Lamb, '16. 
The Rat Behind the Arras ( Story) 35 

Dolores Holt. 
Master Raleigh's School Day (Essay) 38 

Estelle Ravenel, '1.9. 

The Shakespeare Tercentenary Festival 40-44 

The Program 40 

An Account {E.W. T.) 42 

The Shakespearian Commencement Play (Program) 45 

The illustrations in this number of the Muse are from photographs taken at 
the Shakespeare Festival. 



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I The St. Mary's Muse 

SHAKESPEARIAN NUMBER 

Vol. XX. May, 1916. No. 8 

The Shakespearian Celebration 

The celebration of the Tercentenary of Shakespeare has been the 
most conspicuous feature of the spring at St. Mary's. Comprising 
three distinct parts, the first two — the Shakespearian Literary 
Contest and the Shakespearian Festival have been given with 
marked success; the third part — the presentation of "As You Like 

I It" will be a feature of the Commencement season. 

The Literary Contest and the Festival were held under the joint 
auspices of the English Department and the three literary societies', 
and as these three societies include in their membership 1 practically 
the entire student body, the celebration has been, as it was intended to 

I be, an affair of the whole School.' The Contest took the place of the 
annual Inter-society Debates, which have been for fifteen years' a fea- 

; ture of the School Year. The Commencement Play is this year, as 

I heretofore, given by the Elocution Department and the Dramatic 

i Club. 

The plans and preparations for the Contest and the Festival orig- 
inated with Miss Eleanor Thomas, Lady Principal and Head of the 
English Department, and they were carried out under her general 

i direction and management. She was ably assisted by Miss Mabel 
Barton, Director of Physical Training, who looked after the dances ; 
Mr. Owen and Miss Zona Shull of the Voice Department, who trained 
the choruses and singers ; and Miss Muriel Abbott, of the Violin De- 
partment, who prepared the orchestration and directed the string 
music. The Play is directed by Miss Florence Davis, Director of the 
Elocution Department. To all of these and to the other teachers and 
the School in general, for all cooperated with the greatest interest to 
make the occasion a success in every way, great and lasting credit is 
due. 

This Shakespearian number of the Muse is issued as a reminder of 



The St. Mary's Muse 



the celebration, as a further evidence of the interest that St. Mary's 
has taken in the Tercentenary, and to let the readers of the Muse 
and St. Mary's girls everywhere know more of the details of the occa- 
sion, at which we wish that they could all have been present and which 
we know they would have all enjoyed. E. C. 



THE SHAKESPEARIAN LITERARY CONTEST 

April 10, 1916 

(Given under the direction of Miss Thomas, and under the auspices of the 
three literary societies — Sigma Lambda, Epsilon Alpha Pi, and Alpha Rho — 
in place of the usual intersociety debates.) 

"It has been almost three hundred years since Shakespeare's great 
contemporary wrote: 

Soul of the age! 
The applause! the delight! the wonder of our stage — 
My Shakespeare — 

Thou are a monument without a tomb, 
And art alive still, while thy book doth live 
And we have wits to read and praise to give. 

"We are truly glad that we have wits to read and therefore are ready 
to give the praise to the Master who was mot for an age but for all 
time.' It is to give a small measure of that due praise that we, the 
three literary societies of St. Mary's, are met here this evening 
to hear read what we have written in an effort to bring to mind 
something of the life of Shakespeare's time and something of his 
work. The papers to be read have been chosen by competition among 
the members of the societies." 

With these words the Presiding officer, Miss Eleanor Relyea, Pres- 
ident of the Sigma Lambda Society, opened the program on the even- 
ing of Monday, April 10th, in the Eliza Battle Pittman Auditorium 
— the evening which was the culmination of the Shakespearian Con- 
test, on which the contestants had been busy for the preceding weeks, 
and at which the results of the contest were announced and the win- 
ning papers read. 

The contest was open to all members of the three societies, and in- 



The St. Maky's Muse 



eluded five parts. The final decision was to be based on the results 
of the first and second best papers submitted in each of the individual 
contests. These were : 

(1) The best poem on the fame of Shakespeare or on the Tercen- 
! tenary. 

(2) The best story with setting in Elizabethan England. 

(3) The best essay (open to all) on "Shakespeare in Arms." 

(4) The best essay (for students of Junior English or lower Eng- 
lish classes) on "The Theatre of Shakespeare's Time." 

(5) The best essay (for students of Sophomore English or lower 
English classes) giving an account of a school boy's school day and 
holiday in Elizabethan England. 

There were thirty papers submitted in the competition which were 
judged by Miss Thomas and outside judges and in their official report 
the judges said : "It must be understood in fairness to individual com- 
petitors and to the societies involved that the competition was very 
sharp and no victory was so great that it should be accompanied by 
any 'cr owing' over others." 

In summarizing the issue of the contest the judges said: 

( 1 ) Alpha Rho leads in poetry with the four best poems, and comes 
second in two essay contests. 

(2) Epsilon Alpha Pi is first in the story and one essay. 

(3) Sigma Lambda is first in two essay contests and second in the 
third essay contest and with the story, and is therefore pronounced the 
winner. 

The winners in the individual contests were as follows : 

(1) Best Poem — 

(1) Annie 8. Cameron, '16, Alpha Rho (best two). 

(2) Frances R. Geitner, '16, Alpha Rho. 

(2) Best Story — 

(1) Josephine 8. Wilson, '16, Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

(2) Dolores Holt, Sigma Lambda. 

(3) First Essay — 

(1) Rena H. Harding, '16, Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

(2) Edith E. Blodgett, Sigma Lambda. 

(4) Second Essay — 

(1) Annie H. RoMnson, '17, Sigma Lambda. 

(2) Eva Peel, '17, Alpha Rho. 

(5) Third Essay — 

(1) Katharine Drane, '18, Sigma Lambda. 

(2) Estelle Ravenel, '19, Alpha Rho. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The contestants who submitted papers were the following: 

Sigma Lambda. Stories: Rubie Thorn, '17, Deborah Hitchcock, '19, Julia 
Bryan, Dolores Holt. Essays: Katharine Drane, '18, Emma Badham, '17, Vir- 
ginia Allen, '17; Annie Robinson, '17, Eleanor Relyea, '17, and Edith Blod- 
gett, '18. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi. Stories: Georgie Poster, '18, Josephine Frohne, '18, Jose- 
phine Wilson, '16. Story and Poem: Henrietta Morgan, '18. Poems: Jane De- 
Loatch, Nettie Carol Daniels. Essays: Rena Harding, '16, Violet Bray, '18, 
Alice Latham, '17, and Elmyra Jenkins, '17. 

Alpha Rho. Story: Josephine Myers, '19. Story and Poem: Katharine 
Bourne, '16. Two Poems: Annie Cameron, '16. Poems: Allene Hughes, '18, 
Sue Lamb, '16, Frances Geitner, '16, Charlotte Howard, '19. Essays: Estelle 
Ravenel, '19, Eva Peele, '17, and Mildred Collins, '19. 

There were thus ten competitors from Sigma Lambda; ten from 
Epsilon Alpha Pi, and ten from Alpha Rho. Ten poems were sub- 
mitted, ten stories, and thirteen essays. 



THE WINNING PAPERS IN THE SHAKESPEARIAN 
LITERARY CONTEST 



To William Shakespeare 



Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, A P. 



Shakespeare, thou callest us down through the ages, 
Stirring our soul though the years may be long; 
We, in response to thy Music's sweet magic, 
Wake to the glory and splendor of song. 
What is it, what is it, down through the centuries 
Calling, compelling us, lies in thine art? 
What is it, deep in the soul of thy genius, 
That with a flame divine kindles our heart? 

Still thou art striking thy lyre of heart-strings, 

Poet, Musician, and Master of Time! 

In the depths of thy soul and the heights of thy passion 

Years cannot change thee, majestic sublime. 

Down through the centuries still thou art touching us, 

Laying thy hands on the hearts of us all, 

Stirring within us still passions and longings, 

Waking our souls in response to thy call. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



As in the past centuries, so in the future 

In the innermost depths of our hearts we enshrine 

The spirit of Poetry that rested upon thee, 

Mystical, wonderful, mighty, divine. 

And though the years may be long and be many, 

True to thy touch and the call we shall prove, 

For deep in our hearts burns a spark which, though smouldering, 

Flames into fire at the name that we love. 



The Lowered MasK 



Josephine S. Wilson, '16, E A P. 



"Sweetheart mine, I've tidings for thee, and that of lively interest." 

"How now, Hal ? Hast used thy cloak for the Queen's feet ? A 
cloak be cheap admittance to a life at the court." 

"Faith, the life at the court be not after my taste. AVhy would' st 
have thy lover leave thee to go serve at the court ?" 

The peacefulness of the still May evening and the beauty of the 
garden in its bright May dress, formed an effective background for the 
lovers' meeting. Harry Stirley and Margaret Davenant had pledged 
their troth only a fortnight or two before and the novelty of their love- 
gave no little zest to the young lovers' enjoyment of the bright May 
season. 

"But come, Hal, the news — art for starting on an exploration, and 
be I to go wi' thee?" 

"Thou spoke truly — an exploration, but of a strange life. What 
say est thou an' if I be for turning play actor ?" 

"I say thou art cozening me to e'en make mention on it." 

"And yet, 'tis true, Margaret; Will Shakespeare himself hath of- 
fered me no mean part, and 'tis not every player Will doth recom- 
mend." 

"Harry — hast thou, a gentleman's son, turned player ? Why lad ? 
thou'lt break thy very father's heart and — " 

"Nay, sweet ! Do not say thine — I could no bear that. Ah, Mar- 
garet, canst thou not see that 'tis my very life to move men's minds 
and hearts by noble words ! My very blood runs hot at thought on't." 

"Ay — I see well enough — thy mind and heart ha' been turned by a 



The St. Mary's Muse 



ne'er-do-well player ; they all be rogues and saucy fellows. Why boy, 
'tis mad-cap-folly! Come, say thou wert but speaking in jest." 

"JSTo jest Margaret, but honest truth. What's more, I will na hear 
thee rate Will Shakespeare so. What sayest thou, a ne'er-do-well ? 
Why he is the sweetest fellow i' London, and an honest fellow, and 
none there be may gainsay that." 

There was a note of bitterness in the boy's voice as he spoke. One 
of the circumstances which had forced him to seek a living for himself 
was the loss of the Stirley fortune by some roguery on the part of 
Margaret's uncle. But in mentioning this' fact he had struck the 
wrong key, for Margaret, stung by the realization that her lover was to 
become a worthless actor, and hurt by his indifference to her feelings 
in the matter, drew herself up with all the dignity her eighteen years 
could command. 

"Belike an' we do not please thee ; be off to thy honest play actor ; 
no doubt the company be more fitting." 
"Must this then be farewell ?" 
"E'en so," 

As she turned from the boy he started walking hurriedly down the 
path, but half-way he paused. 

"Margaret, if there come a time when thou canst forgive me, will 
let me know ?" 

She shook her head. "I ha' made up my mind — so that be all there 
is on it." 

And that was all ; there was no move on her part till long after the 
young figure in his scarlet doublet and bright silk hose had passed out 
the gate and down the dusty road, leaving in his wake a stillness 
broken only by the echo of his footsteps on the garden walk, and then 
the pitiful cry of : 

"Oh, Hal, — 'tis not thy father's heart, but mine that thou hast 
broken !" 

******* 

May day, three years later, found Harry Stirley, not Shakespeare's 
inexperienced protege, but one of the leading actors of the "Lord 
Chamberlain ; His Servants," or as they were coming to be known, 
the Queen's Players. His youth and manly bearing had stood him in 







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The St. Mary's Muse 



good need, so that this evening for the first time he was to assume the 
role of leading actor. The absence of the Lord Chamberlain's Com- 
pany from London during the three months previous gave the first 
performance of their return an added zest, and it was with no little 
impatience that the folk crowded into the pit of the Globe Theatre at 
two o'clock in the afternoon of a blazing May day. The brawling of 
the groundlings was only increased when the gentry began to arrive, 
by the small pages' cry of : "Place for my Lord ! Room there — room 
I say! Make way ye louts — 't is my lord comes thither," while now 
and then a clamor arose of, "Come, come the play ! ISTow for our 
penny's worth !" 

Back of the scenes matters would have been equally as bad had it 
not been for the presence of one, who, now an actor, now an attendant, 
seemed by his very presence to calm the situation and instill courage 
into the actors, some of whom were wildly trying to recall their lines, 
while others beat the air practising certain gesticulations. In fact, 
William Shakespeare's influence over the actors had no little effect on 
the success with which his plays were presented. 

Nervous as Harry Stirley was over his leading part, it was not this 
part of which he was thinking. Standing at the entrance of the 
actors' withdrawing room, his attention had been attracted by a 
cloaked figure just then entering the theatre gates. A few minutes 
later, from behind the curtain at the back of the stage, he had seen 
the same figure appear in one of the boixes at the rear of the lower 
gallery. Though she, for it was a woman, took a place in the shadow 
of the eaves, and though there was only a moment between the throw- 
ing back of the hood and the adjustment of a small black masque — 
Harry could recognize that face in half the time. 

"Margaret — by my troth — and here at the play !" 

As the young actor thought of their last encounter and the long 
separation, he yearned to be back in the old garden and be able to tell 
her that 'twas all a jest — how easy 'twould be to take up the old life. 
As he stood there musing a hand was laid on his shoulders and a quiet 
voice broke in : 

"How now, Harry ? What dreams are these ? Thou art to make 
me proud of thee today !" 



10 The St. Mart's Muse 

The boy blushed crimson as he realized how nearly like treason his 
thoughts had been. What ! Change his mind and go back on his old 
friend ! Never. But what if she had changed her mind ? Her ap- 
pearance there at the Globe when she knew he was to act, all seemed 
to indicate that something had changed. Turning to his friend he 
burst out: 

"Will, thou art the very man I seek. I've a message must be deliv- 
ered ere the actors go on. Come quick — a quill. Here! see'st the 
masqued lady in a cloak ?" 

"With her attendant ?" 

"Ay — the same. Take her this, I pray thee, and Will — " In his 
eagerness the boy's voice shook : "Note thou, Will, if during the play 
she lowereth her masque." 

******* 

As the clapping for the last scene ended and the audience swarmed 
out upon the banks of the Thames, Margaret Davenant drew back 
from the crowd, fearing recognition. Will Shakespeare had handed 
her Harry's note with the simple request : 

"An' thou hast changed thy mind, do but lower thy masque and 
I'll come to thee." For the moment it had stunned her, but further 
than this it had no effect. The play had ended without Margaret 
lowering her masque. Harry had chosen his course — she hers ; let 
them continue. Starting from her reverie and realizing that she had 
become separated from her attendant she pushed eagerly forward, but 
found after a few bewildering attempts that she had lost her way. To 
go from the Globe Theatre to London proper it was necessary to cross 
the Thames, and at this hour of the afternoon, when the many ferries 
plying across the stream and small boys punting up and down made 
crossing very complicated. Turning to ask her way she recognized 
the bearer of the note coming towards her. 

"Thou seemest at a loss. May I be aught of help to thee, my lady ?" 

There was something about the man's dignity and ease of manner 
that prevented the girl's rejecting his offer. 

"Why, Sir, I and my companion have here been parted, but couldst 
thou tell me where to take the ferry I should, no doubt, find him 
waiting on the other side." 



The St. Maky's Muse 11 

True enough she did find her servant man, but not until enough 
conversation had been exchanged with the stranger to convince the 
girl that her companion was a man of superior qualities. As she 
turned to thank him for his assistance, he said with a low bow : 

"May it be Will Shakespeare's good fortune to be of service to 
thee again." 

Hurrying along through the dingy London streets her ears rang 
with the words "Will Shakespeare." To think that she had not only 
seen the man, but had even received assistance from him — an actor 
whom she had so often denounced and for so long held in contempt. 

This man whom she had always been prejudiced against because 
of his influence over Harry ! Why it was Will Shakespeare that had 
been the very cause of their quarrel ; and now to find that this quiet, 
refined man was he ! To discover that this courteous gentleman was 
the actor, the stage manager, the playwright ! Could it be that a man 
of the contemned quality he professed was this dignified gentleman 
whose personality impressed her with strange force ? 

Up through her confused thoughts there surged all the events and 
rumors connected with the name. Foremost among them came the 
remembrance of Harry's praise of him. After all had she not been 
mistaken in her judgment ? Harry had won respect and praise, and 
no doubt, through the very influence of Will Shaskespeare. What 
three years' time had failed to do in altering her resolution, an en- 
counter with the personality of a strong man was now accomplishing. 

There was a strange hush over the garden that evening as Margaret 
Davenant turned to greet the young actor beside her. Three years 
had wrought a certain change in the two, apparent more particularly 
in an added dignity of carriage and earnestness of manner. 

"Thou see'st, Margaret, that thy request to come to thee is as a 
command." 

There was a quiver of suppressed emotion in the boy's quiet voice, 
which seemed to find no response in the girl's offhand remark : 

"Nay — my commands have long since ceased. But tell me, lad — 
art still resolved to follow a player's life ?" 

"Margaret, thou knowest all that was settled long ago." There was 
a note of disappointment as he spoke. "Hast thou then sent for me 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

only to go over the same dispute and wound afresh the old hurt? 
Is't for that thou hast called me ?" 

"Nay, Hal." There was a shy reluctance in her manner as she 
raised her eyes. "I sent for thee to tell thee I have lowered my 
masque." 



The Tercentenary 



Annie S. Camekon, '16, A P. 



What a hurrying and a scurrying 

And a running 'round is seen, 

What a scrambling into smocks and cloaks, 

What a donning Lincoln green; 

In all this wild confusion, if the people don't look out, 

"A Comedy of Errors" it will prove without a doubt. 

See the madcap throng approaches, 
At their head a motley fool 
With his parti-colored trappings, 
Bells and bauble all to rule. 
You may take it "As You Like It," 
But this frolic seems to be 
The very spirit of old England 
On a May Day holiday. 

Now the trumpets flare and flourish, 
And "The Tempest" of wild sound 
Shakes the crowd with merry laughter, 
And they reel in dances round, 
And the "Merry Wives" and yeomen, 
Country lad and lass, with glee, 
Join together in the dances, 
In the songs and minstrelsy. 

But a sudden hush has settled, 

The great dignitaries near 

Here approach "Two Noble Kinsmen," 

The most important, it is clear, 

For the people bow before them 

And the trumpets blare once more, 

And 'twould be "Love's Labor Lost" to try 

To speak above that roar. 



The St. Maky's Muse 13 

When the uproar has subsided 
And a slight hush come again, 
The players are presented — 
They are just hard-handed men — 
But in "Pyramus and Thisbe" 
They excel themselves, 'tis true 
Are applauded by the people and 
The dignitaries, too. 

Then "Measure for Measure" reels the dance, 

And the merry dancers seem 

Hardly real or existing, 

But a bright "Midsummer's Dream," 

Or, like an old tradition 

Which is heard throughout the land, 

Like a "Winter's Tale" of May Day 

As it's kept in Fairyland. 

Now, no doubt you really wonder 
At the cause of all these dreams. 
"Much Ado About Nothing" 
Perhaps to you it seems. 
But we're gathered here to honor 
Great Will Shakespeare; for the rest 
If "All's Well That Ends Well" 
It has been a great success. 



Shakespeare in Arms 



Rena Harding, '16. E A II. 
(First in contest.) 



At the present day the greater part of Europe is submerged in a 
dark and bloody struggle which brings back to our memory the many 
accounts of former battles of the long ago. We have for so many years 
been accustomed to peace and calm that we have thought little of what 
war really means to a nation. One lesson, though, has been shown us 
through the horrible struggles of this present war, one truth : that "war 
is the great sifter out of the souls of men, the infallible test of charac- 
ter." War has the redeeming feature of beating "the metal of human 
character into a stuff that endures." War builds up the character of 
a nation. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 

Shakespeare lived in an age of warfare and his plays dealing with 
war are alive with character, born of the struggle of the time. In his 
historical plays he built up, stage by stage, his ideal of the warrior 
character, his hero in arms, and we find the man whom Shakespeare 
admires most in English History, his ideal, in Henry V. When as a 
youth he is presented to us we do not look up to him as a great leader, 
but it is Harry Hotspur who seems to us as a king's son, so much so 
that the king would exchange sons, for Hotspur is a soldier and to him 
the call of honox is so imperative that he forgets all else, and confi- 
dent goes forth to war. 

To draw a true leader and to form his ideal man in arms, however, 
Shakespeare needed better and higher qualities, and so the man whom 
Hotspur meets at the battle of Shrewsbury is not only a better soldier 
but possesses the higher qualities of manhood for, joined with the sense 
of honor of Hotspur he has a feeling of great humility. Warfare has 
now had its effect upon Prince Hal and he is no longer the frivolous, 
irresponsible lad of the Boar's-Head Tavern. 

"Now being waked, he doth despise his dream; 
Presume not that he is the thing he was." 

The story of the change in the life of the Madcap Prince of Wales 
is Shakespeare's shining tribute "to the purging, purifying effect of 
war upon the character." And clearly we see the need of reformation 
for Prince Hal. His father on hearing of the rebellion which threat- 
ens his throne, naturally sends for his son to consult, and let us see 
where he finds his heir, the Prince of Wales, not in the palace, but 
at "The Boar's Head," a low tavern where he was frolicking among 
his coarse companions. But when he is brought face to face with his 
father, is told of the troubles confronting him and realizes the disap- 
pointment that he is to the king, then he awakens, becomes alive to 
responsibility and honor, crying out: 
"You shall not find it so, 

And God forgive them that so much have swayed 

Your majesty's good thoughts away from me! 

I will redeem all this on Percy's head, 

And in the closing of some glorious day 

Be bold to tell you that I am your son." 

All that was needed- to bring out these true qualities of leadership 
was experience and responsibility. Hal the madcap, when he became 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

King of England, added to the courage and idealism of Hotspur, the 
saving grace of "self -reverence, self-knowledge, self-control." As 
Prince of Wales, Henry had no responsibility, and with his healthy, 
genial nature and honest love of truth, he found the atmosphere of 
the court stifling, so must go out and mix with youth. And these "tap 
room indulgences" were to be of great value later on, for when he 
became king he knew how to associate with the humblest of his 
soldiers, how to appreciate their manner of life and to win their 
sympathy and confidence. 

And now what a noble leader and warrior is brought before us as 
we see Henry advancing at the head of his men into France, where he 
goes to recover lands, even to claim the throne. With intense interest 
we follow the fortunes of this heroic, patriotic, English King, leading 
his small and weak army against the French forces, strongly armed 
and many times' its size, to an overwhelming victory. The king, feel- 
ing the great responsibility of his position, gathers his men around 
him and in the vivid picture given us of the time just before the battle 
of Agincourt, we find him praying for his men, they confessing to 
God, and then bravely going forward to meet their death. An ideal of 
strength, we hear him saying to his men, ever spurring them on : 

"We are in great danger; 
The greater therefore should our courage be." 

And although the English are cold, fatigued and hungry, patriotic 
and every loyal to their noble king, they become infused with his 
courage, rally to his cry and press onward with great strength and de- 
termination. 

Shakespeare presents a great contrast to us when on the day of the 
battle of Agincourt there occurs the meeting of the Dauphin and 
Henry bringing together the "solid qualities of a true king and the 
mere show and glitter of royalty without the substance." Even as the 
poet is able to picture his ideal as spirited in prosperous times so he 
shows him patient and modest in the most difficult and trying situa- 
tions. Henry represents the ideal man of action, ever fearless, perse- 
vering, determined, and at all times pious. 

When at the close of the glorious battle Henry receives the list of 
the slain, on finding how small the English loss has been as compared 



16 The St. Mart's Muse 

with that of the French, he ascribes the victory to God and then 
with his victorious army he enters London amidst great pageantry. 

In dramatizing this war between England and France the English 
spirit of loyalty and patriotism is quite evident. The whole drama is 
a national song of triumph. The individuals and the nation seem to 
possess such an unconquerable spirit of heroism that we feel that they 
can do nothing but conquer. We are given knowledge of the many of 
which a camp is composed : lords and knights both, also the homely, 
blunt soldiers, who, although at times rough and quarrelsome, are not 
low and are always brave. 

Throughout the entire play Shakespeare is thinking of his audi- 
ence and presents the drama in such a way as to quicken their patriotic 
pride, for he gives an admirable picture of the spirit of the good old 
times. And just here we realize the great poet's breadth and depth, 
for we have learned that he is not only the poet of youthful love and 
fairy fancies, of comic creations and of deep tragedies, but at heart he 
is intensely patriotic and in no sphere is he greater than as Shake- 
speare in Arms." 



Shakespeare's Escape 



Frances Geitner, '16, A P. 



Here, my harties. what's the row, 
Why this queer old dancing now, 
And such costumes? "Well, I'll vow 

This is strange! 

What! You say it's all for me — 
All this dancing, all this glee, 
I who've been for centuries three 

In my grave? 

That they're here to celebrate, 

My old plays commemorate, 

And my poor writ verse to state — 

You can't mean! 

Yet on this side 'tis "So Great," 
And on that — just hear them prate 
How I worked both long and late — 
All for fame! 



The St. Maey's Muse 17 

Why, I never tried to be 

More than rich Town Dignit'ry; 

Oh, that I should come to see 

Such mistake! 

Haste, I fain would leave this place, 
Or alack — within an ace 
I'll forget my very face 

'Mong such folk. 

One sees statutes far and near, 
Some are good and some are queer, 
Yet each one is marked "Shakespeare" 
Without fail! 

So I take my last farewell, 
And to him who asks, just tell 
That my bones rest in the cell 

Of my tomb! 



The Theatre in ShaKespeare's Time 



Annie Robinson, '17, 2 A. 



The stage is a mirror, reflecting the hopes, aims, aspirations, and 
passions of the people of a certain age, but the reflection is not only 
national but also universal. Artistic geniuses interpret human nature 
to itself and leave a record of past ages to posterity, but this is espe- 
cially true of the dramatic genius who holds a glass up to nature, 
revealing not only "the customs and costumes, the creeds and polities" 
of one age, but also "the inward springs and relations" of human 
nature, the same in all ages. It was the drama in which the English 
found outlet for their pent-up forces. They had hitherto taken but 
little part in art, literature, science, and discovery, but the Rennais- 
sance, the great intellectual movement which stirred all of Europe to 
activity of some kind, was to express itself in England mainly through 
the drama. 

In Shakespeare's time, when the drama came to perfection, England 

was in a state of transition from the medieval order to the modern. 

She was in an intermediate period when the old order of things had 

been softened, and the new order had not yet felt the effects of the 

2 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 

battle for existence. The nation had not jet become involved in its 
struggle for religious and political freedom, or in its career of coloni- 
zation and conquest, but was free to look about the world with an 
inquiring eye, to think of the future colored with dreams of the imagi- 
nation, and to devote its mental energy to self-expression in the field 
of literature. 

The Elizabethan Age was an age of romance, an age in which fear- 
less youthf ulness and vigor dominated. Thought and action were un- 
fettered. People were extremely alive and ruled by passion and in- 
stinct. Men hated, and they slew ; men loved, and if thwarted, they 
slew ; men aspired to conquer the earth, but failing, died with smiles 
upon their lips. Such was the turbulence of Elizabethan times, and 
our drama was necessarily to assume a Romantic type rather than a 
Classical one. Our dramatists were to write for a public which did 
not demand careful workmanship, but rather craved constant excite- 
ment for the eye and ear. Aspiring playwrights therefore lavished 
processions, coronations, combats, roll of drums, vibrations of thun- 
der, sheeted ghosts, and bloody spectres, until it is a wonder that any 
play contrived to delight the public, was ever logical and elevated, 
shapely and refined. And we marvel the more at the dramatic genius 
whose most careless work was masterly and who produced flawless 
specimens of the Romantic Drama works yet to be excelled. 

Indeed, when we of the twentieth century consider the actual cir- 
cumstances of the acting of plays in the Elizabethan Age, Shake- 
speare's genius seems more and more incomparable. Let us then go 
back three hundred years and attend a drama in order that we may 
appreciate the limitations and the advantages of a sixteenth century 
performance. Upon nearing the theatre we shall observe flags hoisted 
on high, and hear the first blasts of the trumpets proclaiming that 
the play is about to begin. A few minutes go by and a second time 
the trumpets sound. ISTow we pass through a great door, ascend some 
steps, take out our key, and let ourselves into our private room upon 
the lowest tier. Then looking about us, we find ourselves in a low, 
square building, open to the three o'clock sun, and built of shabby 
wood. Below us in the "yard," our attention is attracted to a noisy 
mob, the "groundlings" — mechanics, prentices, servants, boys, and 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



grooms' — who are pushing and jostling each other about, eating apples 
and cracking nuts. A similar crowd is in the two-penny room above 
us, with the addition of a few flaunting girls. We see very few re- 
spectable women, however, only one or two in side boxes, and they, 
carefully masked, are leaning forward talking with young gallants 
on the stage. Yes, five or six young men are seated on the stage itself, 
playing cards and smoking. A boy goes up and down among them, 
selling tobacco and furnishing lights. A tiled roof, supported by two 
wooden pillars, juts out over the stage and a curtain of tawny silk 
hangs near the back of it. Trumpets are sounding for the third time, 
and the curtain parts and out struts a player in a black mantle with 
a crown of bays upon a large wig. He is the Prologue, but he has 
scarcely begun before he is forced aside by the late arrival of a young 
gallant who must have a conspicuous place upon the stage. Now a 
'howl of protest arises from the groundlings', but our newcomer con- 
veniently settles himself and then allows the Prologue to proceed. 
Presently the first act begins and we look at a placard to find that the 
stage indicates a scene in Rome. There is little scenery and that of 
the crudest kind. For instance, a little later, a few wooden rocks and 
a couple of trees represent a forest in which a maiden, whose beard is 
not as closely shaven as it might be, takes alarm at a pasteboard bear. 
In the course of the play music is often made use of for our recrea- 
tion, and the interruption of the discovery of a cut-purse plying his 
trade is not thought out of place. Indeed, the groundlings delight 
especially in seeing him hoisted to the stage, and, amid cuffs and 
kicks, pilloried there. Now the play is finished and the actors on their 
knees are uttering a prayer for the Queen's Majesty, while we slowly 
make an exit. 

Such were the performances of plays in Shakespeare's time, and we 
are struck immediately with the thought of the difficulty of the play- 
wright's position, who must needs have depended upon the imagina- 
tion of his audience for his scenery, and upon youths whose voices 
were uncracked, for his most feminine characters. But, after all, the 
imagination can conjure up a picture far more vivid and real than 
man can fashion, and it is reasonably certain that acting reached a 
very high degree of excellence in those days, for Shakespeare could 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 

not have written for inferior players those parts which now tax the 
greatest actors to the limit. 

This same theatre was not only a theatre, but it formed also a 
school of popular instruction. It was' through the theatre that the 
praises of civil and religious liberty, and the celebration of national 
glories reached the ears of all. Here the people learned to love the 
Queen and to hate slavery ; here they saw deeds of patriots and of 
heroes' vividly enacted, here they grew familiar with the history of 
England ; and here the horrors of bad government and of civil strife, 
the harmful influence of court favorites, all were revealed. No 
national epic could have been so powerful in the formation of a public 
consciousness as certain dramatic scenes produced upon the stage. 
Finally, at best and at worst, the theatre of Elizabethan times was 
intensely alive, and it became not only the greatest expression of 
English genius, but the mirror of English spiritual and social life. 
"Rude as the theatre might be, all the world was there." 



A School Day and a Holiday as Spent by Master Peter 

Howard 



Katharine Drane, '18, 2 A. 



Master Peter Howard was a bright-faced English lad, fourteen 
years of age, the son of Sir William Howard, a wealthy noble of 
London. Sir William wished to give his son a good education, so he 
sent him to Westminster School, which had recently been reopened by 
Queen Elizabeth. The first glimpse we catch of this English lad is 
as a Westminster schoolboy. 

With a bound Master Peter sprang from bed ; it was about a 
quarter after five o'clock, and one of the monitors of the chamber had 
just called him up. Master Peter knew from personal experience 
that if he did not get up immediately it would be to his own discom- 
fort. He therefore jumped into his clothes — a sleeveless jerkin of 
dark blue serge, through which showed the white linen sleeves' of his 
shirt, with short trunks of the same material, long gray hose, and 
heelless shoes of russet leather — and hurried along with some of his 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

companions' to short Latin prayers. The boys then u went into the 
cloisters to wash," after which they scrambled to the refectory to 
snatch a hunk of bread and a mug of milk, which constituted the 
light morning repast of these schoolboys. These preliminaries con- 
sumed only three-quarters of an hour, and six o'clock found the boys 
marching two by two to the school, where the work of the day began. 

The room into which the boys marched was rather large, with the 
windows high up from the floor, and with long benches around three 
sides of it. There were four masters in the room, wearing long, loose 
black robes, each armed with a bundle of whips, for severe bodily 
punishment was inflicted for the slightest offense. These masters 
called their classes together, and then began the recitations. 

Master Peter's first class was in Latin grammar. He and his class- 
mates marched up to the master and stood before him in a semi-circle, 
with books open. The master called on one boy to begin the lesson 
and after he had repeated several rules the master had another boy to 
take up the recitation, and so on, until four or five pages had been 
recited. This class lasted for two hours, after which came exercises 
in Greek ; all the while there was a sing-song murmur in the room, a 
veritable babel of Greek, Latin, and English, for all of the classes 
went on at the same time. At nine o'clock Master Peter had a lesson 
in the translation of the catechism into Latin, which lasted for two 
hours. 

Eleven o'clock was the dinner hour of the school, and masters and 
students marched into the dining hall ; a long table stretched nearly 
the whole length of the room, and all took their places at this. At 
one end of the hall there was a raised platform, and on this was 
seated the head-master. First he read a portion of the Latin Bible, 
and then the dinner began. There was a dead silence in the room, 
except for the noise of the dishes, and even this was but dull, for 
pewter against pewter makes little noise. The boys were not allowed to 
speak during meals. It is quite probable that the dinner consisted 
of meat or fish, with vegetables, bread and butter, and perhaps some 
kind of pudding for dessert. After dinner there was a period of 
recreation, which lasted until one o'clock and which the boys were 
allowed to use as they wished — in playing games or in preparation for 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 

the next lesson. Between one and three Master Peter had a lesson 
from Cicero, with special attention to Rhetorical figures. First, the 
lesson was to be read in Latin, then to be committed to memory for 
the next day. Between three and five he repeated a page or two of 
some book of Rhetorical figures, or choice proverbs and sentences, 
collected by the master for that purpose. 

At five o'clock the students again marched to the dining hall for 
supper. We should think that after supper the classes would surely 
stop, but it was not so. Immediately after supper the boys filed into 
the chamber of one of the masters, where they were instructed from 
Hunter's Cosmographic, and were made to describe and find out 
cities and countries on the map. This was the last class of the stren- 
uous day, and Master Peter, tired and worn out, was glad to climb up 
to his room and to bed, where he soon fell asleep, dreaming of tomor- 
row's holiday. 

This was a typical school day as spent by a lad of the sixteenth 
century. As we have seen, there was a generous disregard for hours. 
The classes consisted mainly of Latin and Greek, with a great deal of 
attention to the religious instruction of the students. Let us now look 
at another phase of the life of these boys — holidays. 

Master Peter sprang eagerly from his bed this morning. It was 
at last Midsummer Day, the free day for which he had been longing 
for weeks. After dressing and breakfasting scantily he bounded out 
of doors. Nature had done her best to make this an ideal holiday. 
The sky was of the bluest blue, dotted here and there with fleecy white 
clouds ; the sun shone brightly, and the larks sang away above the 
branches of the tall elm trees. Many of the schoolboys were already 
out, enjoying themselves in different ways. Here was a crowd of 
younger boys, playing noisy games, there stretched on the grass was a 
group of older students, eagerly discussing their plans for the day. 
All, however, had the easy, carefree holiday manner. 

Master Peter struck off from the school and skipped gaily along 
the street. Even though it was still early the streets were thronged 
with a holiday crowd. Here and there were little knots of country- 
folk from neighboring villages, who had come into London Town to 
see the sights and the Triumph on the river, which was to be a fea- 



The St. Maky's Muse 23 

ture of the day. Here was a father and a mother, with their group of 
rosy children, while there walked a lad and his lass, spruced up in 
new finery and quite gay with bits of bright-colored ribbons. Bright 
children of his own age gazed wide-eyed and open-mouthed at the 
wondrous sights. There were dancing bears at every corner, with 
minstrels, jugglers, chapmen crying their wares in a sing-song man- 
ner, fierce wild men with rings through their noses, being led around 
by long chains, and red-capped baboons whirling about on long poles. 
Master Peter elbowed his way through this hurly-burly crowd and 
made for St. Paul's Cathedral, London's great meeting place. All 
around the outer square were shops with gilded fronts and most amaz- 
ing signs, golden angels with huge wings, bears, tiger-heads' and 
brazen serpents. This was always an interesting sight to a lad like 
Master Peter, but the holiday crowd gave it a more vivid appear- 
ance than ever. He walked into the cathedral and down an aisle, 
stopping before a pillar where a merchant tailor had his stand, and 
where, on all sides, he saw merchants, drapers, and goldsmiths. 

After leaving St. Paul's, Master Peter followed the great crowds 
toward the Thames, London's greatest thoroughfare. Here the people- 
thronged the wharves and banks', eagerly waiting for the great 
Triumph soon to take place. In the meantime, Master Peter was 
quite content to watch the stately swans, which were sweeping up and 
down the dusky river. Soon, however, cries arose from the crowds, 
and the people began craning their necks. Then suddenly there was a 
clash — boom — bang, and there the boats came pushing into sight en- 
gaged in a sham battle, accompanied with a great shooting of guns and 
flashing of fires. Then the grand state bark sped past, very imposing- 
with its high-carved stern, painted with England's golden lions and 
gayly-hung with brilliant silks and velvets. There in the midst of 
all this splendor sat the Queen, nodding and bowing to her eager sub- 
jects and followed by such a procession of boats that the Thames- 
water was fairly hidden from view. 

Immediately after this event a procession was seen coming at a 
lively rate. First rode four horsemen, mounted on gayly-caparisoned 
steeds, with huge silken banners flung to the breeze. The horsemen 
were richly clad in ruffles and bands, embroidered shirts, Italian doub- 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

lets slashed and laced, Venetian hose, and on their heads they wore 
gay velvet caps with jeweled bands. The horseman in front an- 
nounced that there would take place at three o'clock, in the Rose 
Playhouse, Master Thomas Heywood's new comedy, "The Three 
Gray Gowns." This announcement was met with shouts of applause, 
and the people thronged down Ludgate Hill to Black Friars Land- 
ing. Here Master Peter met with some of his schoolmates, and to- 
gether they jumped upon a wherry and were taken across the river to 
South wark Side. How different everythting was over here! They 
passed down a lane bordered on both sides with green fields, dotted 
with scarlet poppies. All along the lane were booths and tents and 
stalls, where were sold such enticing dainties as gilt ginger-nuts and 
caraway cakes with currants on top. Master Peter, in the excitement 
of the day had forgotten all about food, but the sight of these goodies 
recalled hit, hunger and he bought some of the caraway cakes, eating 
them as he strolled along. He and his companions soon reached the 
Rose Playhouse, an eight-sided, three-storied tower-like building of 
oak and plastered laths, upon a low foundation of yellow brick. The 
roof was of bright red English tiles with a blue lead gutter at the 
eaves. There was a little turret, from the top of which a tall ash 
stave went up and at the top of this stave a great white flag with a 
crimson rose on it was waving in the breeze. The boys entered and 
sat down in the pit with a crowd of common people. Master Peter 
saw that some of the gallants were sitting on the stage on three-legged 
stools. Soon the Prologue came out and announced what was to hap- 
pen: "The Three Gray Gowns, in which will be spoken many good 
things, old and new." There followed the play, with shouts of ap- 
plause given by the audience at certain remarks. Soon, however, it 
was over, and the boys hurried out of the playhouse, rushed by 
enticing entertainments such as bear-baiting and cock-fighting, and 
jumped on the wherry. As soon as they had landed at Blackfriars 
they hurried back to school. 

Our schoolboy fell asleep, worn out with so much excitement, but 
with the feeling that it was good to be alive in the spacious days of 
"Good Queen Bess." 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



Shakespeare in Arms 



Edith Blodgett, 2 A. 
(Second in contest.) 



Out of the Elizabetkean Period — that night sky-clouded with the 
mists of doubt and faintly-realized hopes, intensely luminant with 
noble strivings, lightning-flashed with patriotism, Shakespeare glows 
the one clear morning star. The keenness of his rays lightens every 
corner of life and leaves each radiant with added vitality. The bril- 
liance of the star illumines with gentle light the sorrows of an aged 
king and his two daughters, dances tantalizingly with midnight fairies 
in a fragrant forest, and brings to the light hideous crimes of jealousy 
and cruel ambition. That star pierces the veil of night that covers 
the glory of dead princes and bloody battlefields strewn with honor 
and courage. The star shines brighter and ever brighter here, filling 
brave, unheard-of battles with some of the warmth of the promised 
dawn it heralds, forsaking its usual silvery chill and glowing with 
intense light — dispelling the night clouds, making the lightning 
flashes of patriotism ever sear the sky, calling the thunder and winds 
to action, stirring all the great forces of nature and man to life and 
achievement. 

Let us, like the wise men of old, follow the star-lit path down the 
centuries and gaze at the warrior-king whom Shakespeare sets before 
us and at that mighty battle of Agincourt. The glory of that battle 
should ever ring clear — the glory which tells of a corps of valiant 
men fighting a winning combat against a host three times its size ; of 
the brave king who inspired his followers to almost unbelievable 
achievements and always turned to the Divine Power for aid ; and of 
the fiery patriotism which ever burns within the breasts of loyal 
Englishmen. Perhaps the description of that battle given in the play 
is a "mockery," as Shakespeare tells us it is, but the flashing descrip- 
tions of the battleground must be far beyond mockery for us. That 
we might truly admire the perfect warrior that Shakespeare makes 
live, let us peer through the night gloom at the battle scene itself — at 
the "creeping murmurs and the poring dark" ; let us hear with the 
waiting soldiers the hum of the armies, the neighs of impatient horses, 



26 The St. Maky's Muse 

the clang of the armorers' hammers, and all the various sounds that 
whisper of the coming onslaught. We all feel the dread of the mor- 
row, the horrible suspense, the tingling excitement. Then, with the 
morn, let the sun gild our armour, and mounting our steeds, let us 
be carried into the mighty fray ; and, worn though we are, sick and 
weary and half-naked, spent in body and mind, but burning with 
courage, we will be a part of that little band, and we, with them, will 
see the mighty host of French driven back over the mud and mire of 
the battlefield, over their wounded, dying comrades, back to defeat. 
We then can exult with our fellow-soldiers : our hearts can beat high 
with hard-won victory and merited patriotism : we with that brave 
company, can turn to our great king and leader — Henry the Fifth. 

Do we not see the ideal of Shakespeare ? Has not he shown to us 
a character worthy to hold the highest place as a warrior and king in 
the hearts of all ? 

The three characteristics that Shakespeare deems necessary for his 
ideal are bravery, sincere religion, and high patriotism. Of course 
bravery is an obvious requirement — but he paints bravery that can 
plunge into black, forbidding conflicts, bravery that can storm great 
walls of fear and doubt, bravery that can pierce heavy gloom with a 
flashing sword. Sincere religion is not so obvious a characteristic of 
a warrior and a king as we see him ; but Shakespeare makes it an 
essential part of the whole ideal. The man that sways an army and 
a nation must have undying faith in a Supreme Power to fulfill 
Shakespeare's standard. This devotion to God will always come first, 
and then, closely following, will be devotion to his country. "A high 
patriotism," we say. Does it always mean a patriotism that bleeds — 
a patriotism that makes us surrender love, glory, life itself for the 
fatherland ? This is the patriotism that Shakespeare means. That is 
the kind which his hero must possess. It is thus that we analyze the 
character of warrior king that is Shakespeare's choice. Let us follow 
his careful approach to the setting forth of his completed ideal. 

Under the splendor and glory of a great battle there lies all the 
horrors of bloodshed, cruelty, and crime ; so to let us see all sides of 
war and to more emphatically show the beauty of Henry the Fifth's 
character, such ridiculous, roguish men as Gower, Pistol, and Bar- 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 

dolph are introduced into the play. They are examples of men that 
fight for satisfaction of their own desires — to steal, pilfer, and op- 
press. Still, they have their own amusing side, and we all laugh at 
the mock-brave Pistol as he robs the ignorant, frightened French 
soldiers. These men, though, are but instruments for giving re- 
lief to us through humor, and we pass on gratefully to the amusing 
but really worthy Fluellan. Can we not see him there on the field % 
always arguing, expounding great theories, strutting about like a 
turkey-cock? Yet he is truly courageous, truly patriotic and level- 
headed under the amusing exterior. He is indeed a worthy warrior; 
but, as far as we know, he is nothing more. One other character 
plays a part in emphasizing the virtues of Henry the Fifth — and 
that is his father, Henry the Fourth. This king is all that can be 
desired in battle, but his calculating, cold nature makes him fall 
short of the true model of soldier and ruler. 

Shakespeare has taught us that an army is made up of various and 
diverse elements, and has indicated that each kind has an importance 
in making up a whole, but again he leads to his ideal — the exemplar 
of all the virtues of high military leadership ; the star has led us to 
the hero — Henry the Fifth, the ideal warrior and king. In the star- 
light he stands before us — commanding, inflexible in purpose, cour- 
ageous above all, bending always in prayer before the God he wor- 
shipped, hopeful, trusting, inspiring, loving the soldiers under his 
command, always loving his own country across the sea, fighting unto 
death if need be for the cause he upheld. 

As a statesman Henry the Fifth is marked by a severe conscience — 
one that refuses to let him enter upon a war that is unjust or a policy 
that is oppressive. He has clear foresight, making him assure him- 
self that while England is journeying across the seas to conflict with 
France, Scotland would not raid the country from the north. His 
foresight and strict conscience make his resolutions certain, and make 
him unswerving in decisions once they are reached. 

As a warrior Henry the Fifth commands respect and admiration. 
His steady, keen judgment makes defeat almost impossible. His 
ready tact and sympathetic "common touch" win the loyalty and 
faith of all his soldiers. Is he not an admirable figure — walking 



28 The St. Maky's Muse 

among his soldiers, stirring them on to great acts and high courage 
on the eve of that dread battle ? His own unspotted bravery makes 
him inspire like courage in others — for he believes and sees noble 
traits where, perhaps, only low impulses lie before the transforma- 
tion of his faith. 

As a king Henry is indeed a noble model. His dignity in office 
never leaves him, and he is always the unapproachable monarch that 
commands respect in men. He loves his people and devotes the few 
years of his reign to the best for them. He holds supreme power 
over his subjects — yet he ever turns to divine help in all his troubles. 
Who can doubt his sincerity in the devout prayer to the Almighty on 
the morn of the battle of Agincourt ? 

As a statesman, as a warrior, and as a king he governs our admi- 
ration and deep respect, but as a man he rules the hearts of all. In 
the first place, his great broadness of mind makes us, with him, 
despise the little shams and petty hypocrises of life. He is far 
above them — and remains noble and untouched by their spots. He 
is simple to the core, being off the throne a "man for a' that." Who 
could but laugh at his grotesque, human love — seen with Katherine ? 
There they are not king and queen, but plain man and woman, wrest- 
ling with unknown language and an embarrassing situation. 

The star has lit our path and illumined the far-off battle scene with 
its little company of players for our gaze. In turning back, let us 
carry away some of the star-scenes in our hearts, and let us be filled 
with the century-old wisdom that teaches us to be courageous, to hold 
always the native land high in our thoughts, and to possess undying 
faith in the power that rules all — God. 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



The Theatre of Shakespeare's Time 



Eva Peel, '17, A P. 
(Second in contest.) 



Toward the close of the sixteenth century England was beginning 
to throw aside her old ideas and customs, and imbued with the spirit 
of the Renaissance and the Reformation, she assumed an entirely 
different aspect. She underwent a revolutionary change in every 
department of her life — her explorers frequented the different lands, 
her farmers made the once-thought barren land bring forth a steady 
increase, her citizens grew in prosperity and social standing, and her 
nobility was created anew. As a result of this change she began to 
look upon the world not as a despicable place, as she once had, but as 
a great land of prized resources — the greatest of which was manhood 
with its "greatness and grotesqueness," its good and evil, and its joys 
and sorrows. Caring as they did for human life, their vivid imagina- 
tion longed for "living pictures and visions of it." Nor was it satis- 
fied with sculptured forms and lyric melodies. These could not strike 
the depths of human emotion so craved and coveted by them. The 
drama was destined to be the only channel through which their rising 
life could possibly find expression and through which that which was 
uppermost in the life of the age could find vent. It was saturated with 
the very spirit of the age, and was teeming with recklessness, passion, 
and audacity, and was fairly pulsating with vivacity. ISTo depth was 
there to which it did not descend ; no height was there to which it did 
not rise. It sounded the very depths of wickedness and vice, and 
climbed to the very heights of achievement. Because of its wide scope 
it became in time "the greatest expression of English genius, the 
mirror of England's spiritual and social life." 

Amid this enthusiastic desire for action the theatre grew up. It 
was not to leap full-grown into existence, but was, like other innova- 
tions, to have its serious drawbacks, and at first to lack the staunch 
and steadying force of public opinion. It was a plant of slow growth, 
and its development rightly divides itself into three characteristic 
and distinct stages. It had its origin in the desire of ministers to 
make practical and visible to their ignorant flocks the particularly 



30 The St. Mary's Muse 

outstanding episodes in the life of Christ — the connected story of his 
life from the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes to the divinely human 
martyr who gave his life as a ransom for many. When this had 
become too cumbersome for the church, the laymen took it up, and 
there was no change of method except that the action took place in the 
open street and in almost any place where large crowds were wont to 
gather. The Bible story soon gave a suggestion for the dramatization 
of saints' lives. In the early years of the Renaissance small com- 
panies applied the methods, which had been used in the dramatization 
of the Bible story, to historic narratives and popular fiction. The 
actors gave their performances in inn yards, where they set up very 
crude platforms. The stern, strict, Puritan element soon became 
opposed to this on the ground that it attracted the least desirable 
elements of the cities. So great was the objection that the actors had 
to leave London and give their plays without the city limits. 

This led to the building of playhouses, and before the sixteenth 
century had drawn to a close there was no less than half a dozen 
theatres' in and around London. There was acting everywhere. So 
imbued with the intoxicating spirit of action did the whole people 
become that soon every place was the stage of action. Professional 
actors gave plays in London, amateurs displayed their talent on the 
"village green," the gilds enlivened their festivals with plays, and 
gentlemen and ladies recited while in attendance on the queen. Eliza- 
beth was so fond of plays that the theatre had her steady support, and 
the drama grew considerably under her enthusiastic influence. 

The actors formed themselves into companies. In the large com- 
panies there were generally three groups of actors, namely: the 
sharers who, having gained wide reputation, were given shares to 
insure their loyalty to the company ; the regular salaried actors ; and 
the choir boys. At first these companies had some very close relation 
to the man whose title it bore, but finally this relation came to be a 
nominal one, and especially so unless the company desired to get 
favors from the Provincial executives — which favors they had to 
obtain through the intercession of their patron. In the case of the 
change of title or the death of its patron, the company assumed an- 
other name. Thus the company of Shakespeare was designated in 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



many ways, as "My Lord Strange's Men," "The King's Men," "My 
i Lord Derby's Men," and "Lord Chamberlin's Men." So very varied, 
Hong, and distinctively thorough was the training of the Elizabethan 
; actors that mere boys were fitted to take the parts of Shakespeare's 
! great heroines. The boys began by doing the very simplest parts, and 
< continued until they were sufficiently able to accomplish very difficult 
i roles. 

Having received some idea of the life of the Shakespearian actors, 
having been informed of their "financial backing," and having ascer- 
tained that they were in well organized companies with protection 
often of the highest rank, let us' try to acquaint ourselves with the 
theatre itself, and with the features which are most strikingly charac- 
teristic of the time. We can understand the theatre of Shakespeare's 
time best when we interpret it in terms of the fourteenth century 
theatre; for it was from the fourteenth century that the playwrights 
of the sixteenth century inherited their traditions. The theatres of 
the Elizabethan period bore evidence of the earlier existing con- 
ditions under which plays were presented. The London theatre was 
a modification of the courtyard of the old English Inn, and its "yard" 
— the space which we now call the orchestra — corresponding to the 
space of the old inn. 

Some of the theatres were hexagonal and circular, but the most 
typical and most famous of the time — the Globe — was octagonal. It 
is estimated that the theatres were of a capacity sufficient to accommo- 
date from three hundred to twelve hundred spectators, and, perhaps, 
infinitely more. The "yard" — the center of the enclosure — was, in 
the case of public theatres, open to the sky and during a rain those 
occupying the seats in its compass were drenched by the beating rain. 
In the case of private theatres, this center space was usually roofed. 
Rising directly from the center of the "yard," or pit as it is some- 
times called, was erected a long flag-pole. One portion of the en- 
closure was devoted to the stage. The stage supported by strong 
pillars, and roofed as a protection in inclement weather, was exceed- 
ingly narrow and projected far out into the audience. It was partly 
filled with spectators, and was open to view on all sides save at the 
back, where was hung a curtain. This curtain rent in the middle 



32 The St. Maky's Muse 

made three distinct entrances possible — one on either side and one 
through the opening. Behind the curtain were dressing rooms or 
"tiring" rooms', to which the actors withdrew during the intermissions 
between scenes to attire themselves for their next appearance. The 
upper stage was in the first gallery, and it is thought that sometimes 
the action was moved from the lower to the upper stage during the 
performance of certain serious plays. A kind of hood — known as 
the "Heavens"— projected from the wall in front of the "tiring" 
house, and extended over just about one-half of the depth of the stage. 
The space within the hood permitted the concealment of certain prop- 
erties and machinery which could be instantly let down upon the 
stage. Hanging suspended from the "Heavens" was a curtain, which, 
when drawn, gave ample provision for a change of scene, or for the 
placing of other properties on the stage. The music room was some- 
times on one side of the stage, and sometimes it was built behind the 
stage. 

The flying of a flag above the "Heavens" gave evidence that a per- 
formance was near at hand. The stage was strewn with rushes and 
at two or three o'clock a miscellaneous throng of spectators' filed in 
through the open doors. There hurried in gentlemen, masked ladies, 
grooms, boys, men of fashion, citizens, apprentices, and more boister- 
ous elements. The fashionable people, clad in their velvet cloaks and 
frills, having paid from six-pence to a shilling, were given seats in 
the boxes, or were allowed to sit on the stage on stools, which were 
furnished for the purpose. The men on the stage were a source of 
trouble. They were scornful to those who sat in the "yard," and 
hateful to those who were acting, and often prevented their entrances 
and exits'. The lower classes, those unable to pay, and whose purses 
could afford no more than two or three pennies, stood in the "yard," 
or sat on stools which were provided. As it happened the greater part 
of the crowd occupied these seats. While they were boisterous, drank, 
and oftentimes fought during the performance, they by no means hin- 
dered its progress as did the well-dressed gentlemen on the stage. 
Play bills were distributed ; they were very rude, and when a tragedy 
was to be enacted they were printed in red letters. When the trumpet 
had thrice sounded the curtain hanging from the "Heavens" was 




Prominent Figures in the Festival 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 

drawn aside and an actor came forward, clad in a black velvet mantle 
and wearing a crown which only partially covered his "capacious 
wig," and delivered the prologue. This was often interrupted by the 
"groundlings" or some late comer who came in making all the noise 
he could. After the prologue had ended the stage was ready for 
action — action which was almost in every case a real effort on the part 
of the actor, toward perfection. Though there was practically no 
scenery, we know of no stage which was ever so human, no poetic life 
ever so intense. They saw before their eyes the Horse of Troy in all 
his massiveness, and the sly Greeks stealing stealthily out from their 
secret hiding. Transformations of all kinds took place before their 
anxious eyes. Men were turned into huge trees, and trees were 
turned into men. Angelic spirits descended from their quiet in the 
"Heavens" to meet the hideous and raging demons, who issued forth 
from improvised caverns and wells. Frequently heads rose from the 
wells and gave answer to questions. Heroes rode across the stage on 
hobby-horses', and young ladies were frightened into feigned faints 
by pasteboard dragons, but yet no one was made ridiculous by it. A 
hint to the vivid imagination of the audience was enough, and as the 
stage projected far out into the pit the actors were able to gain 
ready response from their audience. 

For a theatre whose platform was filled along either side with arro- 
gant and obnoxious spectators, whose stage had no scenery except of 
the very crudest kind and no curtains except the one at the back of 
the stage and a small one in front hanging from the Heavens" ; for 
a people, whose alert minds kindled in them fit backgrounds and 
ample scenery for the accompaniment of action ; for these it was that 
Shakespeare wrote his numerous plays, and he lost no opportunity to 
praise England, "the precious stone set in the silver sea." 



34 The St. Mary's Muse 



Excuse Me, Mr. Shakespeare 



Susan E. Lamb, '16, A P. 



At first his brow was puzzled, 
He could not understand 
Why the plays he wrote so long ago 
Should be studied o'er the land. 

He was watching a modern English class 

As they busily "dug and boned," 

And a twinkle came into his eye 

As they worked and toiled and groaned. 

0, "what fools ye mortals be!" 
Laughing with mirth, he said, 
"I didn't write these plays, you know, 
To bother your nice young heads. 

"Wouldn't old Palstaff roar? 

E'en Juliet would smile, 

And Jacques leave off his melancholy 

Just for a little while — 

"If they could see you children 
Deep in these plays today. 
Hamlet would forget to be mad, 
And Thisbe to act in the play. 

"I'm in a holiday humour; 
I haven't had so much fun 
Since I tried to make old Falstaff 
Answer Prince Harry in puns. 

"It strikes me mighty funny 
That I should have such a 'rep'; 
And you who are earnestly working, 
I must say you've got 'pep.' 

"How I wish 'Old Ben' were here! 
No doubt he'd think this 'trie'; 
But in the words of St. Mary's, 
Will Shakespeare says 'redic' " 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 



The Rat Behind the Arras 



Dolores Holt, 2 A. 
(Second in contest for "best constructed story.") 



Just across the Scotch border line, for a quarter of a century the 
ancient English castle Wintolf had stood unoccupied, half forgotten, 
covered with vines, patiently awaiting the time when a banished 
prince or princess should again take refuge there. 

On a certain spring evening in the year 15 — the stately court of 
the castle was brilliantly illuminated by numberless candles in honor 
of Lady Mary of Essex. Lady Mary sat beside an open window and 
looked with unseeing eyes far out over the hills. She was pale and 
the dark circles under her beautiful eyes spoke of sleepless nights and 
deep sorrow. Presently she was aroused by rapid footsteps approach- 
ing the room ; she raised her sad eyes, then with a cry of joy sprang up. 

"My Lord," she cried. 

The man hesitated at the door, his handsome head held high, his 
arms stretched toward her. 

"Ah, my Lady ; truly it is thyself." 

"Mary !" a note of anxiety crept into his voice even while he sighed 
with relief and happiness as he held her in his arms. "Thou art pale ; 
is it true that thou hast suffered so much ?" 

"Ah, my Lord, they told me that thou wert dead." 

"And indeed I was to be killed, but my worthy Carin again saved 
my life, and I came tonight to stay with thee, my Lady." 

"Call me not Lady." 

"Nay," said the man, bitterly. "See what I have brought upon 
thee: the wrath of Elizabeth and banishment." 

"Do not speak so, my Lord ; have I not wished it ? Did I not, when 
the accusation of treason was brought against my Earl, declare before 
the Queen and her court that I had married thee secretly and was 
proud to be thy wife?" 

"And in that way hastening thine own downfall in her eyes who had 
signed my death warrant." 

"Let us not talk of that," she shuddered, "but rejoice that now may 



36 The S^d. Mary's Mtjse 

we live here, forgetting all else but each other." She looked up hap- 
pily into his face. 

At this minute they were interrupted by the sound of horses' hoofs 
on the pavement outside. 

Mary grew pale. "What can that be, my Lord ?" 

"My escape must have been discovered. Where canst thou hide me ? 
I was afraid of this. More danger for thee, whom I would gladly die 
to save from any danger — " 

Proudly she looked at him. "For the sake of love ; but come, there 
is no time to be lost." 

She pressed a spring and a panel in the wall slid silently aside, 
revealing a dark passageway. The Earl of Essex stepped inside and 
again the panel was in place. The heavy tapestry moved slightly. 
Eeeling that someone was in the room, Lady Mary turned quickly to 
find the insolent Duke of Norfolk watching her. 

"What have we here, your Highness ; a rat behind the arras ?" he 
sneered. 

"I think my Lord the Duke forgets himself," she said coldly, try- 
ing hard to hide her anxiety. 

"My Lord the Duke forgets nothing. Bring out the rat, my Lady, 
and let's away with him to his death. Out with him ! He cannot 
escape me. My men have surrounded the castle." 

She saw that he was under the influence of drink. 

"All this ado about a poor little rat." She assumed a lighter tone. 
"Methinks that my Lord has a very poor way of occupying his time." 

"Let us have done with this pretty figure. I know that Roger is 
hidden somewhere behind the tapestry." 

"Indeed I have no desire to speak with you at all, my Lord Inso- 
lence," she said, with an angry toss of her head. "When you speak of 
my husband you will call him the Earl of Essex, if you please." 

"Ah, ha !" he staggered toward her. "The Lady becometh angry. 
That will never do; no, no." 

"Stand back, my Lord, or by mine honor thou shalt die." 

"Ha, ha ! and who will kill me ? The rat has long since been caught 
in the trap." He sneered and tapped the wall with his sword hilt. The 
tapestry moved aside and another sword flashed out and struck the 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 

drunken, reeling man. With an oath he sank to the floor. The Earl 
withdrew once more behind the curtain. Several roughly-dressed 
soldiers rushed into the room with drawn swords, but stopped aghast 
before the tall, pale, beautiful woman. 

"It would be better for your master if you attempted to save his life, 
rather than stand there staring," she said, making a desperate effort to 
appear calm before her husband's enemies. 

They bent over the dying man to hear what he was muttering. 
"The rat — the- — catch the rat behind the — the — " he sank back 
slowly. The Duke of Norfolk was dead ! The men, now that their 
leader lay dead, stood aside awed by the mystery of the murder and 
the apparently calm, haughty woman. 

Immediately she grasped the situation, for she knew the Duke of 
Norfolk. He had hired and evidently equipped these peasants in 
order to capture the Earl (who had been suspected of heading a con- 
spiracy with Mary, Queen of Scots, against Elizabeth), to take him 
back to England, thereby gaining the courted favor of the great Queen. 

Lady Mary knew that the Scotch peasants were very superstitious, 
and she resolved on a desperate plan to make them leave the castle. 
They had not expected to find a woman when they came into the old 
deserted castle, and she resolved to confirm their already smoldering 
suspicion that she must be some evil spirit. Slowly she raised her 
white arm. "Go, ye men of Scotland ; thy English master hath died 
by the black rat of Wintolf ; go ye, before ye die also," she said, in 
solemn, wierd tones. 

Her pale face, the long black dress which she had put on since hear- 
ing of her husband's death, the man at her feet, his last words about 
the rat, and the death-like stillness of the castle confirmed their fears, 
and they fled from the awful scene out into the night and away from 
the lofty pile. 

The strain had been great on Lady Mary, and as the panel once 
more moved aside and Sir Roger hurried to her she clung to him 
sobbing, as is the way with women after the danger is past. 

"Noble Lady Mary," he said. "Dearest wife, thou hast saved me, 
and the danger is past ; now is the time to rejoice, not weep." 

"To think of the dangers thou must ever be exposed to, beloved, and 
we will not always be so fortunate as tonight," she cried. 



38 The St. Maky's Muse 

They were so engrossed that they did not hear the approach of sev- 
eral men until they reached the courtroom itself. 

"My brother !" cried Lady Mary. 

"Dear sister, do not look so frightened, for I bring thee good news. 
Her Majesty has discovered that he who lies here, the Duke of Nor- 
folk, is the guilty leader of the conspiracy against her royal self. To 
you, Earl of Essex, I bring the royal pardon." 



A School Day and a Holiday as Spent by Master Raleigh 



ESTELLE RAVENEL, '19, A P. 

(Second in contest.) 



Just what would Master Raleigh think if he could take a peep in a 
modern American schoolroom ? He would probably rub his eyes and 
look around as if dazed. "Could such changes possibly be real ?" he 
would think. Then standing there his mind would wander back to the 
time when he was a small boy, still going to school. He would see 
himself a little boy of ten, dressed in his queer little jacket and knick- 
erbockers, plodding his weary way to the village school, book in hand, 
hurriedly reciting some lines in Vergil, or repeating for the twentieth 
time the twenty-third Psalm. 

And then the village schoolhouse would stand out before him with 
its queer, narrow windows and doors. He would see again his play- 
mates gathered around in different groups, some busily talking, others 
engaged in hawking, while a few, only a few, of the very stupid ones 
sitting pouring over their lessons. Then the harsh voice of the school- 
master would be heard and in a few minutes he would be within the 
four-walls of the schoolroom, a small boy's prison. He would remem- 
ber the long, hard benches on which he used to sit, hour after hour, 
with no thought other than work. Cicero and Vergil would stand out 
before him beckoning him with warning fingers to bury himself amidst 
the knowledge of their contents. He would hear himself reciting on 
the Colloquium of Erasmus. And then the two long hours of writing. 
How tired his hand would get and how the master scolded when he 
made mistakes, but fear of this scolding would not allow him to stop 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 

for one minute's rest. Then a time equally as long spent in reading 
Fabian's Chronicles, together with a time spent upon the lute and 
Virquinalls would finish up his day ; and oh, how glad he was to be 
free onee more and in the lovely English twilight with his fellow play- 
mates. 

Then as he would sit there dreaming he would suddenly be awak- 
ened from reverie by a bell and would realize that he must be up and 
doing, for the world in which he had suddenly been thrown was a busy 
place. 

Supposing Sir Walter Raleigh to be a lover of children, we could 
easily imagine him following the crowd of merry children out of the 
schoolroom into the grounds, where the latter would soon be off with 
their games of baseball, hop-the-scoot, jump-the-rope. And again we 
would see the look of amazement come into Sir Walter's eyes, and in 
spite of himself his mind would wander again into the past, remem- 
bering well the joys a holiday brought forth. He would see himself 
off on a punt and would hear again the shouts of laughter from his 
playmates. What good times were these when, free from care and 
worry, he had entered on many a hunt coming home, his face beaming 
with his prize and hearing the words of praise from his father: "Son, 
thou art indeed a good shot. Thy bow shall heap many a word of 
praise upon thy head." He would remember how, on these holidays, 
he had often run away to see the Lord Admirals' players for which 
pleasure he would gladly receive the heaviest kind of punishment. 

Then the May Day exercises. He had almost forgotten them. This 
was a holiday truly to be remembered, for oh, the fun it had been ! 
He would see the lovely Queen of the May, dressed in her queenly 
robes, and her golden flowing hair and her appearance made more 
queenly by a wreath of flowers in her hair. Then as he would be 
living over all these things, the bell would suddenly ring again, and 
again he would start and rub his eyes, but alas ! Only to awake and 
find the same old humdrum world of today and himself an old man of 
the past. 



40 The St. Mary's Muse 

SHAKESPEARE TERCENTENARY FESTIVAL 

May 1, 1916 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh 

Prologue 
(Adapted from "Henry V.") 

Part I 

1. Gathering of villagers, lords, ladies, and mummers. 

2. Folk Dance: "Gathering Peascods." 

3. Old English Round: "Summer is Icumen in." 

4. Dance Around the May Pole. 

5. Song: "Honest Recreation." (Adapted.) 

6. Shepherdess Dance. 

7. Dance: "Bacca Pipes." 

8. Folk Song: "Mowing the Barley." 

9. Sleights Sword Dance. (A Yorkshire dance by twelve swordsmen, accom- 

panied by "King and Queen" and four "Toms.") 

Past II 

1. Greeting of a company of "Her Majesty's Players." 

2. O Mistress Mine." (Twelfth night.) 

3. Midsummer Night's Dream (Act V). 

Cast of Characters 

Theseus, Duke of Athens Josephine Wiison 

Lysander Lillian Riddick 

Demetrius Elizabeth Walker 

Philostrate, Master of Revels to Theseus Rena Harding 

Quince, a Carpenter — "Prologue" Katherine Bourne 

Snug, a Joiner — "Lion" Annie Cameron 

Bottum, a Weaver — "Pyramus" Lois Pugh 

Flute, a Bellows-mender — "Thisbe" Fannie Stallings 

Snout, a Tinker — -"Wall" Frances Waters 

Starveling, a Tailor — "Moonshine" Sue Lamb 

Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons Margaret Mann 

Hermia Sara Borden 

Helena Frances Geitner 

Oberon, King of the Fairies Lucile Anderson 

Titania, Queen of the Fairies Elizabeth Corbitt 

Puck, or Robin Goodfellow Annabelle Converse 

Fairies, Morris Dancers, Spirits of the Hearth. 

Bottum and his fellows present the play of "Pyramus and Thisbe" in honor 
of the wedding of Duke Theseus and Hippolyta. The Fairies bless the bridal. 
Puck speaks the epilogue. 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 

Songs and Dances 

1. Bergomask Dance, or Morris Jig. 

2. "Through the House." 

3. Fairies Revel. 

4. "Pipes of Pan": An interpretative dance of the seasons — Spring, Summer, 

Autumn, Winter. 

5. "Helen." 

6. Torch Dance. Epilogue Followed by "Wassail Song." 



Trje Shakespeare Festival 

PROLOGUE 

(Adapted from "Henry V.) 

Oh, for the power to make to live again 

The jovial pastimes of the olden days 

In Shakespeare's England. Then should you behold 

The festal gathering and the simple joy 

Of village folk upon a holiday 

Meet for enjoyment. But pardon, gentles all, 

The flat, unraised spirits that have dared 

With these poor assets to bring forth 

So great an object. Can this hillside be 

In truth a village green? Or may we cram 

Within this narrow ground the mad-cap pranks 

That did attend the bringing in of May? 

Oh, pardon! if we prone to error prove 

And let us, shadows of those bygone days, 

On your imaginary forces work. 

Suppose that here in holiday attire 

Are gathered simple village folk 

With lord and lady who were wont to grace 

The spacious times of great Elizabeth, 

Peddlers and shepherds, milkmaids, motley fools — 

Think, when you shall see these, they are real. 

I humbly pray you to admit the excuse 

Of time, of numbers, and due course of things 

Which cannot in their huge and proper life 

Be here presented. If we must perforce 

Wear skirts instead of doublet and good hose, 

Pardon th' unseemly failing, still be kind 

And eke out our performance with your mind, 

And of your kindness and your leniency 

Admit me chorus to this history, 

Who, prologue-like, your humble patience pray 

Gently to hear, kindly to judge our play. Annie S. Cameron. 



42 The St. Mary's Muse 

The Shakespeare TerceQter>ary Festival 

May 1, 1916. 

The Shakespeare Festival has come and gone — and we are wishing 
that it were still to be. We knew that we would have a good time, but 
we had not realized how very gay we could be when once we jumped 
over years and became the happy folk of Good Queen Bess's "Merrie 
England." 

When I say "we," I mean both teachers and girls, for the beauty 
of the festival motive is that it calls into activity every person of the 
community and depends upon the cooperation of all departments ; it 
belongs, not to the individual but to the individual in relation to the 
group. Our Shakespeare celebration was truly a festival by all for 
all. In the first place, the celebration was under the auspices of the 
three Literary Societies' and the English Department, committees of 
the Societies attending to details. The Departments of Art, Domestic 
Art, and Expression all helped, Miss Davis assisting Miss Thomas 
with "I. S. K". D." ; Mr. Owen trained the Sight-singing Class as 
chorus ; Miss Roberts gave much time and energy to the task of ac- 
companying, and Miss Abbott has our enthusiastic appreciation for 
her excellent orchestra made up of her violin pupils, Misses Jerger, 
Snyder, Sears, and Lassiter, who themselves worked hard and per- 
sistently preparing the music. It is Miss Barton who is to be heartily 
congratulated for getting up the dances, dances in which practically 
all the pupils took part and which were of most varied character from 
the comparatively simple folk dance to the aesthetic dances of the fairy 
episode of "M. S. KT. D." The Senior English Class were "Her 
Majesty's Players," while Elizabeth Lay, Jo Wilson, and Dolores Holt 
were the adapters of the old songs, "Honest Recreation" and the "Was- 
sail Song," and Annie Cameron of the "Prologue" — to be read else- 
where in these pages. The girls with hardly an exception willingly 
gave up recreation time to learning dances ; indeed, I have heard it 
whispered that Lent sped away this year faster than ever before. Of 
course Mr. Cruikshank saw to installation of lights and many other 
things. 

All of the properties were made on the place: torches, crooks, 
"Bacca Pipes," and most wonderful of all — the costumes. These the 



The St. Mary's Muse 43 

girls made themselves, and charmingly varied they were in style, 
color, and trimming, but always Elizabethan. Miss Thomas posted 
pictures of appropriate suits and dresses and the girls did the rest, in- 
venting patterns and manufacturing all kinds of holiday attire. The 
performers of the Sword Dance, "Bacca Pipes," and the Morris Jig 
were dressed like men and boys of an old English vilage, the jiggers 
having bells on their ankles. The shepherdesses were very lovely in 
full brightly colored skirts, black bodices and white caps, and carried 
flower-twined crooks'. Costumes of village tapster and barmaid, ped- 
dlers, constables, town bailiff, scarlet clad minstrels, jesters and 
fairies ; of such village maids as "Sweet Anne Page," or matrons like 
her merry mother of Windsor ; dignified townsmen, and lords and 
ladies resplendent in velvet and satin with sleeves slashed and puffed, 
the ladies in pointed waists and farthingales, the men in doublets' and 
capes, and both genuinely Tudor in ruffs of every proper style — all 
these were designed and made by the wearers themselves. This was 
also true of the apparel of the "M. S. N. D." troupe, from Theseus' to 
"Lion," whose visage fierce which "gentles all do fear" was created in 
the Art Room — and the Art Room wolf of many years' fame was 
Moonshine's faithful dog. 

The Festival took place in the Grove on the right-hand side of the 
Auditorium, where there is a natural stage large enough for some two 
hundred people. About this stage, by 8:15 on May Day, there had 
collected a goodly crowd of five hundred or more of our friends of the 
city, when the many arc lights were flashed on and the celebration be- 
gan with the blowing of trumpets by the two heralds (Velma Jutkins 
and Hat-tie A. Copeland) and the speaking of the prologue by Rena 
Harding, a prologue praying in Shakespearian language for the imag- 
ination of the audience to amend all deficiencies, such as skirts for 
trunks and hose, and to hear and judge the play with gentleness and 
kindness. The prologue explained that the general intention of the 
festival was the presentation of some forms of village merrymaking 
of Shakespeare's day to do honor to the Stratford villager who became 
world king of drama and poetry. 

Then followed at once the gathering of the village folk, who made 
way with bows and greetings for the gentry — my lady of the manor, 



44 The St. Mary's Muse 

the good town bailiff, the master of the revels and a numerous train 
in which were to be found such Shakespearian characters as Queen 
Katherine (Miss Glen), Hamlet (Miss Davis, richly dressed in black 
velvet), and Ophelia. Among them was Miss Lee, who in silver lace 
and jewels was of course a handsome and courtly figure. Perhaps 
this natural scene was the most realistic and most beautiful of all, so 
bright it was with vivid color and so joyous with the spirit of true 
mirth. 

The lady of the manor (Miss Thomas) and the announcer of the 
sports (Mr. Owen, a true jester in cap and bells and brilliant garb) 
then set on the revels, in the which all gaily joined. During dance 
and song the festival folk sat in groups' on the grass, and between the 
numbers, peddlers cried their wares, the hobby-horses, ridden by 
Annie Cameron and Katherine Bourne, trotted and galloped about, 
and once the constables seized a "pick-purse" and tied him to a tree. 

As there are no stars in a festival, it is difficult to make specific 
mention of particular parts. "Mowing the Barley" was quaintly 
acted and clearly sung; the Sword Dance, intricate and complicated 
as was the formation of the several different "locks," demanded great- 
est skill, "Bacea Pipes" and the Morris jig were executed with nimble 
quickness, while the Torch Dance was most spectacular. In the 
"Pipes of Pan" the class in seesthetic dancing were light and graceful 
and so was Julia Bryan in "Helen." The Sub-Preparatory Depart- 
ment formed the skipping throng around the May Pole and Miss 
Katie's children of the Primary were fairies. 

The music included besides traditional pieces Edward German's 
three Henry VIII dances and the Mendelssohn setting for the con- 
clusion of "M. S. ST. D." 

The act from that unique creation of Shakespeare's genius was pre- 
sented as nearly as practicable as it would have been given out-of- 
doors in his own time, the costumes being Elizabethan and the stage 
properties most meagre. The tragical mirth of "the lamentable 
comedy and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisbe" was as absurd 
and as delightful as always and forever; truly "the passion of loud 
laughter never shed more merry tears." 

From all sides we learn that our play "did well beguile the heavy 



The St. Mary's Muse 45 

gait of night," and that we did indeed succeed in re-creating some- 
thing of the spirit and the detail of the days of the great poet whom 
we delight to honor, so that our friends could not but obey Puck's 
appeal to think that in truth they had but slumbered and had dreamed 
the village gathering, joyous dance and song, fairy revel and progress 
of stately lord and lady of those golden far-off days were once more 
real and present, once more of our sober work-a-day world. 

E. W. T. 



PROGRAM FOR COMMENCEMENT PL0Y 

"AS YOU LIKE IT" 
May 21, 1916 

Duke, living in banishment Anne Brinley 

Frederick, his brother and usurper of his dominion .Katherine Stewart 

Lords attending on the banished Duke: 

Amiens Frances Tillotson 

Jaques Aline Hughes 

LeBeau, a courtier attending upon Frederick Agnes Pratt 

Charles, wrestler to Frederick Carobell Stewart 

Sons of Sir Rowland de Boys: 

Oliver Alice Latham 

Jaques Josephine Frohne 

Orlando Jane Norman 

Adam, servant to Oliver Nancy Woolford 

Touchstone, a clown Dolores Holt 

Shepherds: 

Corin Rubie Thorn 

Silvius Helen Laughinghouse 

William, a country fellow, in love with Audrey Lucile Anderson 

Rosalind, daughter to the banished Duke Lois Pugh 

Celia, daughter to Frederick Elizabeth Corbitt 

Phebe, a shepherdess Julia Bryan 

Audrey, a country wench Annabelle Converse 

Attendants. 

Given under the direction of Miss Florence C. Davis, Director of the Ex- 
pression Department and of the Dramatic Club. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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will be ready May 22, 1916. 

$3 the copy. 
Subscriptions are invited. 



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Ten per cent off to College Girls 



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Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
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Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayettevilie St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
"We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

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the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
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Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
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1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


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WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
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S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

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and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

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H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

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Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnw Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

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OHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

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Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining' place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 



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HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
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Phones 228 


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Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
Phone 123 

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ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

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Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 


B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 


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Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

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Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


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ancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
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Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 



DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

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Via "WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVttLE 
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Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

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Norfolk, Va. 



Double Daily Express Service 

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location Central for the Carolina*. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School 



RALEIGH, N. C, 

(for girls and young women) 



SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



. Mary s 

offers 
nstruction 
in these 
epartmenls 



iIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1916, 



TIE COLLEGE 

2. TEE MUSIC. DEPARTMENT 

3. THE ART DEPARTMENT 

J h THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

5. THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPAIITMENT 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses, 

Twenty-eight Members of the Facility. 



~ Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New* 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Sail and 
Dotmitories, 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For. Catalogue and other information address 

Bev. George W. La]}, D. C. L,, 

Rector. 



■•• \ ". > ' . ' '■■■ •• ■■' ■ ■'■ '■■ % ■■'■ -..•■ 







$re=Commencement Jlumfcer 

ifflap, 1916 




a 55 



5Q 






The St. Mary's Muse. 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



foL. XX May, 1916 No. 9 



The Con)ri)encen)er)t Progran) 



5:00 p. 


m., 


May 22, 11:00 a. 


m., 


3:00 p. 


m., 


4:30 p. 


m., 


8:30 p. 


m., 


9:30 p. 


m., 


May 23, 11:00 a. 


m., 



Saturday, May 20, 8:15 p. m., Annual Recital of the Elocution Department 

in the Auditorium, "As You Like It." 
Sunday, May 21, 11:00 a. m., Commencement Sermon in the Chapel, by 

the Rev. Mercer P. Logan, D.D., Rector of 
St. Paul's Church, Charleston, S. C. 
Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 
Monday, May 22, 11:00 a. m., Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in 

the Studio. 
Annual Alumnae meeting in the Parlor. 
Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 
Tuesday, May 23, 11:00 a. m., Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Mr. James H. Dillard, 
D.C.L., LL.D. Closing Exercises in the 
Chapel. 

The 74th Commencement promises to be of interest in many ways. 
The presentation of u As You Like It" by the Elocution Department, 
under the direction of Miss Florence Davis, will mark the third and 
concluding act in St. Mary's celebration of the Shakespeare Tercen- 
tenary. The Commencement Sermon will be preached by Dr. Logan 
of Charleston, a member of the General Board of Religious Educa- 
tion and long prominent in Church affairs. The Annual Address at 
the Graduating Exercises will be delivered by Dr. Dillard of Char- 
lottesville, Va., Director of the Slater Fund, member of the Southern 
Education Board, etc., etc., and a prominent educator. 

The Class is smaller than it has been for several years, numbering 
ten, as follows : 

Katherine Wimberly Bourne Tarboro, N. C. 

Annie Sutton Cameron Hillsboro, N. C. 

Mary Auning Floyd St. Stephens, S. C. 



184 The St. Mary's Muse 



Selena Emma Galbraith Waver ly Mills, S. C. 

Frances Royer Geitner Hickory, N. C. 

Rena Hoyt Harding Washington, N. C. 

Susan Elizabeth Lamb Henderson, N. C. 

Fannie Marie Stallings Suffolk, Va. 

Josephine Savilla Wilson San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

Helen Cherry Wright Boardman, N. C. 

Miss Wright and Miss Floyd will also receive diplomas in Piano in 
the Music Department. 

The Commencement Marshals' are: Alice Cohn Latham, '17, Epsi- 
lon Alpha Pi, Chief; Martha Wright and Elmyra Jenkins, of the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi; Sara Shellman Bacon and Katharine Drane, of 
Sigma Lambda; and Nellie C. Rose and Estelle Ravenel, of Alpha 
Rho. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



How Dick "Found Himself." 

Rubie Thorn, '18. 

Richard Hiram Ball, better known at the College as "Hi Ball 
Dick," because of his ability to get out of a tight place in a hurry, sat 
in his clubroom and thought. Dick's father was wealthy and had in- 
dulged the boy too much during his college career for his own good. 
Dick was popular with "the fellows" and managed to pass' his Exams, 
and get through, but since June he realized that he was a disappoint- 
ment to his father because he had no definite purpose in life, and 
while he did pretend to be a junior partner in the law firm, it 
amounted to about two hours work a day, with the rest of the time 
spent yachting, golfing, or at the club. Most of Dick's friends were 
settled now and the younger crowd ceased to interest him, girls as 
well as boys. On this particular evening he was especially miserable. 
What could have been worse than to have been a disappointment to 
his father ? This had never loomed up before him to any extent until 
he no longer had anything to divert his mind. Even now his regret 
amounted to little for it failed to stimulate a worthy resolution. He 



The St. Mary's Muse 185 



: merely knew that he was disgusted with the situation and he resolved 
to leave home. Everything repelled him. 



It was a beautiful spring morning. Nell Page had been up on the 
'imountain to carry breakfast to poor Sallie Anne, who had been sick 
for some time. As she walked briskly down the path in the exhilarat- 
ing mountain air she looked the picture of health and in her firm 
steady steps, as well as in her girlish eyes, was the strength of a 
woman. She was beautiful too in her fresh pale pink gingham, and 
the very swing of the large leghorn hat, with pink roses and black 

> velvet that she carried in her hand, showed the more aesthetic and 
artistic nature of the girl. Many a girl would have been frightened 
at the sight of the large black dog that ran out of the woods before her 
path, but Nell's first impulse was to rush up and throw her arms 
around his neck and exclaim, "You beautiful creature; where did you 
come from ?" On looking up she saw standing before her a young 
man, dressed in hunting costume, with a gun on his shoulder. It 
never occurred to Nell to be embarrassed and she looked straight into 
his eyes and said, "Is this your dog ? He certainly is a beauty. I 
was just wondering who he could belong to." She was so sure that 
the dog did belong to the man that she didn't even wait for him to 

I answer, but in her simple unsophisticated way made some trivial 
remark about the dog (the tenderness and loyal devotion to all living 
things, in her nature, took the form of a special fondness for dogs) 
and before he knew, she was gone. 

Dick was almost stunned at the sight of such a beautiful creature 
among such rough, typical mountaineers, and when she had disap- 
peared he was not quite sure that, after all, she might not have been 
just a naiad of the forest. After some days in this "end of creation" 
he came to understand that she was just about the most real thing 
there, and that it was she who made whatever little sunshine of civili- 
zation was on the mountain. The girl interested Dick as nothing 
had interested him for a long time, and hearing that she was from the 
same city as an old schoolmate of his he immediately wrote to find out 
something about her. The mountaineers didn't know anything about 
her except that she seemed to be an angel of love sent to them, and 



186 The St. Mary's Muse 



when he was lucky enough to get a few minutes conversation with 
her she was always so forgetful of herself in her interest about other 
things that there seemed no possibility of finding out anything of her 
life history. When, finally, the letter came from his friend he was 
more puzzled than ever. Bill said that Nell was a good friend of his, 
and that just after she made her debut and was most popular, she 
went on a camp to the mountains, and that a few weeks after she 
was packed up and off to the mountains again with, as he expressed it, 
"some foolish notions about helping the people there." For such a 
state of mind to belong to a being such as she, was beyond Dick's com- 
prehension. It was a problem that he just couldn't solve. Why 
should Nell Page be willing to give up her luxurious society life and 
come up there to teach some little ragamuffin mountain children ? She 
was just out of place and the state of affairs puzzled him no little. 

Three months passed. Although he didn't realize it, Richard Ball 
was changed to quite a degree. He had left home because he was 
tired of his life and wanted to get away from it all. Almost uncon- 
sciously he had made his way to the mountains. His life, since the 
night he left home, all seemed like a great dream to him, and he awoke 
one morning to find himself wondering — wondering why he had come 
to that place, anyway; wondering where he was going when he left 
(surely not back home), and wondering what he was going to do when 
he left, and still puzzling about the girl. Somehow the thought of 
leaving caused him some pain. Dick had come to love the mountains 
and the inhabitants of the mountains had become his friends. He 
had been a perfect boy when he came there, but now he was a man. 

Dan Morley was 1ST ell's most advanced pupil, and he always shared 
her joys and sorrows. 

Dan was Dick's friend, too. They had great hunting trips to-j 
gether, and one night, in the early fall, they were camping on top of 
Busbee. After supper was over the boy and man sat facing each 
other, with the camp-fire between them, and the red glow of light 
brought out distinctly the features' of each. Dick's collegemates would 
scarcely have recognized him if they had seen the different expres- 
sions on his face as Dan, in his boyish way, unconscious of what an 
effect his words were having, told how Miss Nellie hadn't been so 



J 



The St. Mary's Muse 18 Y 

happy as usual for the last few days. "You see, there's lots she wants 
to do that she just can't." Dan, himself, really didn't understand. 
He was quoting her, but Dick understood. He understood all. 

On his way home Dick stopped by Nell's school, while Dan and the 
dog went on up the mountain to the cabin. It was quite a crime for 
aim to interrupt her work, so only a few words were allowed. 
"Nell," he said, "I'm going away this afternoon." 
At the expression on her face he added quickly, "not for good, but 
to prepare myself to help you. I understand. It would be so much 
Basier to help them if you had someone to help you. I'm coming back 
and then we'll work together." 



Trje Song of tbe OaK Tree 



Dolores Holt. 

"Goodness !" sighed Betty, "I'm glad school's over ! I do so dote 

*upon Saturday afternoons. It might as well not be Saturday today, 

'cause I've got to go think up an old original story for English ! Be- 

plieve I'll go down behind the auditorium, where it's grand and quiet." 

* "Betty, come on ; let's order some ice cream," called Laura. 

9 Ice cream ! Oh, what a wonderfully cooling thought — but no ! the 

• "comp." must be written ! 

1 "No, sir ! I've got to write my story. Of course I can put it off 
'until the last minute." 

a This danger past, Betty hurried on to avoid any further temptation. 
3 It was so cool and delightful down behind the auditorium that Betty 

(Soon fell asleep, right under the biggest, oldest tree in the grove. 
^Presently she heard a voice above her singing softly. The harmonious 

sounds were like the weird minors of a violin. She was rather sur- 
prised to discover that it was none other than the oak tree, who was 
liorooning an ancient Indian lullaby. 

c "Listen," said the oak tree, "and I'll tell you the story of Yona- 
j iossee and Tacquamina, as it was told me by my father. 

"Long, long ago, all down where that road is, there was a lake, the 

lake of Sky Blue Waters the Indians called it, and it was there Yona- 

lossee wooed the captive maid Tacquamina. 

"One morning, just as the sun with all its glory rose slowly above 



188 The St. Mary's Muse 



the eastern horizon, driving the mist of Indian summer before him, 
Yonalossee stood at the door of his wigwam, listening for the sound of 
a long, sweet bird-note that had a minute before awakened him. 
Finally he was rewarded for, deep in the forest, again came the 
peculiar bird-note, this time loud and shrill, dying away to a faint sob. ! 
In an instant Yonalossee was speeding into the forest toward the lake 
of Sky Blue Waters. Suddenly he heard a mocking laugh and the 
sound of a canoe sliding into the water. He parted the bushes in 
time to see Tacquamina push off from shore and paddle swiftly out 
on the water. 

"She saw the slight shadow of displeasure that darkened his noble 
forehead, but Tacquamina was not afraid of his anger. Farther up 
the shore Yonalossee found his canoe, and with a few powerful 
strokes sent the slight birch-bark craft side by side with Tacquamina. 
She stepped agilly into his boat ; he went toward her. 

" 'Will Little Bird always fly away ?' 

"The color mounted to her cheeks and a troubled look stole into her 
dark eyes, but she did not answer him directly. 'Take Tacquamina 
over the rapids today, Yonalossee — safely over the wild rapids — then 
Yonalossee shall have — a kiss.' 

"Silently the Indian looked at her; he loved her, this beautiful 
Cree maiden, and he was determined to win her love. 

"Soon the first currents of the torrent shook the boat and inter- 
rupted his thoughts. Tacquamina watched, fascinated, as Yonalos- 
see's powerful arms guided the canoe skillfully among the rocks and 
over the treacherous' waters. As they turned a sharp curve another 
boat faced them. 

" 'Migissowham,' cried Tacquamina. Yonalossee steeled himself 
for a fight with the most hated enemy of the Sioux tribe. 

"Migissowham threw back his handsome head, steadied his canoe, 
raised his knife, and the two Indians closed. 

"Tacquamina watched intently and finally, as Yonalossee's knife 
sank deep, Migssowham swayed and fell. She uttered a low moan. 

" 'Migissowham is dead,' she cried, 'and so is the heart of Little 
Bird.' 

"Yonalossee raised his arm to strike her, but her sad face arrested 
him. 



The St. Mary's Muse 189 

" 'I had hoped to steal your heart, too, Taequamina.' 

" 'Taequamina cannot forget her people whom your tribe has 

ikilled, and from whom you took her captive. Migissowham was my 

chief. He had come for Little Bird. The duty of a daughter of the 

Crees is to be true. Little Bird has sworn to kill the murderer of 

her chief. She has failed, for she cannot kill Yonalossee; therefore 

| must she die. Little Bird has called to you from the forest for the 

i last time, till we meet again in the happy hunting ground.' 

"The canoe had floated slowly beside the body of Migissowham. 
1 Taequamina hastily drew the knife from his side and raised it to stab 
herself. 

"'Taequamina!' The knife fell into the water. Migissowham 
had regained consciousness for a brief moment and was struggling to 
i speak to her. 'Little Bird — Pearl Feather dies ; the last of his tribe,' 
he faltered. 'He makes you free; do not kill, Little Bird ; fly home!' 
"Happily, and yet with a tinge of sadness, Taequamina nestled 
1 close to her new chief and brave, and slowly Yonalossee paddled back 
1 to camp." 

Betty awoke with a start; the breeze had ceased and with it the 
soft voice of the lofty oak. 



The Night Wind 



Annie S. Cameron, '16. 

"What are you singing, Wind of Night, 

Over the tree-tops high? 

What do you sing 

While the wee stars swing 

And the pale moon rides the sky, 

And the world, wrapt deep in a dreamless sleep, 

Rocks to your lullaby? 

What are you singing, Wind of Night, 

There where the stars are hung? 

Is it the song 

Which for ages long 

Under the sky you have sung? 

Is it the same weird, mystic song 

You sang when the world was young? 



190 The St. Maky's Muse 



What are you singing, Wind of Night, 

Under the starry dome? 

Sing you to me 

Of the days to be, 

Of the wondrous days to come? 

What can you know, as to and fro 

Over the hills you roam? 

Whisper your song to me, Wind of the Night; 

Wondrous voice that is given, 

That I may know 

What the wild winds blow 

Under the sky, star riven, 

The wonderful things that the Night Wind sings 

Under the low-hung heaven. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



March 23 — Organ Pupils' Recital 

This year, on account of the large number of Certificate and 
Diploma Recitals to be given in the limited time before Commence- 
ment, the regular Thursday Afternoon Pupil's Recitals were omitted 
and a series of public recitals has taken their place. 

The first of these was given in the Chapel on Thursday afternoon, 
March 23d, by Mr. Owen's advanced organ pupils, and they were a 
credit to his teaching. The organ pupils were assisted by Martha 
Wright, whose singing gave a great deal of pleasure. The recital 
was greatly enjoyed by a large audience. 

The program in full was as follows : 

At Twilight Stebbens 

Miss Carobell Stewart 

The Cadinette Shepherd Song J ores 

Miss Violet Bray 

Sonata, E minor Rogers 

Mr. Frederick Staudt, Jr. 

"Send Out Thy Light" Hawley 

Miss Martha Wright 

Introduction and Scherzo from Suite 205 Bartlett 

Miss Helen Wright 



The St. Mary's Muse 191 

March 25 — Informal Expression Pupils' Recital 

Several things happened to keep the Saturday nights during Lent 
from becoming long and tiresome. One of these was the volleyball 
game played on the 19 th, and another was the informal recital given 
by the Expression pupils in the Auditorium on Saturday night, 
March 25th. The entertainment proved very enjoyable and everyone 
did well. Those deserving special mention were Lois Pugh, who re- 
cited some poems by Riley, Anne Brinley, who recited "The High- 
wayman," by Alfred ISToyes ; Annabelle Converse, who recited Kip- 
ling's "Wee Willie Winkie" ; and Josephine Frohne, who was' splen- 
did in a monologue, "Keeping a Seat at the Theatre." 

The program in full was as follows: 

Group of Poems Gertrude Merrimon 

"The Highwayman" (by Alfred Noyes) Anne Brinley 

"Wee Willie Winkie" (by Kipling) Annabelle Converse 

"For Love of Mary Ellen" Aline Hughes 

Poems by Riley Lois Pugh 

"Mandalay" and "If" Jane Norman 

Poems Velma Jutkins 

"The Lie" Aline Taylor 

"Keeping a Seat at the Theatre" (monologue) Josephine Frohne 

March 26— Miss Patsy Smith's Talk 

On Sunday night, March 26, a short and interesting talk was 

made in the parlor by Miss Patsy Smith, who graduated at St. 

Mary's in 1912. Since her St. Mary's days Miss Smith has been 

quite interested in Junior Auxiliary work and it was at the request 

of Miss Claudia Hunter, the Secretary of the Woman's Auxiliary of 

the Diocese of North Carolina, that she spoke. The subject of the 

talk was the new St. Luke's Hospital which it is hoped will be built 

at Tokyo, Japan. 

J ' r March 27— Volley Ball Game 

On Monday afternoon, March 27th, there was a volleyball game in 

the "Gym." between the Junior teams of the Sigmas and Mus. The 

line-up was as follows : 

Mus. Sigmas. 

Nina Burke (Captain). Lucy Jensen (Captain). 

Randolph Hill. Margaret Springs. 

Harriet Barber. Elizabeth Cross. 

Muriel Dougherty. Mary Hoke. 

Lillias Shepherd. Virginia Royster. 

Virginia Williams. Josephine Frohne. 



192 The St. Maey's Muse 



The game was an exciting one, and Lucy Jensen and Mary Hoke 
worked hard with the rest of the Sigmas to come out victorious, hut 
Nina Burke, with her splendid playing and the rest of her team, 
proved too much for them and the score at the end of the second half 
was 48 to 36, in favor of the Mus. 

March 30 — Piano Recital. Miss Martha Wright 

The first Certificate Recital of the year was given on March 30th 
hy Miss Martha Wright, pupil of Miss Dowd, assisted by Mr. James 
Bonner, baritone. Miss Wright's program, composed entirely of 
modern composition with the exception of the Scarlatti number, was 
most interesting, varied, and well arranged. Her rendering of it 
showed appreciative interpretation, clear, sure technique, good 
phrasing, and considerable temperament. 

Mr. Bonner's interpretation of the beautiful Tchaikowsky "Sere- 
nade" and of Cadman's "Land of the Sky-blue Water" was indeed 
good. 

The program was : 

I. 

Allemande, Gavotte and Musette Eugen d' Albert 

Capriccio, from Sonata in F Domenico Scarlatti 

II. 

Dawn Friml 

Pan. Pastorale Godard 

Taren telle G& Moszkowski 

III. 

Don Juan's Serenade Tchaikowsky 

Land of the Sky-blue Water Cadman 

Mr. Bonner 

IV. 

Prseludium, Op. 14 MacDowell 

La Soiree dans Grenade Debussy 

The Water Wagtail Cyril Scott 

V. 

Concerto, A minor, Op. 16 Grieg 

Allegro molto moderato 

(Second Piano, Miss Dowd) 



The St. Mary's Muse 193 

April 6 — Organ Recital. Miss Helen Wright 

On Thursday evening, April 6th, the second Certificate Recital of 
the year was held in the Chapel. Those who were present at Helen 
Wright's piano recital last year looked forward to the evening with 
pleasure, and they were not disappointed, for she showed herself to 
be as much at home at the organ as at the piano. She was assisted by 
the choir. 

The News and Observer said of the recital : 

Miss Helen Wright's work in her certificate organ recital given in St. 
Mary's Chapel, Thursday evening, April 6th, was characterized by dignity 
and efficiency. The "Passacalia Theme et Fugatum," in C minor, by Bach, 
was given with remarkably good pedaling, with fluent technique, and clean 
phrasing. 

The "Premiere Sonate," by Salome, a new work to most of the listeners, 
was played in stately rhythm and with full-chord effects. The "Introduction 
and Scherzo," by Bartlett, again called for skilled pedaling, for swift use of 
the stops, for advanced finger technique, and for considerable mentality. 
These demands were ably met by Miss Wright, who, indeed, played with such 
ease that the difficulties of the composition were not apparent. Miss Wright 
showed more temperament, and was probably at her best, in the lovely "Per- 
sian Suite," by Stoughton: (a) The Courts of Jamshyd, Alia Marcia; (b) The 
Garden of Irma, Lento; (c) Saki, Allegro Scherzando. In the rendering of 
this composition she succeeded in getting real orchestral effects. 

Miss Wright has been for several years a pupil of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, 
Director of Voice and Organ at St. Mary's School. She was assisted in her 
recital by St. Mary's Choir; Miss Mildred Jerger, violin; Dr. George Summey, 
cello, who gave a beautiful rendering of Gounod's beautiful anthem "By 
Babylon's Wave," Psalm 137. 

The program in full was as follows: 

I. 
Passacalia Theme et Fugatum, in C moll Johann Sebastian Bach 

II. 

Premiere Sonate, Op. 25 Theodore Salome 

Andante Maestoso 

III. 
Introduction and Scherzo, Op. 205 Homer N. Bartlett 

IV. 
By Babylon's Wave — Psalm 137 Gounod 

V. 
Persian Suite Stoughton 

a. The Courts of Jamshyd, Alia Marcia 

b. The Garden of Irma, Lento 

c. Saki, Allegro Scherzando 



194 The St. Maky's Muse 

April 10— Field Day 

The annual spring Athletic Meet went off with great success Mon- 
day afternoon, April 10th, at 2 :45, on the athletic field. There were 
about forty contestants' in all, very evenly matched. For the success 
we must thank Miss Barton and the two athletic presidents, Annie 
Robinson, Sigma, and Anne Brinley, Mu. The members themselves 
have never shown more spirit or enthusiasm, and as for the contest- 
ants, they surely make each club feel prouder than ever. 

The program was as follows : 
Jump the Bean Bag: 

First— M. Wilson (Mu), 8. 

Second — H. Brigham (Mu), 5. 

Third— N. Woolford (Sigma), 3. 

Fourth— R. Hill (Mu), 1. 

Final score: Mu, 14; Sigma, 3. 

Three-legged Race: 

First— H. Barber and R. Hill (Mu), 8. 
Second — M. Dougherty and M. Wilson (Mu), 5. 
Third — N. Woolford and A. Robinson (Sigma), 3. 
Fourth — R. Thorn and M. Kirtland (Sigma), 1. 
Final score: Mu, 13; Sigma, 4. 

Running Broad Jump: 

E. Askew (Mu), 12 feet 9 inches 8 

R. Robbins (Sigma), 12 feet 3 inches 5 

N. Woolford (Sigma), 12 feet 1 inch 3 

N. Burke (Mu), 12 feet 1 

Final score: Mu, 9; Sigma, 8. 

Boundary Ball: Sigmas scored 20 points. 

Running High Jump: 
K. Drane \ 

C. Holmes ( (Mu) g fee( . g inches 17 

E. Askew I 
C. Paul ) 

Goal Throwing: 

A. Taylor (Sigma), 10 throws out of 10 trials; Sigma, 20 points. 

Relay Race (Won by Mus) : 

Final score: Mu, 73; Sigma, 55. 



The St. Mary's Muse 195 

April 12 — First Team Basketball Game 

On Wednesday afternoon, April 12th, the final game of basketball 
between the first teams was played. 
The line-up was : 

Sigma. Mu. 

E. Ravenel Jumping Center H. Brigham 

N. Woolford (Capt.) Side Center C. Holmes 

M. Hoke Forward E. Walker 

E.Waddell Forward A. Brinley 

A. Robinson Guard N. Burke 

M. Mullins Guard L. Beatty (Capt.) 

It was one of the hardest fought games of the season. The Mu 
team work was wonderful, and Annie Robinson's and Laura Beatty's 
i guarding should make their clubs proud of them. For alertness no 
one could beat Nancy Woolford, M. Mullins, ]ST. Burke, and 0. 
Holmes, and Helen Brigham seemed everywhere at once with E. 
Ravenel right behind her. Mary Hoke's first trial at a first team game 
proved quite a success, and very probably next year she will be a 
member instead of a substitute on the first team. E. Walker's, E. 
Waddell's, and A. Brinley's goals were most thrilling, as they always 
are. The final score was' 24 to 14, in favor of the Mus. 

April 15 — Second Team Basketball Game 

On Saturday night, April 15th, at 8 o'clock, in the Gym., there was 
a basketball game between the second teams of Mu and Sigma. The 
line-up was as follows : 

Mu. Sigma. 

E. B. Lay (Capt.) Jumping Center C. Stewart 

A. Lay Forward A. Taylor 

E. Davis Forward J. Frohne 

C. Gilmer Guard M. Kirtland 

C. Paul Guard F. Tillotson (Capt.) 

The game was a most exciting one. Nancy Lay, a substitute, did 
especially good work, and Josephine Erohne's basket from the center 
was "a beauty." The final score was 10 to 4, in favor of the Sia*mas. 



196 The St. Mary's Muse. 

April 24 — Easter Egg Hunt 

On Monday evening, April 24th, immediately after Chapel the 
usual Easter Egg-hunt was held in the grove. There seemed to be an 
unusually large number of eggs to be found and there were several 
minutes of wild excitement while the searching was going on. In a 
short while, however, the discoveries became fewer and farther be- 
tween and finally everyone gathered to see who had won the prize. 
This, in the form of a large white rabbit, was presented to Henry Lay, 
who had found the goodly number of twenty-one eggs. 

April 27 — Expression Recital. Miss Jane Norman 

On Thursday evening, April 27th, a delightful Certificate Recital 
was given in the auditorium by Miss Jane Norman, assisted by Miss 
Elizabeth Corbitt, whose singing added greatly to the pleasure of the 
evening. The program was well chosen and pleasantly varied and 
Miss Norman proved herself a worthy representative of Miss Davis's 
training, and showed that she well merits her certificate. 

The News and Observer said of the recital: 

The expression recital at St. Mary's, Thursday evening, given by Miss Jane 
Norman, certificate pupil of Miss Florence C. Davis, was a most successful 
and interesting one, her program showing her versatility and admirable range 
of tone. 

"The Mallet's Masterpiece," an unusual type of dramatic reading, was given 
with real power and excellent voice control. 

The three Kipling poems — all so different — the philosophic "If," the ring- 
ing "Mandalay," and the organ-like "Recessional," were each accorded their 
full values. 

The most popular number of the evening was the Beatrice Herford mono- 
logue, "The Frivolous Side." This Miss Norman rendered with real charm 
and a delicious girlish appreciation of its comedy. 

The quiet humor of the last number, "The Absent Guest," rounded out a 
program that showed Miss Norman's talent and Miss Davis's excellent method. 

Assisting Miss Norman was Miss Elizabeth Corbitt, soprano, pupil of Miss 
Zona Shull. She sang with artistic finish. 

The accompaniments were played by Miss Louise Seymour of the Faculty. 



The St. Mary's Muse 197 

This was the program : 

I. 

The Mallett's Masterpiece Edward Peple 

II. 

Tosca: "Vissi D'Arte, Vissi D'Amore" Puccini 

III. 

The Frivolous Side (monologue) Beatrice Herford 

I If -) IV. 

Mandalay C Rudyard Kipling 

Recessional ) V. 

Song of the Shepherd Lehl Rimsky-Korsakon 

! The Cry of Rachael Salter 

Miss Corbitt 

VI. 

The Absent Guest Roy Rolf Gilsen 

April 29— St. Cecilia Concert 

On Saturday evening, April 29th, the annual concert of the St. Ce- 
cilia Club was given in St. Mary's Auditorium, under the direction of 
'Mr. Owen. This was one of the several occasions when the Club has 
i afforded a delightful evening to a large and appreciative audience. 
I The concert on Saturday evening was especially enjoyed. St. Mary's 
was well represented in the recital, for not only was it under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Owen, but Miss Abbott and Miss Shull took part in the 
program. 

The News and Observer said of the concert: 

On Saturday evening the St. Cecilia Club, under the direction of Mr. Owen, 
;gave a most delightful recital in St. Mary's auditorium. The club, maintain- 
ing the high standard of musicianship which it has held since its organization 
with Mr. Owen two seasons ago, gave a concert that will stand out with espe- 
cial prominence in the season's musical offerings. The entire program was 
) beautifully rendered. The Viennese Serenade was possibly the most artistic 
number. The lovely chorus, upheld by the appreciative accompaniment of 
their assistants, gave an artistic and exquisite rendition of the Stevenson 
; Serenade. 

Mr. James Bonner showed, in his understanding, sympathetic and tempera- 
mental singing, the beginnings of a great artistic future. 

Miss Shull, always the artist, was at her best in Sherwood Forest obbligatos. 
Her rendition was charming and tone beautiful. 

Miss Abbott played with her usual artistic excellence and finish. Dr. Sum- 
mey gave charming and efficient support. Mrs. Frederick Staudt showed ex- 
cellent pianism and gave that sympathetic and intellectual help that adds so 
much to the success of a concert. 



198 The St. Mary's Muse 



April 29 — Junior- Senior Banquet 

The Seniors have never enjoyed any entertainment more than the 
"banquet" given them by the Juniors Saturday evening, April 29th. 
The decorations were of dogwood, the Senior colors being green and 
white, while lavendar and purple, the Junior colors, were brought in 
effectively. Kewpie cards with tiny diplomas were used as place 
cards. 

The banquet opened with a song of greeting by Frances Tillotson. 
After a six-course luncheon, artistically served, reflectoscope pictures 
of school happenings were shown, to the enjoyment of all. 

But the great event of the evening was the presentation of "The 
Mad Tea-Party Revised," with Elizabeth Corbitt as the March Hare, 
Dolores Holt as the Hatter, Annabelle Converse as the Dormouse, 
Lois Pugh as the Mock Turtle, and Violet Bray as Alice. This served 
as a delightful reminder of the two chief entertainments before 
Christmas : the Faculty production of "Alice in Wonderland," and 
Mr. Owen's production of "The Mikado." The little play was an in- 
genious adaptation of these two and delighted its audience with amus- 
ing incidents and pointed songs. 

The Seniors received as souvenirs, dolls representing their future 
calling in life, and also copies of "The Mad Tea-Party Revised." The 
most delightful evening ended with expressions of appreciation by 
the Senior, Sophomore, Freshman, and "Prep." Presidents, best 
wishes to the Class of 1916 from Alice Latham, President of the 
Junior Class ; also with toasts to the Seniors by Miss Katie and Miss 
Thomas. The guests were delighted with the evening, and thought 
the party the prettiest thing given at St. Mary's in a long time. 

The whole entertainment showed a wonderful amount of efficiency, 
originality, and interest on the part of the Junior Class, and spoke 
well for the success of next year's entertainments. F. R. G., '16. 

May 3 — Certificate Recital. Miss Martha Wright 

On Wednesday evening, May 3d, Miss Martha Wright, certificate 
pupil of Mr. R. B. Owen, gave a charming voice recital, assisted by 
Miss Frances Hillman. Miss Wright's selections and the skill with 
which she rendered them delighted the audience. The "Song From 



The St. Mary's Muse 199 

'Sea Pieces/ " by MacDowell, Miss Hillman played especially well. 
The News and Observer says of the recital : 

Miss Martha Wright gave her certificate voice recital Thursday evening in 
St. Mary's auditorium. The program was delightfully performed throughout, 
and consisted of concert numbers and arias, old English and Italian songs, 
modern French and Italian, and concluding with a charming modern group. 
, The reception given Miss Wright was very warm, and a wave of applause 
swept the audience at the conclusion of the aria from "Mignon," "Je Suis Ti- 
tania," a part of which was repeated. 

Miss Wright's voice is a remarkably smooth soprano, and she sings with 

| much expressiveness as well as beautiful quality of tone. Her manner of 

singing has a delightful simplicity and sincerity, and she made last evening 

an exceedingly attractive girlish picture. Her diction and breath control 

were exceptionally good. 

Miss Wright is a pupil of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, Director of Voice and Organ 
at St. Mary's School. 

Assisting Miss Wright in her recital was Miss Frances Hillman, pianist, 
who played a group number charmingly with true musicianship and taste, 
i winning an encore and making her audience look with interest for further 
;l performances from her. 

The program in full was as follows : 

I. 

(a) Spring Carey 

| (&) Love's Isle Purcell 

(c) Bergere Legere Old French 

! (d ) Le Violette Scarlatti 

II. 

I Je Suis Titania" Scarlatti 

III. 

i Crescendo Per Lasson 

I Song from "Sea Pieces" MacDowell 

I March Wind MacDowell 

Miss Hillman 



i 



IV. 

I (a) Ritournelle Chaminade 

( 6 ) Mandoline Debussy 

(c) In Quelle Trine Morbide Puccini 

From "Manor Lescaut" 

V. 

(a) Love is a Bubble Allitsen 

(&) One Morning Very Early Sanderson 

(c) Lullaby Scott 

(d) Spring's Awakening ; Sanderson 



200 The St. Mary's Muse 



May 6— The "School Party" 

The annual ''School Party" has come to be regarded as one of the 
events of the year, and it was entered into this year no less heartily 
than in the past. 

The parlor was artistically decorated in the different class colors. 
Promptly at 8:15 the girls assembled in the schoolroom and marched 
into the parlor, led by the Juniors. All were dressed in white, with 
the addition of their class colors. The Juniors wore dainty little 
lavender aprons and bows on their hair. Dutch caps of gold and black 
pointed out the wise Sophomores, the Freshmen wore jaunty little 
caps of red and gray, while the Preps., as befitted their tender age, 
were dressed in short white dresses, socks, pink sashes, and saucy pink 
bows perched on their hair. After the classes had assembled there 
was a hush and the dignified Seniors filed slowly in, wearing caps 
and gowns and carrying diplomas tied with green ribbon. 

All standing, "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees" was sung, and 
then Mary Floyd, the Senior President, spoke briefly in explanation 
of the occasion. She said : 

This evening is the occasion of the Fifth School Party. Started five years 
ago by the Class of 1916 as Freshmen, it was given under the direction of 
that Class each year until its graduation, when it was handed over to the 
care of each succeeding Senior Class. It has been the pleasure of the Class 
of 1916 to arrange for it tonight, but — 

We want you all to remember that it is your School Party, and not that of 
the Senior Class. It is the party of the whole school, to be entered into by 
the whole school, from Faculty to Preps., and the heartiness of the coopera' 
tion will be the measure of its success. 

We have not tried for any novelties tonight. The School Party is intended 
to strengthen our school spirit, to make us all love St. Mary's just a little 
more dearly. And the program is based on the school songs, which are in- 
tended for the same purpose. 

We hope you will all enter into the program, and that we shall all enjoy 
the evening together. 

We will have first the greetings and the songs from the classes, beginning 
with the Juniors. We Seniors are glad to be here; we hope that the Faculty 
and the classes feel likewise. 

The program was then carried out as follows : 

1. Chorus: "Hail St. Mary's!" 

2. Class Greetings: 

(a) Introduction Mary Floyd, President 1916 

( b ) Junior Greeting Alice Latham 

Junior Song: "Funiculi, Funiculse." 



The St. Mary's Muse 201 

(c) Sophomore Greeting Katharine Drane 

Sophomore Song: "Come, Be a Learned Sophomore." 

(d) Freshman Greeting Josephine Myers 

Freshman Song: "Hear the Freshmen Coming in." 

(e) "Prep." Greeting Jacq Smith 

"Prep." Song: "We Are the Preplets, Sad to Say." 

(/) Senior Song: "Now We've Come to this Fairest Month of May." 
3. Glee Club Songs: 

(a) "Units." 

(b) "Senior Hall." 

(c) "Wonder Why the Seniors Are Looking so Forlorn." 

(This was the initial appearance of the Mandolin and Glee Club, 
which, under the direction of Josephine Wilson, '16, added much to 
the entertainment. The three songs were written by Annie Cam- 
eron, '16.) 
14. Toasts: 

(a) To the Rector Annie Cameron, '16 

(b) To the Faculty Katharine Bourne, '16 

(c) To the School Frances Geitner, '16 

(After the giving of these toasts, the class, under the lead of Jose- 
phine Wilson, united in singing the toast 

(d) To Miss Thomas, 

to which Miss Thomas very graciously responded.) 

5. Presentation of the Gift Mary Floyd, '16 

Acceptance The Rector 

6. Farewell Songs: 

(a) "Good-bye, 1916" Frances Tillotson and the Seniors 

(&) "Good-bye, School" : .Martha Wright and the Seniors 

(c) "Here's to the Seniors" Frances Tillotson and the Juniors 

7. "Alma Mater." 
J8. Refreshments. 

Of the gift, Mary Floyd said : 

Another of the customs inaugurated at the first party is the presentation 
>of a small gift by the girls to the school as a souvenir of the year and a 
reminder of their loyalty and love. The size of the gift is not to be taken as 
ta measure of their feelings, some day their means may be greater, but their 
(spirit will never be better. 

This year we take pleasure in presenting to the school an electric lantern 
of late model for use in illustrated lectures, and we trust that on the many 
occasions on which we hope it will be found of use that it will serve as a 
reminder of the girls of 1916, not only the Seniors of 1916, but all the girls 
of 1916. 



202 The St. Mart's Muse 

May 8 — Volleyball Game 

The last Junior volleyball game was played on Monday afternoon, 
May 8th, in the "gym." The line-up was' as follows : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Jensen (Captain). Burke (Captain). 

Lynah. Shepherd. 

Hoke. Arbogast, K. 

Royster. Barber, H. 

Frohne. Hill. 

Taylor. Lay, N. 
I ' i 
The Juniors are almost up to the first team in volleyball. The 

work of all was exceedingly quick and sure, and we must say that the 

work of the two captains can almost equal that of any girl of the first 

teams. 

May 8 — Diploma Recital. Mary Floyd 

On Monday evening, May 8th, Mary Floyd gave her Diploma 
Piano Recital, in the Auditorium. Those who heard Miss Floyd's 
Certificate Recital last year were looking forward to the evening with 
much interest and were by no means disappointed. Miss Floyd not 
only played with great feeling and expression, but showed a remark- 
able skill and mastery of technique. She was assisted by Miss Frances 
Tillotson, whose singing was, as usual, delightful. 

The New and Observer said of the recital: 

Miss Mary Floyd's diploma piano recital at St. Mary's last night was ren- 
dered with pianistic assurance and style and was much enjoyed by an enthusi- 
astic audience. 

The program opened with the Bach Prelude XXI and two charming Sgam- 
bati numbers, "Dolci Confidenze" and "Marche," followed by the brilliant 
Chopin Polonaise, op. 53. The rest of the program was wholly from modern 
composers. The Sonata, in A major, by Charles Wakefield Cadman, is a beau- 
tiful work and was evidently a favorite with the young pianist. The con- 
cluding group number, "Morning," by Templeton Strong, "Le Fee de la lot," 
by Mrs. Beach, and "Ballet," by DeBussy, were rendered with taste and spirit. 
Miss Floyd is an intellectual player with brilliant technique and perfectly at 
ease. 

She was assisted by Miss Frances Tillotson, soprano, who sang "Villanelle," 
by Del 'Acqua, and received a hearty encore, to which she graciously re- 
sponded. 

Both Miss Floyd and Miss Tillotson are pupils of Mr. R. Blinn Owen. 



The St. Mary's Muse 203 

May 11 — Certificate Recital by Miss Lois Pugh 

On Thursday, May 11th, a delightful evening was spent at the Cer- 
tificate Expression Recital given by Miss Lois Pugh, assisted by Miss 
Frances Tillotson. Miss Pugh well maintained the reputation she has 
won in her part in Dramatic Club plays, and Miss Tillotson was re- 
ceived with enthusiasm, as usual. Altogether the recital was one of 
the most enjoyable ones given this year. 

The News and Observer said of the recital: 

Miss Lois Pugh, certificate pupil in expression of Miss Florence C. Davis, 
gave a most enjoyable recital to an appreciative audience Thursday evening 
at St. Mary's. 

She showed genuine dramatic talent, filling well a variety of parts. 

In the scene from "The School for Scandal" she was an irascible but inter- 
i esting Sir Peter at one moment and the next his provoking but attractive 
lady. 

The monologue, "In a Restaurant," was given with spirit and liveliness. 

She was assisted by Miss Frances Tillotson, always a favorite with St. 
Mary's audiences. 

The program : 

I. 
A Victory Unforeseen Ralph D. Paine 

II. 

(a) Have You Seen But a Whyte Lillie Grow? Old English 

(&) Quel ruscelletto Pietro Domenico Parodies 

III. 
The Pink Pig 

IV. 

Scene from "The School for Scandal" Richard Sheridan 

V. 
Her Love Song Mary Turner Salter 

VI. 

When the Green Gits Back in the Trees >. 

Old-fashioned Roses ( Jame$ WMtcomb Riley 

I Ain't a-Goin' to Cry no More f 

Afterwhiles ) 

VII. 
In a Restaurant (monologue) Beatrice Herford 



204 The St. Mary's Muse 

May 12 — Alumnae Day 

Friday, May 12th, was, as usual, observed as Alumnse Day. It was 
the 74th anniversary of the opening of the school on May 12, 1842, by 
the late revered founder and first rector, the Rev. Dr. Aldert Smedes. 

The regular school exercises were suspended at 12 o'clock so that all 
might enter into the observance of the day. All the alumnse of Raleigh 
and many other friends of the school were invited. A large number of 
these joined with the Faculty and students, including the day stu- 
dents, in the exercises. These began with lunch at 1 :30 p. m. in the 
school diningroom. 

At the close of the lunch the Rector spoke a few cordial words of 
welcome in behalf of the School to the Alumnee and invited guests. 
Miss Mary Floyd, President of the Senior Class, followed with some 
well-chosen words of greeting on behalf of the student body. The reply 
to these greetings was made by Mrs. Elizabeth McC. Snow, Chairman 
of the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnse, who concluded her graceful 
speech by asking all the alumnse present to express their appreciation 
by a rising vote. 

After the lunch all adjourned to the School Parlor, where the stu- 
dents entertained the visitors with school songs. This was followed by 
the regular meeting of the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnse Association 
and many of the students availed themselves of the invitation to be 
present at the meeting. 

Miss Sally Dortch was elected chairman for the coming year in suc- 
cession to Mrs. Snow, and the other officers were reelected as follows : 
Miss Louise Busbee, Secretary ; Miss Lizzie H. Lee, Treasurer ; Mrs. 
A. M. Hanff and Mrs. LeRoy Thiem members of the council. 

The meeting closed with a few words from Miss Katie McKimmon 
in memory of two members, Mrs. John H. Winder and Mrs. A. B. 
Andrews, who had died since the last meeting. 

After the Alumnae meeting, at four o'clock, there were given on the 
lawn in front of Main Building, under the spreading oak trees, several 
of the beautiful dances which were enjoyed by so many at the recent 
Shakespeare Pageant. These were the "Bacca Pipes," the "Morris 
Jig," the solo dance "Helen," by Julia Bryan, and the "Shepherdess 
Dance." The Chorus Class also sang "Mowing the Barley." 



The St. Mary's Muse 205 

The dances were followed by a volleyball game in the "Gym.," 
which served as an interesting close to a very pleasant day. 

It is with great pleasure that those at St. Mary's welcomed back 
those of former days, and it was very pleasant and gratifying to see so 
many of the Alumnae present. It is hoped that even more will come 
next year to celebrate the 75th birthday of their Alma Mater. 

May 13 — The Chorus Concert 

On Saturday evening, May 13th, the annual Chorus Concert was 
given in the Auditorium. The productions of Mr. Owen's Chorus 
Class are always creditable, but the concert this year was especially 
enjoyed. Not only were the soloists delightful but the whole chorus 
was splendidly trained. The audience was a large one and was enthu- 
siastic over the really beautiful program. 

The News and Observer said of the concert : 

The annual concert of the chorus class and voice pupils of St. Mary's School 
was given before a large and genuinely impressed audience in St. Mary's audi- 
torium last evening. A program somewhat unusual in character and of real 
merit in the manner of its interpretation was presented. It was indeed an 
interesting and inspiring sight when the curtain rose upon the fifty young 
girls, chosen from the student-body of the school, seated in tiers upon the 
stage, while below sat the string orchestra, composed also of young musicians 
from Miss Abbott's class, reinforced by Dr. George Summey, Jr., cello, and 
Mr. W. S. Thomas, bass viol. 

A chorus like this must have careful training of a special sort, and this 
Mr. R. Blinn Owen, conductor, has provided with so much thoroughness and 
such insight and sympathy that the young band of singers under his direc- 
tion have reached a high plane of efficiency. 

It is a happy commentary on the results which have been achieved by the 
musical instruction that a chorus should participate so enthusiastically and 
understandingly in compositions of merit such as those offered last evening. 
The best tonal works with effects of light and shade was done in Woodman's 
setting of "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes" and in the concluding chorus 
of the cantata, "Garden of Flowers," which formed Part II of the program. 
Other numbers of the cantata which were specially pleasing and effective were 
"The Lark and the Nightingale" (duet), by Miss Tillotson and Miss Ander- 
son; "White Butterfly" (trio), by Miss Hughes, Miss Jerger, and Miss Thorn; 
"Lovely Rosebuds" (alto solo), by Miss Lois Pugh, and "The Bees," by Miss 
Martha Wright, soprano solo and chorus; "Oh! Happy Streamlet," by Miss 
Corbitt, and the "Good -night" (quartette), by Misses Wright, Bray, Thorn, 
and Anderson. 

The soloists assisting the chorus and adding much to the artistic success of 



206 The St. Mary's Muse 

the program were Miss Annie Lee Beck, Miss Martha Wright, Miss Frances 
Tillotson, Miss Dolores Holt, Miss Mildred Jerger, and Mr. James Bonner. 

Miss Martha Roberts contributed valuable aid and support with her excel- 
lent accompaniments, and the strings added much to the beauty of effect. 

The program was : 

PART I. 

I. (a) The First Smile of May C6sar Frank 

(&) Morning .Hawley 

Chorus 

II. Gia il sole dal Gange Scarlatti 

Miss A. Beck 

III. Qui est Homo, from "Stabat Mater" Rossini 

Misses Martha Wright and Frances Tillotson 

IV. Elegie Massenet 

Miss Dolores Holt 
Violin obbligato, Miss Mildred Jerger 

V. The King Fay Foster 

Miss Frances Tillotson 

VI. Era la notte, from "Otello" Verdi 

Mr. James Bonner 

VII. (a) Night in the Deserts Gertrude Ross 

(&) Dawn in the Desert r 

Miss Mildred Jerger 

VIII. Spring's Awakening Sanderson 

Miss Martha Wright 

IX. The Night Has a Thousand Eyes Woodman 

Chorus 

PART II. 
Cantata— "The Garden of Flowers" L. Denza 

Soloists 
Misses Elizabeth Corbitt 

Martha Wright 

Mildred Jerger 

Frances Tillotson 

Lucile Anderson 

Lois Pugh 

Rubie Thorn 

Violet Bray 

Aline Hughes 
First Violin — Miss Muriel Abbott, Miss Mildred Jerger 
Second Violin — Miss Frances Sears, Miss Helen Snyder 
Viola — Mr. Wilbur Royster 
'Cello — Dr. George Summey, Jr. 
Piano — Miss Martha Roberts 

Chorus 



•The St. Mary's Muse 20T 

May 15 — Diploma Recital by Helen Wright 

Everyone had looked forward to Helen Wright's Diploma Piano 
Recital, remembering her charming Certificate Recital in 1914, and 
they were not disappointed. Her mentality, technique, and musician- 
ship proved equal to the difficult and varied program, including num- 
bers from Brahms, Schumann, Chopin, Sinding, Schiitt, Glinka- 
Balikirew, and Hiller. She was at her best in the Schumann "Ro- 
mance," the Schiitt "Serenade," and "The Lark," by the Russian 
composer. The brilliant Miller Concerto in A minor was played with 
clean technique, faultless rhythm and much spirit. Helen is a pupil 
of Miss Dowd, having studied with her for the last five years. 

She was assisted by Mildred Jerger, violinist, pupil of Miss Abbott, 
who played the "Legende" of Wieniawski with beautiful tone and true 
musicianship, responding to an encore with "The Swan," by Saint- 
Saens. 

The program follows: 

I. 

Sonata, P minor Brahms 

Allegro Maestoso 

II. 

Romance, F sharp, major Schumann 

Romance, B major Schumann 

Fantaisie — Impromptu Chopin 

III. 
Legende Wieniawski 

IV. 

Fantaisie, No. I, Op. 118 Sinding 

Serenade from the "Carnaval" Schiitt 

The Lark Glinka-Balikirew 

V. 

Concerto, A minor Hiller 

Second Piano, Miss Dowd 



208 The St. Mary's Muse 

School Notes 

Emma Badham had a very short visit from her father on Thurs- 
day, May 11th. 

Miss Mary Jones, from Atlanta, the aunt of Mrs. Cruikshank, has 
been spending a few days at the School as Mrs. Cruikshank's guest. 

Mrs. Pugh was here for Lois's recital Thursday night, May 11th. 

Helen Laughinghouse had a very short visit on Saturday, May 11th, 
from her friend, Ernestine Forbes, who was on her way to her home in 
Greenville. 

On Saturday evening, May 13th, the Seniors had the pleasure of 
attending the annual reception given by Dr. and Mrs. Hill for the 
Seniors of A. and M. College to the Seniors of Meredith, Peace, and 
St. Mary's. 

Mr. Allen Jones, of San Francisco, and Miss Mary Pride Jones, of 
New York, the brother and sister of Mrs. Cruikshank, have recently 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank. 

Virginia Lassiter's father, mother, and sister Margaret, and Helen 
Mason's aunt were here April 9th, to be with them at their Confirma- 
tion on Passion Sunday. 

Miss Thomas was away a few days attending a meeting of the Fede- 
ration of College Women's Clubs, in Montgomery, Ala., where she 
went as a delegate from the Raleigh Branch. 

Mr. Charles Knox, long an important member of the faculty of St. 
Paul's School, 1ST. H., where Dr. Lay taught for many years, recently 
spent several days as a guest at the Rectory. 

On Sunday night, April 16th, a very interesting lecture was given 
in the Parlor by the Rev. A. B. Hunter, of St. Augustine's School. 
The subject was "Japan," and the lecture was illustrated by lantern 
slides. The evening proved enjoyable as well as very instructive. 

On Tuesday evening, April 18th, Miss Abbott and Miss' Roberts 
gave for the pupils and faculty of the School for the Blind a charming 



The St. Mary's Muse 209 

violin recital, with organ and piano accompaniment. The recital was 
held in the Auditorium of the School for the Blind and afforded a 
great deal of pleasure to all who were present. 

On the afternoon of Monday, April 24th, Mr. Cruikshank gave his 
table and a few other guests a delightful party in honor of Virginia 
Allen's birthday. The scene of festivities was the slope back of the 
Auditorium and the table was very prettily arranged. The chief fea- 
ture of the entertainment was the arrival of the beautiful white birth- 
day cake, decorated with little yellow candles and surrounded by a 
brood of tiny yellow chickens. Everyone had a lovely time and hoped 
that Virginia would have many happy returns of the day. 

Alice Hughes, Matilda Lamb, and Josephine Rose paid short visits 
to their sisters to attend the Shakespearian Festival. 

Ernestine Forbes, of Greenville, 1ST. C, has spent several days at 
the School, visiting Helen Laughinghouse. 

Margaret Gold, Margaret Marston, and Hattie Copeland have re- 
cently had visits from Eugenia Griffith, Corinne Barrack of Kinston, 
N. C, and Laura Gold, of Greensboro, ~N. C. 

Everyone enjoyed the visit on Easter from Pencie Warren, of 
Edenton, 1ST. C, a graduate of 1915. She was Business Manager of 
the Muse, and took a prominent part in school life. 

Miss Sully Heyward, a former teacher at St. Mary's, paid a short 
visit at Easter to Miss Urquhart in the School. 

Virginia Staten had a very pleasant visit from her mother and 
father, who were in town several days. 

Among those who were guests at the School to attend the May Fes- 
tival in Raleigh, were Louise Badham, of Edenton, 1ST. C, a former 
student at St. Mary's, and Maude Stewart, sister of Katherine Stew- 
art, of New Bern, K. C. 

I I 1*1-1 * 

An unusually large number from St. Mary's attended the Music 
Festival, which was held at the City Auditorium May 4th and 5th. 
More than a hundred and twenty-five teachers and girls in all attended 



210 The St. Mary's Muse 

the various concerts. St. Mary's' was also well represented in the 
chorus, as Miss Abbott, Miss Shull, Miss Seymour, Mr. Stone, and 
Miss Florence Stone were all members of it. 

All of her friends at St. Mary's were glad to see Jennie Woodruff 
on Saturday, May 6th. 

From May 6th to 8th "Miss Katie," Miss Dowd, and Miss Clara 
Fenner spent a very pleasant week-end in Chapel Hill, as the guests 
of Mrs. J. S. Holmes, who was Emily Smedes, of the Class of '84. 
Miss Fenner remained to see the Shakespearian Pageant, which was 
given at the University on Tuesday, April 9th. Miss Dowd had also 
been in Chapel Hill the week before, when she spent a week-end as the 
guest of Mrs. Archibald Henderson. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price .**.***** One Dollar. 

Single Copies * * * * ' Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
i n the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. G. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 
Mary A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 



Katharine Wimberly Bourne 
Fannie Marie Stallings 



>urne, '16 | Bu8ineaa Managers 



EDITORIAL 



Trje Shakespearian Tercentenary Festival 

One of the prettiest things ever held at St. Mary's was the Shake- 
spearian Tercentenary Festival which took place on the night of May 
1st. The audience was an unusually large one, and everybody agreed 
that the Festival was a wonderful success. And the one thing above 
all others that made it such a success was the interest and enthusiasm 
with which everybody in School entered into it and the honest whole- 
hearted work they did to make it go. 

Every department contributed something. The sight singing class 
learned the merry songs and jingles; the "gym." classes were "nimble 
with their heels," and acquired skill and grace in the many dances ; 
the studio furnished shields and posters ; the violin pupils prepared 
themselves to be the "fiddlers" (and very fine fiddlers they were, too) ; 
and everybody in general made costumes and joined in all prepara- 
tions for the great event. Miss Barton, Miss Abbott, Miss Shull, Miss 
Roberts, Miss Davis, and Mr. Owen are especially to be thanked, for it 
was their faithful work and their interest and enthusiasm that were 
largely responsible for the wonderful results. But in spite of all these 
forces to bring about success we feel that there could have been no 



212 The St. Mary's Muse 

festival at all without Miss Thomas herself, for she was the mainspring 
which set everything else in motion. It was she who made it possible 
to have the festival, and worked out the plan of events. Her interest 
never lagged ; her enthusiasm never wavered. She inspired others to 
work and was never too tired or too busy to help and advise. She was 
appealed to on all occasions, from the training of "Her Majestie's 
Players" to the question of how to puff sleeves and cut out jerkins, and 
never failed of advice and help when called upon. We feel that it is 
chiefly to her that we owe the great success of the festival and the 
pleasure we have had in taking part in it, and we quite agree with the 
words of the Wassail Song : 

"Here's a wassail to our Lady dear! 
She has no equal on this sphere, 
And he who will not drink her health 
We'll wish him neither wit nor wealth, 
Nor yet a rope to hang himself." 



The Session of 1916-1917 

From all appearances the session of 1916-1917 promises' to be a 
most interesting and successful one. The applications filed have 
already doubled the number reached at the same time last year, and 
many indications point to a full school. The year being also the 
School's seventy-fifth anniversary, Miss Katie's fiftieth anniversary, 
and Dr. Lay's tenth anniversary, the session will be marked by many 
interesting and unusual events. Many plans are already in progress 
and from all accounts Alumna? Day, 1917, promises to be a most de- 
lightful occasion. The class of 1916 intends to assemble "en masse," 
and it is hoped that many others will do the same. 



With the Rector 

From March 27th to April 6th Dr. Lay was in New York on bus- 
iness for the School, especialy in connection with plans for raising the 
proposed fund to pay the debt on the School and to provide for new 
buildings and equipment and an endowment. 



The St. Mary's Muse 213 

While in New York Dr. Lay had the pleasure of attending a meet- 
ing of the New York Chapter of the St. Mary's Alumnae. Twenty 
members were present and it was a very enjoyable occasion. The Rec- 
tor addressed the Chapter on the condition of the School and the 
present plans for its advancement, after which tea was served and 
there was opportunity for those present to meet each other in a social 
way. The meeting was held at the apartment of Mrs. Fanueil S. 
Weisse, the President of the New York Alumnae. It is of interest to 
note that Mrs. Weisse was a Sunday School scholar of the Rector many 

5' years ago at Calvary Church, New York. Dr. Lay while in New York 
also attended a dinner of the Alumni of St. Paul's School. 

The results of the Rector's trip were encouraging, but the success of 
the plans for the School will ultimately depend on what is first done 

i by the friends of the Church and of education in the Carolinas. 

From May 2d to 6th Dr. Lay attended the Church Congress at Nor- 

: folk. 

Dr. Lay also delivered the opening sermon at the Diocesan Conven- 
tion at Henderson on May 16th. Mrs. Lay accompanied him as a 

;i delegate from the St. Mary's Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary. Dr. 
and Mrs. Lay were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Corbitt during 
the Convention. 



The Year iQ Athletics 

It is a pleasure to be able to record the fact that the past year has 
been without question the best in atheletics and physical training that 
St. Mary's has enjoyed in recent years. To the enthusiastic director- 
ship of Miss Barton and the leadership of the association presidents 
and captains — Annie Robinson, President of Sigma ; Anne Brinley, 
President of Mu ; Nancy Woolford, Captain of Sigma, and Laura 
Beatty, Captain of Mu — the members of both Associations, including 
practically all the School, have responded with genuine interest and 
enthusiasm, and not only has much skill been shown in the various 
contests but the School spirit developed has been a distinct asset. 

The season continued from early in October through to the middle 
of May without interruption, and in each branch of athletics the 



214 The St. Mary's Muse 

various teams did good, effective work. The regular work of the 
"Gym." classes led up to the excellent "annual exhibit" in April; the 
"aesthetic dancing," in which Julia Bryan starred, had its first public 
presentation at this "exhibit" and was again effectively used in the 
Shakespearian Festival ; and the various dances of the Festival further 
attested the ability of Miss Barton and the skill and interest of the 
girls. But the "exhibit" and dancing were more or less a part of the 
regular School work, while the "athletics" were purely voluntary and 
in track events basketball, tennis, and volleyball more enthusiasm was 
displayed than ever before. 

There were two track meets during the session, the first on October 
25th, the second on April 10th. The Sigmas won the fall meet, 117 
points to 81 ; while the Mus were successful in the spring, 73 to 55. 
In the fall Mu won the hurl ball and obstacle race, while Sigma won 
the relay race; Askew, Mu, starred in the broad jump ; Brinley, Mu, 
and Waddell, Sigma, in the basketball throw, and Jensen, Sigma, won 
the dash. In the Spring, Mu won the high jump, broad jump, and 
relay race, while Sigma won the boundary ball contest; M. Wilson, 
Mu, won in jumping the bean bag; H. Barber and R. Hill, Mu, won 
the three-legged race, and A. Taylor, Sigma, won in goal throwing. 

More attention was given to basketball than to any other one branch 
and each association kept up four teams. The first teams met four 
times : November 1, December 6, March 8, and April 12, and Mu won 
all but the first contest and the year's championship. The scores were 
6-19, 20-18, 10-6, and 24-14, showing that the teams were, however, 
pretty evenly matched. 

The tennis tournament was played from November 8 to December 8, 
the finals being decided on the latter date. The Mus were victorious 
in all three of the final contests, Anne Brinley defeating Bertha Albert- 
son, 6-2, 6-0 ; Helen Brigham defeating Gladys Gentry, 6-0, 6-0 ; and 
Josephine Wilson winning over Annie Roberson, 6-4, 6-2. 

The volleyball season began in the Gymnasium on February 14th, 
and other games between the first teams were payed March 18 and 
May 12, Alumnss Day. The Mus won the first game, but the Sigmas 
triumphed in the other two. 



The St. Mary's Muse 215 

Appreciation 

We all appreciate the saying of nice things when the words have the 
right to ring, and St. Mary's has always had its share of such proper 
appreciation, but extracts from two letters which have recently been 
brought to our attention are repeated here so that more of those who 
love St. Mary's may enjoy them. 

Most of those at St. Mary's this year remember with much pleasure 
the Concert given by the Fuller Sisters in the Peace-St. Mary's con- 
cert series and the attractive and quaint charm of the Misses Fuller. 
The concert here was one of the series they were giving on their con- 
tinental tour and weeks after they left Raleigh their trip took them 
out to Minnesota, where at a luncheon Miss Breck, the chaperone of 
the Misses Fuller, chanced to meet the mother of a present-day St. 
Mary's girl, and this is what she said : "We all agreed, after touring 
i the South and singing at so many Southern schools, that we liked St. 
Mary's best, and thought them the sweetest, dearest lot of girls we 
i ever saw." 

And again a graduate of recent years, but not too recent to have had 
time to go on through a big college and win high honors there, in a 
private letter to her mother took occasion to say : "A nice St. Mary's 
Muse came to me this week. It makes me realize how little the School 
spirit has changed since I knew it. The School is a wonderfully fine 
one — better than any I know up North. I love it perhaps better be- 
cause I was younger there. At any rate, St. Mary's will always be a 
part of me — of my mental make-up, I mean." 



Baptisros in tf)e Chapel 

April 22d: Mary Pride Cruikshank. At a special service on 
Saturday afternoon, April 22d, the Rector baptised little Mary Pride 
Cruikshank, the five-weeks-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Cruikshank. Miss Mary Pride Jones, the baby's aunt, after whom 
she is named, and Mrs. Joe Davis acted as godmothers. 

April 20th : Deborah Victoria Hitchcock. At a special service 
after the 11 o'clock service on Sunday morning, April 30th, the Rec- 



216 The St. Mary's Muse 

tor baptized Deborah Victoria Hitchcock. This was the sixth baptism 
held in the Chapel during the present school year and the third from 
among the students. Miss Sutton, Miss Lee, and Mr. Stone were the 
sponsors. 



Confirmation Services in trje Crjapel 

On Passion Sunday, April 9th, Bishop Cheshire made his official 
visitation to the School. At the morning service Lola Paul and Helen 
Mason were baptized, and at the evening service the Rite of Confirma- 
tion was administered. The Confirmation Class consisted of Miss 
Shull, Jewel Register, Catherine Gilmer, Lucy Lay, Clara Paul, Lola 
Paul, Muriel Dougherty, Virginia Lassiter, Helen Mason, Mildred 
Jerger, and Frances Waters. 

The services were very beautiful and impressive. At the Baptismal 
Service there was used for the first time the beautiful brass ewer 
which was given by Miss McKimmon, Miss Dowd, and several other 
members of the Faculty, in memory of little Thomas Lay. 

The number of those who have been confirmed this year has been 
usually large. The Class Confirmed at the official visit of the Bishop 
on Passion Sunday consisted of eleven people, and on Wednesday 
night, May 10th, Bishop Cheshire made a special visitation to the 
Chapel in order to confirm seven more. This second Confirmation 
Class consisted of Misses Helen Urquhart, Virginia Bonner, Deborah 
Hitchcock, Eliza Knight, Fannie Stallings, May Tredwell, and 
Martha Wright. 






ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs - L MoK - Kttinger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - - - - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



fllumrjae News 

News' has just reached the School of the recent promotion of Miss 
Jessie Degen, '94, to be Associate Principal of Miss May's School, 
; 339 Marlboro Street, Boston, Mass. 

Of great interest to all at St. Mary's, as well as to her many friends 

I everywhere, is the announcement of the acceptance by Miss Emilie 

1 W. McVea, '84, of the Presidency of Sweetbrier College, Va. Miss 

; McVea has been for a number of years Dean of Women and Assistant 

Professor of English in the University of Cincinnati. 

Miss Julia Washington Allen, '14, of Goldsboro, is graduating this 

- June from Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, where she 

receives the B.A. degree. She has completed the course in two years, 

with credit to herself and to St. Mary's, and St. Mary's is proud of 

! her. 



flluiTjnae Marriages 

Brown-Yates. — On Saturday, April 29th, at Raleigh, Mr. Frances 

Burkhead Brown and Miss Mildred Johns Yates (1913-'15). At 

home, Atlanta, Ga. 
Cooper-Johns. — On Thursday, June 1st, at Raleigh, Mr. Everett 

Hanson Cooper and Miss Lucile Eccles Johns (1908-'10). 
Cheatham-Davis. — On Wednesday, June 14th, at Henderson, N". C, 

Miss Elvira Belle Davis (1909-'ll) and Mr. Joel Thomas 

Cheatham, both of Henderson. 



218 The St. Mary's Muse 

Music at St. Mary's 

As a part of the publicity program of the recent Raleigh Music 
Festival, which brought the Metropolitan Opera House Orchestra and 
five of the Metropolitan artists to Raleigh for a series of three concerts 
and was decidedly the most ambitious musical event that has yet been 
carried to success in Raleigh, there was issued a special section of the 
News and Observer on Sunday, April 30th, treating of the Festival 
and of the music interest of the city. 

One of the articles published in this connection dealt with "Music 
at St. Mary's" and with the idea that some of the historical informa- 
tion given in it may not be as familiar as it should be to the St. Mary's 
girls of the present we reproduce it here : 

From the foundation of the School in 1842, St. Mary's has stood for the 
highest ideals in musical education. One of the early musical directors was 
Professor Mendelssohn, a first cousin of Bartholdy Mendelssohn, and the first 
instructor of that great composer. He one day pointed to a picture of his 
famous cousin, which he valued very highly, and remarked with pride: 
"There is an instance where the pupil excels the teacher." Professor Men- 
delssohn was not only master of the piano and the violin, but was also pro- 
ficient with the flute, harp, and guitar. 

Among well-known musicians who have contributed to the development of 
this art at St. Mary's have been Dr. August Kuersteiner of Leipzig Conserva- 
tory, whose son, Paul Kuersteiner, is a well-known composer and teacher of 
the present day in New York; Sophus Wiig, a favorite pupil of the great 
Niels W. Gade, of Denmark; Albert Mack, of Stuttgart Conservatory, who 
went from St. Mary's to Syracuse University, where he died, and who is well 
known as a composer for piano and voice; Will H. Sanborn, of the Leipzig 
Conservatory, a pupil of Moas, Kellner, and Richter, especially known as an 
organist; and J. W. Jeudwine, of Bath, England. 

In connection with the work of Mr. Jeudwine, who was Director of Music 
at St. Mary's from 1900 to 1902, it is remembered that it was he who stand- 
ardized the course of music at St. Mary's and secured for it academic recog- 
nition, making it a definite part of the curriculum with academic credit in- 
stead of allowing it to be considered a "mere accomplishment." In this 
movement of such widespread interest in the State Music Teachers' Associa- 
tions of today, Mr. Jeudwine was distinctly a pioneer, and St. Mary's was one 
of the first schools to take this important stand. 

St. Mary's has tried for years to do her share in promoting musical inter- 
est in Raleigh, and many artists of high rank have appeared under her 
auspices, chief of whom stands out David Bispham. In 1906 the Eliza Battle 
Pittman Memorial Auditorium, with its excellent acoustic properties and 
seating arrangements, greatly increased the facilities for an artist's course, 



The St. Mary's Muse 219 

and in this building St. Mary's, in conjunction with her sister school, Peace 
Institute, has presented to the public during the past four years such artists 
as Madame Rider-Kelsey, Kathleen Parlow, Laura Coombs, the Zoellner Quar- 
tet, Paul Kefer, Hans Kronold, Jennie Dufay, and Frances Ingraham. 

The present Faculty are ably supporting the traditions of the Music De- 
partment of the School both in their teaching and in the musical activities 
of the State. Miss Martha A. Dowd, the present director, herself a daughter 
of St. Mary's, a pupil of the celebrated Kuersteiner, Wiig, and Mack, is 
widely known for her interest in all things musical. While on leave of 
absence she spent the season of 1915 in New York in pursuing her musical 
studies with one of the leading teachers, Edwin Farmer, of Carnegie Hall. 
She is the president of the North Carolina State Music Teachers' Association, 
of which organization she has been serving the past three years as secretary. 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen, the Director of Voice and Organ at St. Mary's is a 
Master of Music from the Detroit School of Music, is a versatile and well- 
known musician. He is a member of the American Guild of Organists, the 
founder and conductor of the St. Cecilia Club of Raleigh, one of the most 
finished musical organizations of the State, and is chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Standardization of Voice Teaching of the State Association. He has 
recently received the honor of appointment of the Chorus Conductor for 
Raleigh at the National Music Festival of America to be held at Black Moun- 
tain next August. Perhaps Mr. Owen is best known in the capacity of pro- 
fessional accompanist, in which he excels. 

Among other members of the Faculty might be mentioned Miss Muriel 
Abbott, vionlinist, a pupil of the famous Sevcik in Prague, who on numerous 
occasions has shown her rare musicianship; and Miss Louise Seymour, grad- 
uate of the New England Conservatory, the accompanist of the Raleigh 
Chorus in the present Festival. 

The serious interest of the students of today is music is shown by the size 
of the department, for of the 250 students of St. Mary's more than 150 in- 
clude Music in their subjects, and for the present session of 1916-16 there are 
graduates in Piano, Voice, and Organ, with advanced students in Violin. 

Within the past year two St. Mary's music graduates have appeared in 
Raleigh as professional artists — Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violinist, and Miss 
Josephine Gilmer, soprano. 

Among other honored musical daughters, St. Mary's also claims Mrs. Alice 
D. Grimes, the manager and moving spirit of the present Festival. 



(\ Message from trje New Yor^ fHurrjnae 

The New York Chapter holds two meetings, spring and fall, and 
is anxious to welcome any St. Mary's girl as member or guest. Send 
your address to the Secretary, Mrs. Charles Baskerville, 611 West 
110th Street, New York City, and she will let you know the time and 
place of meetings. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



The Eighteenth Volume of the 

ANNUAL MUSE 

will be ready May 22, 1916. 

$3 the copy. 
Subscriptions are invited. 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Go. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
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LADIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 



'You get them when promised" 



nortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



Fayetteville 
Street 



Wbt Jf asrtjton 



KAPLAN BROS. CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 



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THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 

HUNTER-RANI) COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Payetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk- Oyer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNA ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC EIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's 'will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining' place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N.C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 


W. B. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing- 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 





MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 


M. Rosenthal 


VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards& Broughton Printing 




Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 

Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 


B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 


Jolly & W/nnc Jewelry Cq. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 


WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



O. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



L. SCHWAETZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIYE'S RAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co. , Props., Kaleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cabdwell & O'Kellt, Pboprietoes 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va, 



Double Daily Express Service 

J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. C 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ & THE ART DEPARTMENT 

infection I h- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 
in these J 5# THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
1 6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1915-16 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 

Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 

slight to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH, N. C 




t jftlarp'g fflx&t 



aevaletstJ, fr c. 




Commencement ilnmfter 

3Fulp, 1916 



The next number of The Muse — the Vacation - Number — will 
be ready July loth. 

It "will contain among other interesting matter: 

(1) Authorized Announcements with Regard to the Campaign foe 
the $250,000 Fund. 

(2) Announcement of the New Teachers. 

(3) Much interesting Alumna News. 

If any of the subscribers to The Muse wish this Vacation Num- 
ber sent to a summer address, we shall be pleased to have them so 
notify us at once. 



THE COMMENCEMENT MUSE 

With this number The Muse says Good-bye to its friends for the 
summer, and the Editors and Business Managers turn over the maga- 
zine to their successors. 

The support of our friends has been much appreciated and we hope 
they have enjoyed their and our magazine. We trust that they will 
aid in increasing the subscription list of The Muse that it may con- 
stantly interest more and be of greater value. 

The next number will appear in September. A happy summer 
to you. May the next session of St, Mary's— her 75th session— be 
her best. 



(Tune: " Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charma.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



(1) Authorized Announcements with Eegard to the Campaign foe 
the $250,000 Fund. 

(2) Announcement of the New Teachers. 

(3) Much interesting Axttmioe News. 

If any of the subscribers to The Muse wish this Vacation Num- 
ber sent to a summer address, Ave shall be pleased to have them so 
notify us at once. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

Vol. XX July, 1916 No. 10 

Vouchsafe, we beseech Thee, Lord, to prosper with Thy blessing the work 
of this School, and all other works designed to promote Thy Glory and the 
good of souls. Grant that all who serve Thee here, whether as teachers 
or learners, may set Thy Holy will ever before them and do such things as are 
pleasing in Thy sight, that so both the Church and Commonwealth of this 
land may be bettered by their studies, and they themselves may finally be 
made partakers of everlasting life through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 

Alma Mater 



(Tune: " Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



222 The St. Mary's Muse 



THE 1916 COMMENCEMENT 



5:00 p. 


m. 


May 22, 11:00 a. 


m. 


3:00 p. 


m. 


4:30 p. 


m.. 


8:30 p. 


m. 


9:30 p. 


m. 



The Commencement Program 

Saturday, May 20, 8:15 p. m., Annual Recital of the Elocution Department 

in the Auditorium, "As You Like It." 
Sunday, May 21, 11:00 a. m., Commencement Sermon in the Chapel, by the 

Rev. Mercer P. Logan, D.D., Rector of St. 
Paul's Church, Charleston, S. C. 
m., Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 
Monday, May 22, 11:00 a. m., Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in 

the Studio. 
Annual Alumnae meeting in the Parlor. 
Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 
Tuesday, May 23, 11:00 a. m., Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Mr. James H. Dillard, 
D.C.L., LL.D. Closing Exercises in the 
Chapel. 

SATURDAY 
The Dramatic Club Play 

The Commencement festivities began, as usual, with the Dramatic 
Club play, "As You Like It," given in the Auditorium on Saturday 
evening, May 20th, before an unusually large audience. Aside from 
the fact that the Commencement play is one of the chief events of 
the year, it was, on this occasion, of especial interest, as it marked 
the completion of the third and last part of the Shakespearian Ter- 
centenary Celebration. A pleasant reminder of the Shakespearian 
Festival itself was the "Shepherdess Dance," which added greatly to 
the color and brightness of the last act. 

Of the excellent performance the News and Observer said: 

The St. Mary's Commencement season opened most auspiciously last night 
with the presentation, before an audience that filled the auditorium, of 
Shakespeare's always delightful romantic comedy of "As You Like It." 

The play was presented by the Elocution pupils of Miss Florence Davis, and 
bore most effective witness to her careful training. 

The players, although they make no pretensions of being professionals, 
made the play alive and interesting and recalled for the audience that Shakes- 
peare wrote for actors and playgoers, not for commentators. 



The St. Mary's Muse 223 

They also gave an admirable demonstration of the fact that Shakespeare's 
comedies do not need an elaborate stage setting, but depend mainly upon in- 
telligent and spirited acting. 

Where all did their parts well, it will not be thought invidious to select a 
few parts for special mention. The vivacious charm of Rosalind was well in- 
terpreted by Miss Lois Pugh. Miss Jane Norman made a dignified and at- 
tractive Orlando. The comic parts were ably interpreted by the jesting of 
Miss Dolores Holt as Touchstone, while Miss Annabelle Converse made a most 
natural country wench. 

A much appreciated feature of the evening's entertainment was the music 
furnished by a string orchestra led by Miss Muriel Abbott. 

The cast of characters was as follows : 

Duke, living in banishment Anne Brinley 

Frederick, his brother and usurper of his dominion, 

Katherine Stewart 

Lords attending on the banished Duke: 

Amiens Frances Tillotson 

Jaques Aline Hughes 

First Lord Velma Jutkins 

Second Lord Gertrude Merrimon 

LeBeau, a courtier attending upon Frederick Agnes Pratt 

Charles, wrestler to Frederick Carobell Stewart 

Sons of Sir Rowland de Boys: 

Oliver Alice Latham 

Jaques Josephine Frohne 

Orlando Jane Norman 

Adam, servant to Oliver Nancy Woolford 

Touchstone, a clown Dolores Holt 

Shepherds: 

Corin Rubie Thorn 

Silvius Helen Laughinghouse 

William, a country fellow, in love with Audrey. .Lucile Anderson 

Rosalind, daughter to the banished Duke Lois Pugh 

Celia, daughter to Frederick Elizabeth Corbitt 

Phebe, a shepherdess Julia Bryan 

Audrey, a country wench Annabelle Converse 

r Ethel Yates 

Attendants J .. „ ., 

1 May Tredwell 

Shepherdesses: 

Virginia Williams Emma Badham 

Eleanor Sublett Sarah Wood 

Eleanor Relyea Ellen Lay 

Virginia Allen Elizabeth Lay 

Frances Hillman Virginia Pottle 



224 The St. Mary's Muse 

SUNDAY 
Dr. Logan's Sermon 
The baccalaureate sermon was delivered this year by the Rev. 
Mercer P. Logan, D.D., Rector of St. Paul's Church, Charleston, S. C. 
The account of Dr. Logan's address, as it appeared in the News 
and Observer, was as follows: 

Placing God first, seizing the opportunities which will constantly open to 
them, carrying always an abundant cargo of hope and its counterpart, faith, 
cherishing the highest ideals, and to be not unmindful of the little deeds of 
mercy, kindness and good cheer to others, were the salient features of the 
message of Rev. Dr. Mercer P. Logan, of Charleston, S. C, in his sermon to 
the graduating class of St. Mary's School in the chapel of the institution yes- 
terday morning. 

Life is full of surprises, and the difficulties at times appear insurmount- 
able, he said, but as each surprise is met and overcome, the others that 
follow are more easily dealt with. The way that looks long, after it has 
been traveled, he said, seems short. He urged the young ladies to be pre- 
pared to seize the opportunities and surprises when they came. 

Takes Words of Joshua. 

His sermon was predicated on the words of Joshua, taken from the fourth 
verse of the third chapter of the book of the great leader of the Children of 
Israel: "Ye have not passed this way before." 

Upon assuming the leadership, Joshua's first consideration was the relation- 
ship with God, he said, realizing that nothing could be done in his ultimate 
plans without divine guidance. That this factor was absolutely essential for 
success in life, even for sustained material prosperity. Picturing the dark 
way and the difficulties that loomed before them, the great leader told them 
not to move one step until the ark went before them. With these words those 
appointed took the ark on their shoulders and went before the people. When 
they reached the Jordan the waters rolled back, the way seemed shorter 
than they thought, and the difficulties divided, and they passed on to the 
land of surprises, hopes and opportunities. 

The new way always appears longer than it really is, and the difficulties 
appear greater than they really are, he said. 

Telling his hearers that they were passing along a new way, he said that 
there were some things about the new way that were actually real. 

Life Full of Surprises. 
First, the new way is a way of surprises. Life at its best is full of sur- 
prises, he said, but these surprises are beneficial and they broaden the vision. 
That many would come that were never expected. That the future was hidden 
he considered a wise provision; that it would be a calamity to know too much. 
In this connection he cited the example of Christ, who held back things from 
the disciples in order that they might be surprised and profit thereby. He 






The St. Mary's Muse 225 

declared that there was a philosophy down at the bottom of these surprises, 
for when one receives one surprise he is better able to stand another. If all 
were known at the start, he said, the mind would be paralyzed and hope would 
vanish altogether. 

The second point was that it was a way of opportunities. That as one 
looked down the vista of life it was laden with opportunities. That today 
i there were opportunities at the door of all undreamed of by the past genera- 
i tion, made so by discoveries and invention. That opportunities for women 
were nigh at hand, if they were not already at hand, undreamed of not so 
many years ago. He urged the young ladies as they passed along this new 
way to take advantage of the opportunities and to use them. 

It is a Way of Hope. 
Another feature, he said, was that it was a way of hope. Those who have 
passed along the way could tell you many things, but you would not be- 
lieve them, he said. You want to try for yourself. There is such a thing as 

I curiosity of nature. This urges all to try for one's self, and he was of the 
opinion that it was well that this was so. That it was by this trying for one's 

; self that progress was made in the world. "Yes, the new way means hope; 
it is actually filled with hope, and oh! may your hopes be so bright as to actu- 
ally be wild in the creation of a gorgeous imagination; build air castles; hope 

: for the highest and best, for the highest ideals that can be born in any im- 
agination. I trust the day will never come when you will sit by the wayside 
without hope, in tears, and your soul filled with sorrow, inveighing against 
God and the world and the subtility of mankind." 

He pictured hope as the counterpart of faith, and said that faith was hope 
in operation. What could the world do without hope? he asked. 

Should be Pbepaked. 

There are also other things about the new way, he said. 

He said he believed in preparedness. That the preparation in school was 
not all. Preparedness must continue all through life. The man or woman 
who ceased to prepare, he said, would soon be left behind. 

Today, instead of the ark leading the way, it is Christ. Whereas the chil- 
dren of Israel dared not touch the ark, we can draw near and actually put 
our hands on Christ. Be conscious of your relations with God, he said. Be 
true to yourself; put your hands on the ark of God; be loyal to the church; 
ldo that which is right at all times and in all places. 

He then emphasized the little things in life. He said they may mean so 
imuch, may travel so far, may help others traveling the same way, and, after 
iall, the cost is so little. 

MONDAY 
The Class Day Exercises 

Monday morning the Juniors were up bright and early working 
on the daisy chain, as so many Junior classes have done before them, 
and at eleven o'clock promptly the Class Day procession appeared 



226 The St. Mart's Muse 

from behind West Rock. With the Marshals leading and all joining 
in singing "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees/' the classes marched 
to their several places, the only departure from former years being 
that the Seniors, with the daisy chain, brought up the rear, instead 
of coming, as heretofore, in a separate procession from East Rock. 
And the change was an improvement, making a better picture. 

Mary Floyd, the Class President, presided, with the other nine 
members of the class grouped about her on either side. Martha 
Wright was at the piano. The chief features of the Class Day were 
the court scene arranged by Jo Wilson, in which were incorporated 
the class poem by Frances Geitner, the class prophecy by Katharine 
Bourne, and the class knocks ; the appearance in the program of the 
sister class of 1912, headed by Miss Patsy Smith — the first case at 
St. Mary's of the participation of a graduate class in the Class Day 
exercises ; and the announcement of the dedication of the Annual 
Muse, an announcement always fraught with much interest to St. 
Mary's girls, the dedication this year being to Bishop Cheshire. 

The class exercises in full, being of special interest to the present 
day St. Mary's girls, are given at length further over in this Muse. 

The Alumnae Meeting 

The Alumna? meeting on Tuesday afternoon was well attended. 
The Alumna? met in the parlor at 4:30, and the meeting was called 
to order by the President, Mrs. Alice Grimes of Raleigh, after which 
prayer was offered by the Rector. 

The Treasurer's report was read, showing that as a result of 
special effort $895 has been added to the Iredell-Mclvimmon Fund 
during the year, and the present total of the fund is $4,375. In 
view of the decision of the trustees to inaugurate the all-important 
campaign for an endowment fund, it was decided to suspend efforts 
on the Alumna? Fund when the fund should amount to $4,500, to 
invest the uninvested portion to the best advantage and to pay the 
interest on the whole fund, as it has heretofore been paid on the 
$3,000 invested, to Mrs. Iredell and Miss McKimmon in equal parts. 

The Rector made a brief talk calling the attention of the Alumna? 
to the enrollment in the several years of his Rectorship, and invoking 
their earnest cooperation in all the work of the School. 



The St. Mary's Muse 227 



Officers were elected for the ensuing year as follows: President, 
: Mrs. W. E. Lindsay (Ella Tew, '79), of Glendale, S. C. ; Vice- 
President, Mrs. Ashby Baker (Minnie Tucker), of Raleigh; Secre- 
tary, Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's (reelected) ; Treasurer, Mrs. 
Ernest Cruikshank (Margaret Jones,. '96), St. Mary's (reelected); 
members of the Alumnae Council— to succeed Mrs. Charles Basker- 
ville, of New York City, and Mrs. David Elias, of Columbia, S. C. — 
Mrs. J. J. Bernard, of Raleigh, and Miss Florence W. Slater, '84, of 
New York City. Mrs. Bernard and Miss Slater, who will serve 

I until 1919, with the hold-over members, Miss Susan Iden, of Raleigh ; 
Mrs. Elizabeth Snow, of Raleigh; Miss Emilie W. McVea, '84, of 

I I Cincinnati, Ohio, and Miss Minnie Leary, '09, of Elizabeth City, 
i and the officers ex officio, will constitute the Alumna? Council for the 

next year. 

The Annual Report of the Alumnae Treasurer 
Receipts. 

Balance in Bank May 31, 1915 $ 479.20 

Dues to General Association 5.00 

'Chapter Dues Raleigh 46.00 

Asheville 11.50 

Wilson 2.00 

Hickory 3.00 

Scotland Neck 4.00 

Wilmington 51.00 

New York 8.00 

Charlotte 19.25 

Scholarship Fund : October Appeal 719.32 

Interest on Bonds 180.00 

Interest on Deposit 26.65 



Total $1,554.92 

Expenditures. 

Interest on Bonds, paid to beneficiaries $ 180.00 

For expenses of Treasurer 1.00 

Balance in Bank this date, May 20 1,373.92 



$1,554.92 
McKimmon-Iredeul Fund. 

Added during 1915-16 $ 894.72 

Total resources 4,373.92 

deeded to complete the Fund 1,626.08 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. Cruikshank. 



228 The St. Mary's Muse 

The Art Exhibit 

In spite of the fact that there were, this year, no certificate pupils, 
the art exhibit showed as usual the skillful and diligent work of the 
art pupils and the splendid training of Miss Fenner. There was an 
unusually large display of water-color paintings, among which Helen 
Bennett seemed to have an unusually large share. The pen and 
ink work of Deborah Hitchcock and Elizabeth Lay added greatly to 
the exhibit, and among the pencil work the sketches of Nancy Lay 
deserve especial mention. The one oil pupil was Annie Cameron, 
and the one figure, a splendid copy of the Venus de Milo, was done 
by Elizabeth Lay. A unique and interesting feature of the art 
exhibit were the drawings and stenciling done by the Preparatory 
Department, who have a half-hour of drawing a week, and the cur- 
tains stenciled with an original design by Nettie Daniels were greatly 
admired. As usual, the studio was beautifully decorated with vines 
and boughs, and with its walls covered with well-done work, it pre- 
sented a very pleasant and attractive sight. 

The Annual Concert 

The annual concert was given in the auditorium on Monday even- 
ing, May 22d, and was an unusually brilliant affair. The building 
was crowded by a very large audience and the evening was thoroughly 
enjoyed. 

The News and Observer gave the following account of the concert : 

The concert last evening was an unusually brilliant one, a fitting crown to 
a year of successful work in the Music Department. Piano, Voice, and Violin 
were all represented. The program was a varied one and so arranged that 
there was no monotony, each number being received with fresh interest by 
an enthusiastic audience. 

Miss Katharine Drane opened the concert with a "Novelette" by Schumann, 
which she played with firm technique and good full tone. This was followed 
by an (a) and (b) number, sung by Miss Annie Lee Beck, lyric soprano rich 
in quality, capable also of dramatic effects, as shown in her rendering of "The 
Realm of Love" by Ronald. "The Blackbird," by Weatherly, was a dainty 
fantasy particularly pleasing and bringing out Miss Beck's sweetest tones. 
"La Fee de la Fountaine," by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach, was played by Miss Mary 
Floyd in graceful, clear, crystalline style. The violin trio, "Ballata," was 
played by Misses Mildred Jerger, Frances Sears, and Helen Snyder with ex- 
cellent ensemble, good phrasing and tone. 



The St. Mary's Muse 229 

Miss Martha Wright, coloratura soprano, sang "Je suis Titania" with much 
spirit, revealing a voice pure, flexible and brilliant. 

Miss Prances Hillman gave a musicianly interpretation of two beautiful 
MacDonald selections. 

Part two of the program began with the "Legende" of Wieniawski given by 
Miss Mildred Jerger, a young violinist of promising ability. 

The Program 

PART ONE. 

I 

Novelette Schumann 

Miss Katharine Drane 

II 

(a) The Realm of Love Ronald 

(b) The Blackbird Weatherly 

Miss Annie Lee Beck 

III 

La Fee de la Fontaine Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

Miss Mary Floyd 

IV 

Ballata Papini 

Trio for three violins and piano, Misses Mildred Jergeb, 
Frances Sears, and Helen Snyder 

Miss Helen Wright at the piano 

V 

" Je Suis Titania" Thomas 

Polonaise from "Mignon" 

Miss Martha Wright 

VI 

(a) Song from "Sea Pieces" MacDowell 

(&) March Wind MacDowell 

Miss Frances Hillman 

PART TWO. 

I 

Legende Wieniawski 

Miss Mildred Jerger 
Miss Seymour at the piano 

II 

(a) Serenade Schiitt 

( &) The Lark Glinka-Balikirew 

Miss Helen Wright 



230 The St. Mary's Muse 

ill 

"L'Estasi," Waltz Song Arditi 

Miss Frances Tillotson 

IV 

Tarantelle in G flat Moszkowski 

Miss Martha Weight 

V 

"Good-night" — Quartette Denza 

Misses Maktha Weight, Violet Bbay, Rltbie Thorn, and 

Ltjcile Anderson, with string accompaniment 
First Violin — Miss Muriel Abbott, Miss Mildred Jerger 
Second Violin — Miss Frances Sears, Miss Helen Snyder 
'Cello — Dr. George Summey, Jr. 
Bass — Mr, W. S. Thomas 
Piano — Miss Martha Roberts 

The Rector's Reception 

Immediately after the annual concert, the Rector's reception was 
held in the parlor. The large number of guests were received by 
Dr. and Mrs. Lay, Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, "Miss Katie" and the 
ten graduates. It was a very pleasant gathering of commencement 
visitors, friends and relatives of the graduates, old St. Mary's girls, 
and other friends of the school. The evening was a delightful one 
and was thoroughly enjoyed by all who were present. 

TUESDAY 
The Commencement Day Exercises 

The News and Observer said: 

A few minutes after Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, in a few words, had 
delivered the final message to the graduates and bade them a fond farewell, 
the 1915-1916 session of St. Mary's School was brought to a close, follow- 
ing the last of the Commencement program, which included a strong ad- 
dress to the graduates by Dr. James H. Dillard, of Charlottesville, Va., and 
the presentation of diplomas and certificates to the graduates. Although 
disagreeable weather prevailed, the auditorium was filled with friends of the 
school. 

The exercises in the auditorium opened with a selection, "The Morn," by a 
semichorus composed of Misses Tillotson, Corbitt, Pugh, Hughes, D. Holt, 
V. Jones, Martha Wright, Helen Wright, Violet Bray, Hillman, Anderson, and 
E. B. Lay. Miss Mary Auning Floyd, of St. Stephens, S. C, then delivered 
the class salutatory. Miss Katherine Wimberly Bourne, of Tarboro, read the 
class essay, the subject being "Our Mountains." Miss Julia Bryan then gave 
a delightful piano solo, and the address by Dr. Dillard followed. 



The St. Maey's Muse 231 

The speaker was introduced by Rector George W. Lay, who spoke of him 
as a man who, although born in Virginia, loved dear old North Carolina and 
always had a warm spot in his heart for the Tar Heel State. 

"Reading" was the subject Dr. Dillard selected to talk about to the young 
ladies, who received their diplomas only a short time after the address; but 
before launching upon his subject he paid a beautiful tribute to North Caro- 
lina and the people who have united to make the State what it is today. 
"North Carolina," he said, "is one of the most forward of all our Southern 
States and a leader showing the others the way. I know of no other towns 
showing such civic pride and public spirit as those in North Carolina." 

In presenting thoughts to the young ladies on the verge of returning to 
their homes after years of hard study and constant work over books, Dr. Dil- 
lard made a forceful address in which he advocated not only to the young 
ladies, but to all, pure, wholesome reading as the keynote of education and 
an essential to the best type of life. 

"Reading is the keynote to education," he began, "and, above every other 
thing, it is a compliment to one who is able to read in a manner that is 
enjoyable. It is a pity that the teachers now do not lay as much stress upon 
reading as in years past. In school now the subjects are more varied, new 
ones being introduced year after year, and reading has decreased far more 
than teachers should have permitted." 

He then stated that he would answer three important questions about read- 
ing: why, how, and what to read. 

One of the reasons why one should read, he stated, is curiosity. "We ought 
to have curiosity about reading, and we ought to read newspapers, not for the 
mere sake of reading a paper, but for certain things in view. How many are 
there of you who read the editorials of a newspaper and then compare the 
thought of the editorial with your thoughts? Another reason why we should 
read is amusement." 

Dr. Dillard classed novel reading as a form of reading for amusement. In 
talking about novels he warned his hearers not to read novels that are not 
over one year old. "It is almost impossible for the best seller to be a great 
book," he said. 

Reading as a tonic was still another reason he gave why one should read. 
"When one is tired mentally and run down intellectually, good, wholesome 
books are needed." 

In explaining how one ought to read, he emphasized the necessity for read- 
ing intelligently. "I have known persons who have graduated and they could 
not read the English language. We must have some cue to follow in reading 
intelligently. I mean that we should be able to think back of the words and 
read with a sense of remembrance. We should read with insight and then 
try to think about what the author is talking about. 

"In order to have insight there must be a living with the subject just as 
when we first see a picture, and finally only realize its art the longer we look 
at it. Do you get tired of looking at a great picture or a pretty house? No. 
Then you must have an acquaintance of what you are reading before you can 
grasp the subject and fully understand it." 



232 The St. Mary's Muse 

In mentioning different books one should read, Dr. Dillard gave two books 
in the Bible — Job and Psalms. Others he said should be read are Homer, the 
.^Eneid, Shakespeare, Wordsworth's, Sidney Lanier's, and Browning's poems. 

The address was followed by a piano solo by Miss Sarah Littlejohn Rawl- 
ings, after which Miss Annie Sutton Cameron, of Hillsboro, gave the class 
valedictory. 

Rector George W. Lay concluded the exercises in the auditorium by an- 
nouncing the honors and presenting the certificates and distinctions. 

Following the presentation of the certificates the remainder of the exer- 
cises took place in the chapel, where Bishop Cheshire made his address to 
the graduates and also presented the diplomas. 

The members of the graduating class were: Katharine Wimberly Bourne, 
Tarboro; Annie Sutton Cameron, Hillsboro; Mary Auning Floyd, St. Stephens, 
S. C; Frances Royer Geitner, Hickory; Selena Emma Galbraith, Waverly 
Mills, S. C. ; Rena Brickell Hoyt Harding, Washington ; Susan Elizabeth Lamb, 
Henderson; Fannie Marie Stallings, Suffolk; Josephine Savilla Wilson, San 
Luis Potosi, Mexico; Helen Cherry Wright, Boardman. 



The St. Mary's Muse 233 



THE 1916 COMMENCEMENT AWARDS 



HONORS IN THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT 

For Attendance: 

Phyllis Halstead 
(Who has been present at all recitations during the Session 1915-16.) 

For Deportment : 

Mary Elisabeth Yates. 
Elizabeth Lee. 

For Having Passed All Examinations: 
Isabel Hay Jones. 
Elizabeth Crow Mahler. 
Eugenia Riddick. 
Susie May Robbins. 

To be Specially Commended for Good Work: 
(The members of Class A, who were in February promoted to Class B.) 
Rebecca Bowen. 
Elizabeth Crow Mahler. 
Eugenia Riddick. 
Susie May Robbins. 

Roll of Honor 

Sylbert Pendleton 95.6 

Virginia Harrison Lay 94.7 

Dorothy Howard 90.7 

HONORS IN THE LOWER PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

Roll of Honor 

(Arranged in order of standing.) 

1. Mary Wilson. 

2. Elizabeth Baker. 

3. Margaret Raney. 

4. Elizabeth Woollcott. 

5. Mary Strange Morgan. 

6. Adelaide Boylston. 

7. Sallie Cameron. 

8. Josephine Ellington. 



234 The St. Mary's Muse 



CLASS PROMOTIONS (IN THE COLLEGE) FOR THE SESSION OF 1916-'17 

To be Seniors. 
Virginia Caroline Allen. 
Emma Hudgins Badham. 
Prances Howe Cheatham. 
Jeanet Fairley. 
Elmyra Jenkins. 
Golda Judd. 
Alice Cohn Latham. 
Eva Irene Peele. 
Eleanor Relyea. 
Annie Huske Robinson. 
Nellie Cooper Rose. 

To be Juniors. 
Sarah Elizabeth Borden. 
Violet Marie Bray. 
Elizabeth Mae Corbitt. 
Katharine Parker Drane. 
Elizabeth McMorine Polk. 
Caroline White Holmes. 
Katharine Dorothy Hughes. 
Henrietta Marshall Morgan. 
Leah Marion Smith. 
Rubie Logan Thorn. 

To be Sophomores. 
Bertha Sears Albertson. 
Edith Kinsley Blodgett. 
Julia Bryan. 
Nina Hine Burke. 
Florence Cooper Busbee. 
Mildred Collins. 
Flora Virginia Denham. 
Georgia Foster. 
Josephine Hannah Frohne. 
Ruth Ward Gebert. 
Deborah Victoria Hitchcock. 
Dolores Stevens Holt. 
Aline Edmonds Hughes. 
Loula Grogan Jones. 
Helen Laughinghouse. 
Ellen Booth Lay. 
Marie Dorothea Linehan. 
Helen Carhart Mason. 



The St. Maey's Muse 235 

Novella Higgs Moye. 
Mary Mullins. 
Josephine Macon Myers. 
Jane Howard Norman. 
Agnes Theresa Pratt. 
Sarah Littlejohn Rawlings. 
Frances Harriet Waters. 
Helen Weakley. 
Sarah Louise Wood. 
Ethel Caroline Yates. 
Minnie Exum Sugg. 

To be Conditioned Freshmen. 
Mary McBee Hoke. 
Anna Rogers Lay. 
Minerva Virginia Pottle. 
Lillias McDonald Shepherd. 
Virginia Page Royster. 

THE HONOR ROLL OF 1915-'16 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire 
session and have been absent from no duty at any time 
during the session without the full consent of the Rector, 
and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular 
course of study, cr its equivalent, and must have carried this 
work to successful completion, taking all required examina- 
tions and obtaining a mark for the year in each subject of 
at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" 
(90 per cent) or better in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less 
than two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in 
Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

THE HONOR ROLL OF 1915'16 

1. Annie Sutton Cameron, '16 95.6 

2. Katherine Crichton Alston, Prep 94.2 

3. Elizabeth McMorine Folk, '18 93.5 

4. Deborah Victoria Hitchcock, '19 '. 93.2 

5. Katherine Wimberly Bourne, '16 93.0 

6. Katharine Parker Drane, '18 92.7 



236 The St. Maky's Muse 

7. Rena Hoyt Harding, '16 92.5 

8. Mary Auning Floyd, '16 92.4 

9. Josephine Savilla Wilson, '16 92.4 

10. Eva Irene Peel, '17 91.6 

11. Henrietta Marshall Morgan, '18 91.4 

12. Aline Edmonds Hughes, '19 91.3 

13. Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 91.2 

14. Eleanor Relyea, '17 90.8 

15. Agnes Theresa Pratt, '19 90.1 

THE NILES MEDAL 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was instituted by 
the Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D.D., in 1906. It is awarded 
to the student who has made the best record in scholarship 
and deportment during the session. The medal is awarded 
to the same student only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at 
least 15 points of regular work; and have satisfactorily com- 
pleted this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular general courses as- 
signed and have done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Depart- 
ment. 

The Niles Medal for 1916. 

In accordance with these conditions, the eleventh award 
of the Niles Medal is made this year to 

Annie Sutton Cameron, of Hillsboro, 
of the graduating class, whose average for the year is 95.6, 
and whose record in Deportment, Punctuality, and Industry 
for the four years has been practically perfect. 

Certificates in the Business Department. 

Certificate in Bookkeeping. 

Nancy Polk Woolford Suffolk, Ya. 

Certificate in Bookkeeping and Typewriting. 
Roberta McElhannon Washington, D. C. 

Certificates in Stenography and Typewriting. 

Virginia Lucile Bonner Raleigh, N. C. 

Katherine Lassiter Crews Raleigh, N. C. 

Sarah Edna Edwards Raleigh, N. C. 

Edna Matilda Mann Middletown, N. C. 

Margaret Emma Mann Middletown, N. C. 

Gladys Williamson Raleigh, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 237 

Full Certificate. 

(Stenography, Typewriting, and Bookkeeping.) 

Mattie Sinclair Rockingham, N. C. 

Certificate in the Elocution Department. 
Lois Pugh Savannah, Ga. 

Awards in the Music Department. 
Teacher's Certificate in Piano. 

Violet Marie Bray Tryon, N. C. 

Certificate in Organ. 
Helen Cherry Wright Boardman, N. C. 

Certificate in Piano 
and 

Certificate in Voice. 
Martha Boardman Wright Boardman, N. C. 

Diplomas in Piano. 

Mary Auning Floyd St. Stephens, S. C. 

Helen Cherry Wright Boardman, N. C. 

THE GRADUATES 

The College Class of 1916. 

Katherine Wimberly Bourne Tarboro, N. C. 

Annie Sutton Cameron Hillsboro, N. C. 

Mary Auning Floyd St. Stephens, S. C. 

Frances Royer Geitner Hickory, N. C. 

Selena Emma Galbraith Waverly Mills, S. C. 

Rena Brickell Hoyt Harding Washington, N. C. 

Susan Elizabeth Lamb Henderson, N. C. 

Fannie Marie Stallings Suffolk, Va. 

Josephine Savilla Wilson San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

Helen Cherry Wright Boardman, N. C. 



238 The St. Mart's Muse 



THE COLLEGE HONORS OF 1916 



The Salutatory 

Mary Auning Floyd. 

Some events owe their very reason for being to participation in 
them by those who are genuinely interested, by those who are bound 
to the main performers by ties of cooperation towards the same ends 
and affection for the same idea, and so we are glad to have here with 
us at our graduation those with whom we have been working and 
playing for our four years. It is a pleasant privilege to welcome 
here today our Rector, whom we are glad to have known and to have 
been with ; the Trustees, our Faculty and students, and the visitors, 
particularly the "old girls" whom we have enjoyed being with again. 
We cannot fail to feel the absence of our Lady Principal, the coun- 
sellor and friend of each St. Mary's girl, our dear Miss Thomas. 
The Class of 1916 welcomes you all. 

The Class Essay: Our Mountains 

Katherine Wimberly Bourne. 

A crisp fresh breeze sweeps up the valley and shakes the glistening 
dew from the bright green leaves ; the songster of the South thrills 
from an armored pine hard by ; the air is fragrant with balsam and 
arbutus ; a rich glow of light streaks the sky and touches into gold the 
topmost boughs of the trees. It is sunrise in our mountains. 

As the sun rises higher, the golden clouds break apart, the shadows 
and mists of the night disappear, and a vast sea of mountains lies 
spread out before us. The glory, the wonder of the mountains ! 
Have you not visited them ? Have you not stood in a valley and 
seen the towering peaks rise around you, mountain behind mountain 
until it verily seems a world of mountains ; or climbed to the top of 
one and felt the glory, the spirit of the mountains % The picture 
fascinates and appeals to the imagination, but until you have climbed 
them, walked and lived in them, do you understand the spirit, and 
receive the gift that our mountains have for every one who will 
journey to those highlands ? 



The St. Mary's Muse 239 

Our mountains ! Look at the towering wooded mountains of our 
old North State, and you will see among others three great ranges, 
the Black Mountains, the Sapphire Mountains, and the Smoky Moun- 
tains, which stand for three steep mountains of our life. Each has 
its own characteristics, each its own charm. 

The Black Mountains, great, majestic, and inspiring, standing with 
their rugged formidable peaks, bald and grand — must we climb them ? 
Their rocks cut our feet, their tangled briars and undergrowth impede 
our progress, and their heights in the distance seem unachievable as 
we go wearily up. Why these sharp rocks and tangled brambles — 
the cruel cutting words, the little hidden unpleasantnesses of our 
daily life ? We gain from them patience and endurance, strength 
and love; so when we finally reach the top, we are rewarded with a 
wide far-seeing view of life, and we have an understanding sympathy 
for our struggling companions still on the climb. We learn a secret 
from these mountains which prepares us for our others. 

Our Sapphire Mountains — no other name could so rightly express 
these beautiful heights, with their lakes and their sparkling gems. 
Here, indeed, we find treasures, for these are pleasant places, and 
because of their very pleasantness, because of their very charm, they 
are a necessary part of our lives. There are gems of many varied 
colors, rare and beautiful, and, finding one, we guard it with our life. 
So we learn to treasure the rare, the beautiful thing which makes life 
not only worth living, but sweet to live, so that we too may say, 
"How good is Man's life, the mere living." 

And, lastly, the Smoky Mountains, the wild, ghost-like summits of 
mystery which rise against the western sky. They have a subtle, 
charming personality. They have dream-like slopes broken by rush- 
ing streams over dangerous cliffs, deep ravines, all sweet with fresh- 
ness and with fragrance. These mountains fascinate and interest 
live men, men with plans and dreams, men with life and energy. 
In one of these misty dreamy valleys "you can dream, and not make 
dreams your master," for "up the pinnacle glory reaches, and the 
pride of your soul is in sight." These wild, towering, challenging 
peaks, with the strong, fresh, life-giving breeze, make the man rise 



240 The St. Maky's Muse 

above the dreamer, and he goes with all his might to attain unto and 
to receive the gift of his mountains. 

These mountains, the mountains in every man's life, of obstacles, 
of rare jewels, and of mysterious dreams and achievements — what do 
they give men \ They appear as obstacles to impede progress, but 
they are pathways to points of unobstructed vision. Little may we 
realize this when climbing, when one difficult peak after another rises 
above and beyond, and the goal is still in the far, far distance. Then, 
as the sun grows hotter and the breeze lags, can we but summon 
courage to go on, not resting too long when weary, for then the mus- 
cles grow stiff, and the will weak, but ever advancing to the top, then 
will we see the glory, there will we catch the vision, and can return to 
the level earth, to the common crowd, but with a remembrance of a 
gleam so intense, a vision so real, that our thoughts, our influence, 
and our lives will be transmuted into a wondrous virtue that stimu- 
lates others to the heights where we were led. 

What is this vision, what change is wrought by it, and who catches 
it ? The scholars of the world, the artists of the ages and the leaders 
of all time, were but men as you and I who have toiled up the moun- 
tains of experience, through the valleys on to clear light of the hill- 
top, and their great works which they have left as beacons for us are 
the products of a dream, the completion of an ideal, and the realiza- 
tion of a vision. 

Then there is the crowd, the common people, whose lives are mostly 
made up of seemingly trivial things, of the daily round of common 
tasks, who can never lead men. Yet our mountains are free to all 
who will make the pilgrimage, our great towering, rain-washed, wind- 
swept, but sun-bathed mountains. There humanity learns to "Look 
up, not down." There the band of laborers with the greater men 
see the vision, and work for greater purposes. "Their aim is per- 
fection, their ideal God." They have dreamed in the valley of the 
mountains and awakened to go to the top, for the foothills are on the 
earth, but the peaks are in the very heavens themselves. 

This glory and wonder changes with the changing seasons, and 
with each change we see the vision in a different light, and understand 
and love our mountains the better. The spring comes slowly. You 



The St. Mary's Muse 241 

feel it in the air, then you find your first arbutus, which is followed 
by iris and purple violets. Suddenly the peach blossoms burst forth, 
and the trees become alive with singing birds, and summer is here 
with "a sea of bloom and sweet perfume." But before long the pink 
and white blossoms of azalea, rhododendron and mountain laurel give 
place to the vivid red, brown, and gold of the autumn trees. Even 
winter has her charm. The snow piles high, and through the clear, 
cold air, the mountains themselves stand more rugged, more real and 
more grand. So in our lives the change brings wonderful things. 
The arbutus of spring whispers sweet secrets of promise, and we long 
to climb straight up the steep sides, unheeding the advice of the wise 
who say, "Follow the path around the bend, and you will find a better 
place to make the steep ascent." In summer comes all the sweetness 
of entering the battle in full array. There is a joy, an overflowing 
energy which scoffs at briars and sees only the blooms. Then in the 
fall cames a steady, more substantial fight, for the blooms have fallen 
and we find what is underneath. Through the pure cold air of 
winter we get a clearer, grander picture of our mountains, and realize 
the true value which lies in overcoming the greatest obstacles. 

So we find that the wealth of our mountains is not in the grand 
age-old trees, nor the minerals in their earth, but in the strong health- 
giving air, in the beauty of the flowers and the birds, but most of all 
in the great hope and inspiration that they give. Out of this solitude 
have come revelations. 

Once more let us ascend to their height. The sun is sinking. 
His last glorious rays spread a halo around. We have climbed to the 
top, and seen the glory of great things. It has inspired us, strength- 
ened us, spurred us on. We, wish to make others strive, seek and 
find the great ideal. But wait : the gift of the mountains is not com- 
plete. Look closely ; there it is at your feet, or you passed it on your 
ascent — a tiny, delicate ghost flower, or a dainty, fragrant arbutus. 
Pick it gently, and examine it closely. There you have it, the secret 
of the great inspiring eternal mountains. Go on, go up, wherever the 
vision may lead you ; but always remember, there is a sweetness in 
little things, a beauty and a joy that should go with you. Then echo 
the cry for ever and ever that the prophets of old sounded, "I will 
lift up mine eyes unto the hills from whence cometh my strength." 



242 The St. Mary's Muse 

The Valedictory 

Annie Sutton Cameron. 

At last the day has come to which for four years we have looked 
forward, half with longing, half with dread — with eagerness at first, 
but with an ever-growing reluctance, until, as we stand here today, 
we feel deep down in our hearts that we would give anything, any- 
thing we possess, to turn back again, to be the least little Prep in 
school, and have the chance to live over once more those happy, golden 
years. But, full of sorrow and grief, as we are, over the coming part- 
ings, yet our hearts are filled with joy and thankfulness for the great 
gift that has been given to us, the wonderful heritage that we have 
received, for we feel that as we go forth, the love and the ideals of 
St. Mary's we shall carry with us in our hearts. So, as we sorrow- 
fully bid farewell to our kind Rector, our beloved Lady Principal, 
and all our dear teachers and schoolmates, it is with a greater realiza- 
tion of what St. Mary's has meant to us and with a deeper love and 
reverence that we pray, may God bless St. Mary's, and that we say 
to each of you, good-bye, and may it be our lot in the coming years 
often to meet again. 



The St. Mary's Muse 243 



THE CLASS DAY EXERCISES 



Of course, Class Day is the nicest, dearest day of all Commence- 
ment, very close to the hearts of every one in School and especially to 
the Seniors, whose special day it is. In spite of the clouds, prepara- 
tions went forward as usual and eleven o'clock of Monday saw a large 
company of visitors assembled in the grove and the long white line of 
underclassmen winding around West Rock singing "In a Grove of 
Stately Oak Trees," and followed by the ten Seniors bearing the Daisy 
Chain. As soon as every one was seated Mary Floyd, president of the 
Senior Class, welcomed students and guests, after which Helen 
Wright, class secretary, called the roll. There followed the singing 
of their own particular songs by the various classes, ending with the 
Senior Class song. Then Mary Floyd, the class president, announced 
that the Senior Class was now on trial for various oifenses, at which 
Katharine Bourne, as judge, donned a black robe and took the plat- 
form, with Josephine Wilson as clerk of the court, Rena Harding as 
foreman of the jury, and Alice Latham as sheriff, seated on one side 
and the seven prisoners on the other. The trial, which ingeniously 
combined the class history, last will and testament, the class prophecy, 
and the class poem, was as follows : 

The Verdict. 

Katharine Bourne Prophet Judge 

Jo Wilson Historian Cleric 

Rena Harding Last Will and Testament Foreman 

(Judge enters, preceded by the Sheriff and followed by the crim- 
inals.) 

Judge : "Mr. Sheriff, open the court." 

Sheriff: O yez, O yez, this honourable court is now convened for 
the dispatch of business. May wisdom save the State and this hon- 
ourable court." 

Judge : "Mr. Clerk, what is in your pocket V 

Clerk-. "Your Honor, judgment is to be pronounced on the ver- 
dict of the jury, based upon an indictment against the members of 
the Senior Class of St. Mary's School, of 1916." 



244 The St. Mary's Muse 

Judge : "Mr. Clerk, read the indictment against said members of 
the Senior Class." 

Clerk: "The jurors for the school, upon their affidavits, present 
that the members of the class of 1916, late of St. Mary's School, with 
force and noise, permissionless, willfully and feloniously, at and in 
said school, being thereunto contaminated by the instigations of the 
Preps and crushes, and not having the fear of the Faculty before their 
eyes, at various times and in divers manners, within the last four 
years did commit the following offenses : 

"Helen Weight, after having for six years most worthy examples 
set before her, has in this her final year been found guilty of a most 
heinous offense: namely, she is lacking in Senior dignity. 

"Selena Galbraith, despite a deceptive countenance where we 
see only humane ideals, is accused by the student body as a whole of 
inflicting most cruel punishment on the dumb animals inhabiting 
the Practice Halls. 

"Sue Lamb's offense cries out from the housetops — 'tis a lack of 
faith in humanity. 

"Frances Geitner has been found guilty of flooding the universe 
with her abominable verse and attempts at rhyme. 

"Rena Harding must suffer for inflicting sweet smiles upon Dr. 
Lay. 

"Jo Wilson is convicted for timidity and bashfulness. 

"Katharine Bourne has had judgment pronounced upon her as 
a sentimentalist turned sour. 

"Mary Floyd is sentenced for disturbing the peace with a per- 
sistent insistence on speaking in public. 

"Annie Cameron, after having led the public on to believe that 
she was an earnest and ardent student, hot on the pursuit of knowl- 
edge, has proved herself a double-dyed deceiver, and is with one accord 
convicted for missing a question on 'N English.' 

"Fanny Stallings is in custody for Highway Robbery of the 
Student Body. 

"All of which is contrary to the claims and good manners of this 
said class and against the peace and dignity of said school. 

(Signed) Jo Wilson, 
Cleric of this Court." 



The St. Mary's Muse 245 

Judge: "Have the prisoners at the Bar been duly convicted by 
the jury ?" 

Clerk: "Yes, your Honor." 

Judge : "Mr. Foreman of the jury, read your verdict." 

Foreman: "The jury of the court, after having risen early and 
after having duly considered and consulted all the evidence, bring 
forth the verdict, as follows:" 

Judge : "Let the prisoners at the Bar duly stand forth." 

Foreman : "Helen Weight, the court imposes judgment upon 
you in accordance with the verdict to the effect that after having been 
found lacking in Senior dignity you are herewith fined one figure 
of equanimity and poise, to be given to Janet Fairly. 

"Selena Galbraith, the court imposes judgment upon you in 
accordance with the verdict to the effect that after having been found 
guilty of cruelty in the Practice Halls, you are fined and required to 
give one theme entitled 'Kindness to Dumb Animals' to Ruby Thorn. 

"Sue Lamb, the court imposes judgment upon you in accordance 
with the verdict to the effect that having been convicted of lack of 
faith in humanity you are straightway fined one book, 'Heroes of the 
Faith,' to be presented to Elmira Jenkins. 

"Rena Harding, the court imposes judgment upon you for dis- 
turbing Dr. Lay with your sweet smiles, and for this you are fined a 
grave countenance, to be duly presented to Nellie Rose for the 
benefit of said gentleman. 

"Katharine Bourne, the court imposes judgment upon you to the 
effect that, being a sentimentalist turned sour, you are fined one full 
moon and some love songs, to be duly presented to Frances 
Cheatham. 

"Mary Floyd, the court imposes judgment upon you that for your 
persistent insistence on speaking in public you are here fined one 
book entitled 'The Ready Speaker/ to be given to Alice Latham. 

"Frances Geitner, the court imposes judgment upon you that 
having committed the terrible crime of writing the class poem of 
1916, you are herewith required in the presence of this assembly 
to read said poem. 



246 The St. Mary's Muse 

THE CLASS POEM. 

Tomorrow, when the sun's 

First brilliant rays 

Have put to flight the lingering 

Stars of dawn, 

Our lives shall turn and seek 

In unknown ways 

The new life, leave with sadness 

That now gone. 

Together, for the last time, 
We shall hear 
The pealing of the bells 
So clear, so strong, 
Then shall we bid adieu 
To friends held dear, 
And turn aside to paths 
Now broad, now long. 

Now the portals of tomorrow 

Stand so close, 

And still within them spreads out 

Far, alone, 

What mortal man ne'er sees, 

Nor ever knows — 

The glowing, silent future, 

Vast unknown. 

Then, dawn of near tomorrow, 

Hasten on, 

And with your golden rays 

So dazzling bright, 

Oh, cast upon our separate 

Paths at dawn 

Your clear, your ever faithful 

Guiding light. 

"Jo Wilson, the court imposes judgment upon you to the effect 
that, having been found guilty of timidity and bashfidness, you are 
on this day fined one Essay on 8 elf -Reliance, to be forthwith given to 
Virginia Allen. 

"Annie Cameron, the court imposes judgment upon you in accord- 
ance with the verdict to the effect that having committed the criminal 
offense of missing a question in English, you are fined one Alarm, 
Clock, to be given to Eleanor Relyea for early rising. 



The St. Maky's Muse 247 

"Fanny Stallings, the court imposes judgment upon you in 
accordance with the verdict to the effect that having been found guilty 
of the terrible offense of Highway Robbery of the Students of St. 
Mary's, you are here fined and called upon to give one check for 
$50,000 to Emma Badham. 

"The Class as a whole having been found guilty, are fined the 
following : 

"To Dr. Lay: We give our Senior Privileges, that he may bestow 
them upon the Class of 1917. 

"One bag of nickels to be herewith presented to Miss Eleanor W. 
Thomas for next year's Senior English (to be given as rewards for 
perfect lessons). 

"This Book of Statistics we gladly give to Mr. Stone to enjoy 
during the summer months, while he has no classes to look them up 
for him. 

"This pound we present to Miss Clara Fenner to be divided 
into ounces, which she may give to her Art Students to be used by 
them, that they may not be so stupid. 

"To Miss Barton we leave this certificate assuring her of good 
weather, so that she can have an athletic event every single Monday 
during next year. 

"To Mr. Cruikshank we leave this box of brand new ideas for the 
benefit of the Muse Club in next year's entertainments. 

"To the Juniors we leave this rubber ring, hoping that next year 
they will cut their wisdom teeth with more ease than we have done. 

"To the Little Preps we leave these our Senior Colors, The Green 
and White, to be worn by them until the good year 1920. 

"To our dear Miss Lizzie Lee we leave the love and best ivishes 
of the Senior Class." 

Judge : "The court will now pronounce final judgment upon all 
the members of the Senior Class of 1916, and will then dismiss 
them on parole." 



248 The St. Maky's Muse 



THE CLASS PROPHECY OP 1916. 

The year of 1926 had dawned for us at last 

And I started to attend 

A big reunion of my class, 

And so I'll tell you briefly 

All the things that came to pass. 

% $ * # * # 

There at Selma, just the same, 
I met two girls whom I shall name, 
For they were also on their way 
To meet with us on our Class Day. 

Mary Floyd I first did see, 
And she was fat as fat could be, 
For she'd become a farmer's wife 
And lived upon the cream of life. 

Helen Wright was the other one 
Waiting there to join the fun; 
She'd become a fine trained nurse — 
Her fate indeed might have been worse. 

Raleigh then we reached at last, 

And, forgetting ten years had passed, 

To Brantley's, of course, we straightway went, 

And there found others with like intent. 

Jo was eating cherries and cream 
To drown her cares, so it would seem, 
For matron she was of the deaf and dumb, 
And loved the children every one. 

There was Rena by her side, 
Smiling, for she was a bride, 
The very latest in our class, 
But still we hope not quite the last. 

Soon we started for the school 

And feared lest we should break a rule 

And as of old again be late, 

So for the car we did not wait. 

And there was Annie, of all most famed 
Among great writers she was named, 
And we're still watching eagerly 
To see her rising destiny. 



The St. Mary's Muse 249 

Then, after hunting the school around, 
We at last our Fannie found; 
In a growing bank business 
She's become a great success. 

The roll was called — but where was "Geit"? 
Working away with all her might 
In heathen lands so far away, 
Turning darkness into day. 

Selena answered to her name; 
She loves her music just the same, 
And on the stage she has been seen 
Playing for a king and queen. 

Our gentle Sue came in that night, 
Telling us of Women's Rights, 
For she's a leader in the cause, 
And everywere wins great applause. 
****** 

O Class of 1916, who ever would have thought 

That such funny combinations 

With your members could be wrought? 

And yet we dare to hope success 

To your ventures may be brought. 

"Mr. Sheriff, adjourn the Court to meet again at the same time and 
place on May 22, 1936." 

Sheriff : "O yez, O yez, O yez, this honourable court now stands 
adjourned until May 22, 1936 A. D. Save this school and this sup- 
posedly honourable court and this would-be pretentious Class of 
1916." 

At the end of the trial of the Senior Class an accusation was brought 
against the Class of 1912 as follows: 

"The so-called 'Classy Class' of 1912, notorious for their frivolous 
tendencies, are hereby accused of having left in St. Mary's a germ 
of their frivolity. Let the accused stand forth." At this the four 
members of the Class of 1912 who were present came forward, bear- 
ing before them a large pasteboard butterfly. • Then Patsy Smith, 
the Class President, explained that four years ago, on their own 
Class Day, they had attempted to destroy this emblem of frivolity and 



250 The St. Mary's Muse 

had failed, but that now they were determined to destroy the last 
vestige of it. Then all four — Patsy Smith, Elizabeth Hughes, Nellie 
Hendricks and Frances Bottum — gathered around the butterfly and 
each recited a verse declaring that they had laid aside all frivolity 
and had settled down to a grave and dignified existence. Then Patsy 
Smith made a charming, characteristic speech, in which she expressed 
the pleasure of the Class of 1912 at being present and the delight 
that they felt in being able to present to the school a new light 
for the Library. After this the Class of 1915, of whom sixteen were 
present, sang a parody of their class song. 

Then followed the dedication of the Annual Muse to Bishop 
Cheshire and presentation of copies to Dr. Logan, Mrs. Iredell, 
Dr. and Mrs. Lay, and Miss Frances Bottum. Then Prances Tillot- 
son sang "Good-bye, School," with the Seniors joining in the chorus, 
and the Class Day exercises closed with the singing of "Alma Mater." 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price One Dollar. 

Single Copies ' Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1915-1916. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 

Mabt A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hott Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

sssrssssKSSr ' 16 } »»»— ««■— 



EDITORIAL 



Farewell 

With this issue, the 20th volume of the Monthly Muse is brought 
to a close and the present board of editors wish to take this last chance 
to thank not only the girls and the members of the faculty, but all the 
subscribers for their hearty cooperation. Especially do we appre- 
ciate the interest taken by the old St. Mary's girls and the ready way 
in which they have rendered whatever help they could. We partic- 
ularly wish to thank Jennie Woodruff, '13, Laura Clark, '14, and 
Margaret Bottum, '15, for their faithfulness in furnishing Class 
News whenever called upon. But most of all we feel that our thanks 
and appreciation are due to Mr. Cruikshank, without whom we can 
truthfully say there would have been no Muse. His patient forbear- 
ance, his wise advice, his ready help and never-flagging interest are 
well known to any St. Mary's girl, especially to any Muse girl ; but 
only the editors can fully appreciate just what this means in connec- 
tion with the Muse. We are looking forward to next year's Muse 
with a great deal of interest and expectancy, for we feel assured that 
under the guidance of Virginia Allen it will be a wonderful success. 
It is with reluctant regret that we, the present board, lay aside the 
pleasant work that we have so thoroughly enjoyed, and we wish the 
Muse Board of 1916-17 all sorts of good luck, and hope that they will 
have as pleasant a year as we have had. 



252 The St. Mary's Muse 

The Reunions 

Perhaps one of the very nicest things about the 1916 commence- 
ment was the pleasure we all got out of the two reunions of 1912 and 

1915 that were held at that time. The Class of 1915 was well repre- 
sented, having during commencement sixteen of its members present. 
These were Margaret Bottum, Elizabeth Lay, Carol Collier, Gyp 
Barton, Matilda Hancock, Elizabeth Carrison, Mattie Moye Adams, 
Florence Stone, Margaret, Edna and Edith Mann, Virginia Bonner, 
Anna Belle King, Maude Hotchkiss, Allene Thornburgh, and Gladys 
Yates. It was a very pleasant sight to see our last year's Seniors 
taking lunch once more together in Clement Hall on Class Day, their 
table very attractively decorated with red crepe paper and beautiful 
bunches of scarlet poppies, the class flower. It is unnecessary to say 
how glad we were to see them back again, and we only hope that they 
enjoyed their visit half as much as we did. 

It was an especial delight to the Seniors to welcome back their 
sister Class of 1912. The four members who were present were 
Misses Patsy Smith, Elizabeth Hughes, Nellie Hendricks, and Fran- 
ces Bottum, and we regretted that the other four could not be here 
with them. A very pleasant hour was spent by the two classes in the 
Muse Room on Class Day afternoon from five-thirty to six-thirty, 
when the Seniors gave their sister class a small "Green Party" as a 
slight token of their pleasure at welcoming them back to their com- 
mencement. The only people present at the party were the members 
of the two classes and Mr. Cruikshank, the 1916 Class Adviser. It 
was a great regret to all that Miss Thomas, the 1912 Class Adviser, 
was unable through illness to be present. Both the Class of 1912 and 
the Class of 1916 hope to be present at the commencement of 1920, 
when their colors, the Green and White, will graduate again. 

The two reunions were the greatest success and added wonderfully 
to the pleasure of commencement. We hope this is the good begin- 
ning of a regular custom at St. Mary's and that each succeeding year 
larger and larger numbers of graduates will gather at the School, thus 
adding immeasurably to the pleasure of the students. The Class of 

1916 will have its first reunion on Alumna? Day, 1917, and it is hoped 
that many other classes will do the same. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



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Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



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and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 

JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLB STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLOEIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Orer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. O. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNA ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnae Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

OHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe 'which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's -will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 
Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning 1 Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing: 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards& Broughton Printing 

Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & W/nne Jewelry Cq. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD I. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

; GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



H. 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 0. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



L. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and S3 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayettevllle St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes 4 Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH. N. C. 
Collegre Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 

Frames, Novelties 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Caedwell & O'Kelly, Peopeietoes 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 

Via M'ASHIXGTOX, KIXSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVTLLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD. G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. C 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

j St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

i 

(for girls and young women) 



75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1916. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^_ TEE ART DEPARTMENT 

infection I -4- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these ] 5m THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments I 

1 6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

In 1915-16 jvere enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS a BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH, N C